Monday, May 06, 2013

New Book: Jenni Rivera: The Incredible Story of a Warrior Butterfly


Jenni Rivera was the top-selling artist within the Regional Mexican music genre. With a weekly radio show, her own reality show, a makeup and clothing line, and her own foundation, she was at the height of her career and life. Everything she had conquered, with blood, sweat, tears, and smiles, hap¬pened, as she said, with God leading her by the hand. However her life, her dreams, and the joy she shared with so many came to a tragic end just before dawn on December 9, 2012.

In Jenni Rivera: The Incredible Story of a Warrior Butterfly, Leila Cobo—pianist, TV host, and Executive Director for Latino content and programming at Billboard—brings us Jenni Rivera’s intimate and moving biography, reflecting on the party girl, the elegant woman, the great diva, the friend, the mother, and the grandmother. 


A Fulbright scholar from Cali, Colombia, Leila Cobo is a novelist, pianist, TV host  and executive Editor for Latin Content and Programming for Billboard. Under her tenure, Billboard has expanded its coverage of Latin Music and for the first time in its more than 100-year history, the magazine has a complete weekly section dedicated solely to Latin music. 

As an author Ms. Cobo’s first novel, Tell Me Something True, was published Oct. 1 to critical acclaim by Grand Central Publishing/Hatchette and is now in its third printing. Her second novel, The Second Time We Met, was published in 2012.

Prior to Billboard, Leila wrote for the Los Angeles Times and was later the pop music critic at the Miami Herald. She’s written liner notes for Ricky Martin, Shakira, Julio Iglesias and Selena among others, and collaborates closely with Grammy in the Schools and Teach for America, among other projects.

Ms. Cobo is also one of the authors of the Billboard Illustrated Encyclopedia of Music and a guest writer on the anthology Quinceañera.


Wednesday, May 01, 2013

Have you tried Nueva Cocina Foods?

The other day while browsing the meat aisle of my local A&P Supermarket, after stocking up on healthy snacks at Trader's Joes, I spotted a package of taco seasoning labeled "Nueva Cocina® Latin" that claimed to be MSG- free, gluten free, and all-natural; all products contain no artificial ingredients or preservatives.

I am not sure if you've spotted this brand before, I certainly hadn't but I was really pleased to discover it. Keep an eye for their rice, seasonings and soup products. I hope they extend their line too and make some low sodium versions soon.



Tuesday, April 30, 2013

New Book: Mama's Child

I read Mama's Child by Joan Steinau Lester in one day. It was that gripping and enticing, a tale about identity, race, denial and fealty. I almost stopped reading the book immediately at the begin when I realized their dog was named "Che" but honestly this book blurb does not do this book justice. It definitely resonated with me.


A stunning tale about the deeply entrenched conflicts between a white mother and her biracial daughter.

Mama’s Child is story of an idealistic young white woman who traveled to the American South as a civil rights worker, fell in love with an African American man, and started a family in San Francisco, where the more liberal city embraced them—except when it didn’t. They raise a son and daughter, but the tensions surrounding them have a negative impact on their marriage, and they divorce when their children are still young. For their biracial daughter, this split further destabilizes her already challenged sense of self—“Am I black or white?” she must ask herself, “Where do I belong?” Is she her father’s daughter alone?

As the years pass, the chasm between them widens, even as the mother attempts to hold on to the emotional chord that binds them. It isn’t until the daughter, Ruby, herself becomes a wife and mother that she begins to develop compassion and understanding for the many ways that her own mother’s love transcended race and questions of identity.''

Joan Steinau Lester, Ed.D., is an award-winning journalist and author of four critically acclaimed books. Her writing has appeared in many newspapers and magazines, including Essence, Los Angeles Times, Chicago Tribune, and Cosmopolitan. She lives in Northern California.

Sunday, April 28, 2013

Possible Future? The End of the Bookshop

Someone needs to tell those tales. When the battles are fought and won and lost, when the pirates find their treasures and the dragons eat their foes for breakfast with a nice cup of Lapsang souchong, someone needs to tell their bits of overlapping narrative. There's magic in that. 

It's in the listener, and for each and every ear it will be different, and it will affect them in ways they can never predict. From the mundane to the profound. 

You may tell a tale that takes up residence in someone's soul, becomes their blood and self and purpose. That tale will move them and drive them and who knows what they might do because of it, because of your words. 

That is your role, your gift. Your sister may be able to see the future, but you yourself can shape it, boy. Do not forget that... there are many kinds of magic, after all.” ― Erin Morgenstern, The Night Circus



The Last Bookshop imagines a future where physical books have died out. thelastbookshop.co.uk


Saturday, April 27, 2013

Lit Links & Scoops


- Isabel Allende: By the Book: The author of the forthcoming novel “Maya’s Notebook” says reading Gabriel García Márquez made her want to become a writer: “I thought, ‘If this guy can do it, so can I.’ ”

Emilio Gil on Modern Spanish Book Design

- Lulu Delacre, Bilingual Children’s Book Author & Illustrator Says, “The Power is in Numbers

Top 20 Spanish-Language Novels Written Since 1982, (written in 2007)

- What librarians consider when putting together a Spanish-language children’s book collection

- If you have not see the documentary, The Central Park Five, you must watch it. It's online and in Spanish.


Thursday, April 25, 2013

Mother Atabey & the Web of Life: The Green Latina

We travel in so many circles. 
Renewed, reborn, reconnected, 
over and over again.

Earlier this year in an attempt to eat healthier and greener, I joined Urban Organics, a service that delivers a box of fresh, organic produce from local farms every week to your home, after reading about it on Treehugger. In honor of Earth Day, I wanted to share a little bit of the experience here.

My first box endowed me with beautiful greens and fruits so pretty I was forced to Instagram.


I was mystified by all the lovely greens but luckily some were labeled and I quickly learned to distinguish Chard from Kale and so on. Using Pinterest and the web, I learned the best way to get grit and sand off the greens is by soaking them in a bowl, letting the soil and fine sand float to the top and then changing the water until it is all clear. Unfortunately, I learned this the hard way and can tell you that nothing sucks as much as chewing on gritty leaves.

Inspired by fellow bloggers like Chris Brogan, I bought a juicer and now about once a week, I make fresh carrot juice and a separate batch of orange or fruit juice. It's great to consume but it's quite a lot of work to rinse, chop, and then clean up the mess.

Part of the fun too was the "mystery box" angle to the delivery each week, sometimes I was at a complete loss with what to do, with say an eggplant, for example, which I don't like and have never cooked. I ended up using a recipe I found online for Baba Ganoush and found it to be quite yummy. Part of the difficulty too was in the abundance of produce for only two people and not having the time to prep it and/or eat it.

I tried pickling beets, and freezing broccoli, green beans, and a random eggplant but soon my freezer was full. Twice, my produce drawer hit its limit and was overflowing with spuds and I then took a stab at making potato kugel for Passover and Shepherd's Pie, Verdict: Delicious, very high in carbs and doesn't keep very well. I even prepared filling nutritious breakfast treats in advance.



Every once in a while I was forced to chuck greens that wilted or completely yellowed and fruit that just went bad, all the while feeling guilty and wasteful. Even throwing out the pulp from my juicer, I wished I could donate it to someone's compost pile if not longing for my own where chubby little worms could get their fill and give me rich soil for pretty flowers. Yet this is a start. I will lead a better more enriched life. I will eat less processed food. I will eat more food that was tenderly grown and made with love and compassion. I will not burden my descendants with the ills of obesity, diabetes or malnutrition. I will treat my body as the temple it has always been. Barriga llena, corazon contento.



All in all, it's been a low cost, fun experience toward a healthier future. I think I will continue the service through the summer just to feast on summer's sweet harvest.


* Atabey (Taino, Puerto Rico) - Primary Supreme being representing the four cardinal points. Unique Turtle women of fertility, beauty, rituals, music, and ceremonies; mother of twins Yúcahu (God of Yuca/ the sea and the mountains) and Juracán ( God of Hurricanes). She who gave birth to herself from all the elements , celestial Earth Mother Goddess of five names.

Taino Prayer to the Mother Goddess by tainoray

Bibi Atabey - Mother Atabey
Atte itabo era - Mother of Waters
Coaiba Mamona - Heavenly Mother of the Moon
Aturo aya wakia Itiba Cahubaba - Sister of our Ancient Bleeding Mother
Acona wakia Arawaka - Hear our Sacred People
Yemao waka waili - Protect our Children
Wakia Yari - Our Precious Jewels
Busica Waka Ketauri - Give us Life
Inaru-Matum - Generous Woman
Busica wakia Ahia Hu De - Give us your Blessing
Tai Ku Buya Han Han - Good Spirit Yes
Nabori Daca - I am your servant
Han Han Katu - So Be It

 
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