Showing posts with label Argentina. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Argentina. Show all posts

Friday, July 03, 2015

#FridayReads: The Gods of Tango by Carolina De Robertis

From one of the leading lights of contemporary Latin American literature—a lush, lyrical, deeply moving story of a young woman whose passion for the early sounds of tango becomes a force of profound and unexpected change.

February 1913: seventeen-year-old Leda, carrying only a small trunk and her father’s cherished violin, leaves her Italian village for a new home, and a new husband, in Argentina. Arriving in Buenos Aires, she discovers that he has been killed, but she remains: living in a tenement, without friends or family, on the brink of destitution. Still, she is seduced by the music that underscores life in the city: tango, born from lower-class immigrant voices, now the illicit, scandalous dance of brothels and cabarets. 

Leda eventually acts on a long-held desire to master the violin, knowing that she can never play in public as a woman. She cuts off her hair, binds her breasts, and becomes “Dante,” a young man who joins a troupe of tango musicians bent on conquering the salons of high society. Now, gradually, the lines between Leda and Dante begin to blur, and feelings that she has long kept suppressed reveal themselves, jeopardizing not only her musical career, but her life. 

Richly evocative of place and time, its prose suffused with the rhythms of the tango, its narrative at once resonant and gripping, this is De Robertis’s most accomplished novel yet.


CAROLINA DE ROBERTIS was raised in England, Switzerland, and California by Uruguayan parents. She is the author of two previous novels, Perla and The Invisible Mountain (a Best Book of 2009 according to theSan Francisco Chronicle, O, The Oprah Magazine, and Booklist), the recipient of Italy’s Rhegium Julii Prize, and a 2012 fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. She has spent the past year living in Uruguay, but her permanent home is in Oakland, CA.

Monday, June 24, 2013

New Book: The Hare By César Aira

Mujer mapuche con joyas de plata, ca. 1890
Mujer mapuche con joyas de plata, ca. 1890 (Photo: Wikipedia)
Vintage engraving of Mapuche
Vintage engraving of Mapuche (Photo: Wikipedia)
Add this one to your list:

When a Mapuche chief suddenly goes missing, a British naturalist is asked to find him in the vast Argentine pampas

Clarke, a nineteenth-century English naturalist, roams the pampas in search of that most elusive and rare animal: the Legibrerian hare, whose defining quality seems to be its ability to fly. The local Indians, pointing skyward, report recent sightings of the hare but then ask Clarke to help them search for their missing chief as well. On further investigation Clarke finds more than meets the eye:in the Mapuche and Voroga languages every word has at least two meanings.

Witty, very ironic, and with all the usual Airian digressive magic, The Hare offers subtle reflections on love, Victorian-era colonialism, and the many ambiguities of language.

César Aira (b. 1949) was born in Coronel Pringles, Argentina, in 1949. He has published more than seventy books of fiction and essays.

Nick Caistor is a translator, editor, and author. He has written a biography of Octavio Paz and has translated the works of José Saramago, Paulo Coelho, and Julián Ríos, among others.


Monday, September 03, 2012

New Book: Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America by Maricel E. Presilla

I can remember a conversation I had a few years back with my then mentor, Michael Pietsch, Executive Vice President and Publisher of Little, Brown and Company, about cookbooks. I had expressed my concerns that the web was changing consumers' needs for buying cookbooks since it was so easy to just get them online. I remember him furrowing his brow and internally cringing at the thought that that perhaps I had been too frank. I don't think publishers need to be worried anymore though.

Lately, however, I've noticed a trend toward the objectification of things and especially vintage items, like books and vinyl. I think cookbooks, especially the most eye pleasing will fall into this category and they will always have a place on a shelf or a coffee table.

During my early twenties, I collected cookbooks, which I dreamed I would one day display in my kitchen, in the home of my future. When I came across Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America by Maricel E. Presilla, I felt that old knee jerk shopaholic/collector pull: have-to-have-it!

I think you might feel this way too...

How to cook everything Latin American. 

W. W. Norton & Company (October 1, 2012)
Gran Cocina Latina unifies the vast culinary landscape of the Latin world, from Mexico to Argentina and all the Spanish-speaking countries of the Caribbean. In one volume it gives home cooks, armchair travelers, and curious chefs the first comprehensive collection of recipes from this region. 


An inquisitive historian and a successful restaurateur, Maricel E. Presilla has spent more than thirty years visiting each country personally. She’s gathered more than 500 recipes for the full range of dishes, from the foundational adobos and sofritos to empanadas and tamales to ceviches and moles to sancocho and desserts such as flan and tres leches cake


Detailed equipment notes, drink and serving suggestions, and color photographs of finished dishes are also included. This is a one-of-a-kind cookbook to be savored and read as much for the writing and information as for its introduction to heretofore unrevealed recipes. Two-color; 32 pages of color photographs; 75 line drawings.


Maricel E. Presilla is the co-owner of Zafra and Cucharamama, two Latin restaurants in Hoboken, New Jersey. She holds a doctorate in medieval Spanish history from New York University and lives in Weehawken, New Jersey.




Monday, July 09, 2012

The Book That Can’t Wait: An Anthology of Latin American Authors

"Eterna Cadencia, a publisher based in Argentina, has recently debuted a new book called The Book That Can’t Wait. This book is an anthology featuring excerpts and short works from a number of new Latin American authors, but the most important detail about this book is that it is printed with disappearing ink. Within two months of being exposed to air, the ink in the book, which is sold in a sealed bag, will oxidize and disappear, forcing the owner "to read the book in a timely fashion." via The-digital-reader



Promotion: "The "invention" got a huge media attention. The book was broadcasted in the prime time tv news of the main national tv channels, as the "Story of the Day". It was also covered by the main national newspapers and radio shows. We put both literature and the names of new and unknown latin american authors in the center of mass media attention. - We gave away the first edition the very same day we released the book. - The general sales of the Eterna Cadencia bookstore increased 43%. - This time we had the guarantee that our new authors were read, and we gave to their names an unusual and massive promotion that would have costed at least 1 million pesos to achieve trough traditional advertising." - Canneslions

Friday, July 24, 2009

Growing Up with an Argentinian Dad

Cover of "The Impostor's Daughter: A True...
Cover of The Impostor's Daughter: A True Memoir
In The Impostor's Daughter: A True Memoir by Laurie Sandell, she"recounts the gradual realization that her charming, larger-than-life Argentine father, bragging of war metals, degrees from prestigious universities and acquaintances with famous people, had lied egregiously to his family about his past and accomplishments." (via Publishers Weekly)

Composed as stunning graphic novel by Laurie Sandell, who is a journalist and published cartoonist, it is guaranteed to both delight you and mesmerize you.

Laurie Sandell grew up in Stockton, California, then lived in upstate New York, and has traveled the world: Jerusalem, Tokyo, Egypt, Jordan, backpacked all over Europe and then ended up going full circle back to Buenos Aires.

She now lives in Brooklyn and is a contributing editor at Glamour Magazine.

She will guest post on Literanista on Sunday!
 
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