Showing posts with label translation. Show all posts
Showing posts with label translation. Show all posts

Friday, August 07, 2015

#FridayReads: Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera

I came across Signs Preceding the End of the World by Yuri Herrera in Flavorwire's 15 Best Fiction Books of 2015 So Far
Signs Preceding the End of the World is one of the most arresting novels to be published in Spanish in the last ten years. Yuri Herrera does not simply write about the border between Mexico and the United States and those who cross it. He explores the crossings and translations people make in their minds and language as they move from one country to another, especially when there’s no going back. 
Traversing this lonely territory is Makina, a young woman who knows only too well how to survive in a violent, macho world. Leaving behind her life in Mexico to search for her brother, she is smuggled into the USA carrying a pair of secret messages – one from her mother and one from the Mexican underworld. 
In this grippingly original novel Yuri Herrera explores the actual and psychological crossings and translations people make—with their feet, in their minds, and in their language as they move from one country to another, especially when there's no going back. 
Born in Actopan, Mexico, in 1970, Yuri Herrera studied in Mexico and El Paso and took his PhD at Berkeley. Signs Preceding the End of the World (Señales que precederán al fin del mundo) was shortlisted for the Rómulo Gallegos Prize and is being published in several languages. After publishing Signs Preceding the End of the World, And Other Stories will publish his two other novels in English, starting with The Transmigration of Bodies (La transmigración de los cuerpos) in 2016. He is currently teaching at the University of Tulane, in New Orleans. 
 

Monday, June 11, 2012

New Book: Race in Translation

The English Speaking World
The English Speaking World
(Photo credit: Charles Jeffrey Danoff)
What does "Race" mean to other people in other lands? Race in Translation: Culture Wars around the Postcolonial Atlantic by Robert Stam and Ella Shohat, take on an exploration of the concept abroad.

Book Blurb

While the term "culture wars" often designates the heated arguments in the English-speaking world spiralling around race, the canon, and affirmative action, in fact these discussions have raged in multiple sites and languages. 


Charting the multidirectional traffic of the debates, Stam/Shohat trace their literal and figurative translation, seen in French Postcolonial Studies and Brazilian Whiteness Studies, and in such cultural phenomena as Tropicalia and Hip-Hop. The authors also interrogate an ironic convergence whereby rightist politicians join hands with leftist intellectuals, along with the Neo-Cons and Nouveaux Philosophes, in condemning the "spectre" of multiculturalism and identity politics


At once a report from various "fronts," a mapping of the germane literatures, and an argument about cross-border comparison and interlocution, the book constitutes a major contribution to our understanding of the diasporic and transnational movement of ideas.


Monday, March 02, 2009

The 2009 Best Translated Book Awards

In case you missed it there was a great article, Latin lit shines at first translation awards in the NY Daily News last week.

Two of the finalist were Chilean Roberto Bolaño’s posthumous "2666" translated from Spanish byNatasha Wimmer, and "Senselessness" by Salvadoran Horacio Castellanos Moya and translated by Katherine Silver.

From the article: ""Translation of Spanish-language literature is leading the way of this whole translation boom we’re seeing right now.""

"...readers may find translations of contemporary works more appealing because the U.S. has been "overrun by writing programs and commercialism ... a similarity in writing."

Do you agree? What's you favorite translated work or author?

You can click here to download the official awards press release.
 
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