Tuesday, December 23, 2014

Bold, Consistent, Flawless: 2015

Just a reminder to myself:

BOLD STRATEGY. CONSISTENT COMMUNICATION. FLAWLESS EXECUTION.
Define and cement your purpose and what you want to get done in 2015. Map a clear and bold strategy for the most important initiatives you’ll embark upon. Communicate successes, failures, rockstar moments and misses. Do this often, celebrate the small wins and share the losses. Remember, actions speak louder than words. 
via PSFK, Will You Go Through 2015 or Grow Through 2015?

Wednesday, December 03, 2014

A Wrinkle in Time: Singing in the Rain

Numb.
Amadou Diallo [Say it “Amado”. Loved one]
Not one but 41.
Multiply it.
I place all of Heaven with its power
The skies gone gray, pouring from L.A. to Harlem, USA.
Umi’s light dims
The Goddess frowns
The Star on the Tree lost in the haze
of acrimony at 30 Rock.
Anthony Baez
My chest tightens
#Ican’tbreathe
Again
No playing ball allowed.
But he’s just a boy
#IamTrayvon
Taste the rainbow
of blood-splattered skittles
I have a dream
I will color my hoodie
with the tears of my pain.
#YaMeCanse
Protect my daughters
Kiss my brothers
Bendición
Bless me, Ultima
I still dream of Avonte’s little face.
How did we lose you,
when we left you safe at school?
And the fire with all the strength it hath
Ferguson burns
Candlelight vigils lit in vain
This type of warfare isn’t new or a shock…
Just hit rewind, again
1993 mad kids are getting tense
We didn’t start the fire
And the winds with its swiftness on its path
#Don’tshoot
And the bombs
in my head
in my head
Oscar Grant.
Don’t turn ya back.
We come in peace
Where is Daddy?
Who shot ya?
Mercy, mercy, me
Defeat and sorrow
I cannot carry the weight
of the heavy world
All these, I place
with the Universe’s almighty help and grace

Between myself and the powers of darkness

Tuesday, December 02, 2014

NYC: Becoming Julia de Burgos: The Making of a Puerto Rican Icon

Puerto Rican people
 (Photo: Wikipedia)
You are invited to Becoming Julia de Burgos: The Making of a Puerto Rican Icon:

A study of poet and political activist Julia de Burgos’ development as a writer, her experience of migration and her legacy in New York. Come celebrate on release of Centro’s Journal’s special issue on Julia.

Author: Vanessa Pérez Rosario
Moderator: Oscar Montero
Presenter: Lena Burgos Lafuente

Thursday, December 4
6:00-8:00 pm
Hunter College, Faculty Dining Room,
West Building, 8th Floor
Co-sponsored with El Museo del Barrio

RSVP for this event emailing centro.events@hunter.cuny.edu or call (212) 772-5714.

Friday, November 07, 2014

#FridayReads: The Heart Has Its Reasons by Maria Duenas

English: San Francisco harbor (Yerba Buena Cov...
 San Francisco harbor (Yerba Buena Cove), 1850 or 1851, with Yerba Buena Island in the background. Daguerrotype. . (Photo: Wikipedia)
Declared “a writer to watch” (Publishers Weekly, starred review), New York Times bestselling author María Dueñas pours heart and soul into this story of a woman who discovers the power of second chances.

With her debut novel The Time in Between, María Dueñas garnered outstanding acclaim and inspired a TV series, dubbed the “Spanish Downton Abbey” by the media. 

USA TODAY said of the book: “From a terrific opening line to the final page, chapters zip by at a pulsing pace.” Now Dueñas returns with a novel about a heartbroken woman’s attempt to pick up the pieces of her shattered world.

Blanca Perea is a college professor in Madrid who seems to have it all. But her perfect career and marriage start to unravel when her husband of twenty years suddenly leaves her for another woman. Devastated, Blanca is forced to question the life she once had and how well she truly knows herself. 

She leaves Madrid for San Francisco, where she becomes entrenched in the history of an enigmatic Spanish writer who died decades earlier. The more Blanca discovers about this man, the more she is enthralled by the ill-fated loves, half truths, and silent ambitions that haunted his life.

With lush, imaginative prose and unforgettable characters, The Heart Has Its Reasons is a journey of the soul that takes readers from Spain to California, between the thorny past and all-too-real present. It is a story about the thrill of creating one’s life anew.

Friday, October 24, 2014

#FridayReads: ¡Tequila!: Distilling the Spirit of Mexico by Marie Gaytán

Italy has grappa, Russia has vodka, Jamaica has rum. Around the world, certain drinks—especially those of the intoxicating kind—are synonymous with their peoples and cultures. For Mexico, this drink is tequila. 

For many, tequila can conjure up scenes of body shots on Cancún bars and coolly garnished margaritas on sandy beaches. Its power is equally strong within Mexico, though there the drink is more often sipped rather than shot, enjoyed casually among friends, and used to commemorate occasions from the everyday to the sacred. Despite these competing images, tequila is universally regarded as an enduring symbol of lo mexicano.

¡Tequila! Distilling the Spirit of Mexico traces how and why tequila became and remains Mexico's national drink and symbol. Starting in Mexico's colonial era and tracing the drink's rise through the present day, Marie Sarita Gaytán reveals the formative roles played by some unlikely characters. 

Although the notorious Pancho Villa was a teetotaler, his image is now plastered across the labels of all manner of tequila producers—he's even the namesake of a popular brand. Mexican films from the 1940s and 50s, especially Western melodramas, buoyed tequila's popularity at home while World War II caused a spike in sales within the whisky-starved United States. 

Today, cultural attractions such as Jose Cuervo's Mundo Cuervo and the Tequila Express let visitors insert themselves into the Jaliscan countryside—now a UNESCO-protected World Heritage Site—and relish in the nostalgia of pre-industrial Mexico.

Our understanding of tequila as Mexico's spirit is not the result of some natural affinity but rather the cumulative effect of U.S.-Mexican relations, technology, regulation, the heritage and tourism industries, shifting gender roles, film, music, and literature. Like all stories about national symbols, the rise of tequila forms a complicated, unexpected, and poignant tale. 

By unraveling its inner workings, Gaytán encourages us to think critically about national symbols more generally, and the ways in which they both reveal and conceal to tell a story about a place, a culture, and a people. In many ways, the story of tequila is the story of Mexico.

Marie Sarita Gaytán is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at the University of Utah.

Friday, October 10, 2014

#FridayReads: Voyage of Strangers by Elizabeth Zelvin

Taino symbol of a sun
Taino symbol of a sun (Photo: Wikipedia)
The year is 1493, and young Jewish sailor Diego Mendoza has returned from Columbus’s triumphant first voyage with tales of lush landscapes, rivers running with gold, and welcoming locals. But back home in Spain, Diego finds the Inquisition at its terrifying peak, and he must protect his spirited sister, Rachel, from betrayal and death.

Disguising herself as a boy, Rachel sneaks onto Columbus’s second expedition, bound for the new lands they call the Indies. As the Spaniards build their first settlements and search for gold, Diego and Rachel fall in love with the place, people, and customs. Still forced to hide their religious faith and Rachel’s true identity, the brother and sister witness the Spaniards’ devastation of the island in their haste to harvest riches.

This unflinching look at Columbus’s exploration and its terrible cost to the native Taino people introduces two valiant young people who struggle against the inevitable destruction of paradise.

Elizabeth Zelvin is a New York City psychotherapist and author of a mystery series featuring recovering alcoholic Bruce Kohler. Liz is a three-time Agatha Award nominee and a Derringer Award nominee for Best Short Story. 

She is currently working on the sequel to Voyage of Strangers. Liz is also an award-winning poet with two books of poetry and a singer-songwriter whose album of original songs is titled Outrageous Older Woman. After many years in private practice and directing alcohol treatment programs, she now sees clients from all over the world online. Her author website is at www.elizabethzelvin.com. 

Visit www.lizzelvin.com for Liz’s music and www.LZcybershrink.com for online therapy. Liz is a veteran blogger, posting weekly for seven years on Poe’s Deadly Daughters and, most recently, on SleuthSayers.

 
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