Showing posts with label latinos. Show all posts
Showing posts with label latinos. Show all posts

Tuesday, December 03, 2013

3 Amazing Ad Campaigns Aimed at Hispanics in 2013

Meanwhile over at Hispanic Trending... Check out my latest post - thanks Juan!


Thursday, June 13, 2013

Invest in Afrolatinos: The Untaught Story

With your support, together we can bring the story of Afrolatinos to the world! Siempre Pa'lante!


2013 indigogo Video from Renzo Devia / Creador Pictures on Vimeo.

Learn more: http://www.afrolatinos.tv/ Also follow on Facebook, TwitterTumblr and Instagram. Conectate!

 

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Crush it en la Cocina! A Pilón/Molcajete Giveaway

I've always been fascinated by pilóns, the wooden mortar and pestles, so commonly used in Latin cuisine that I'm instantly taken to my mother's kitchen as she crushed garlic and oregano in a teeny bit of olive oil and salt to make her dishes like pernil or mofongo amazing.

In fact, I've started collecting my own array of these traditional tools sometimes made of ceramic, stone, metal or wood and used to crush, grind, and mash ingredients, medicines, herbs and seasonings. There is something so powerful about the act of grinding nature's bounty, almost like an alchemist, with your own two hands in a way that your ancestors have for thousands of years.

Italians used mortars and pestles since the 15th Century in apothecaries, the Molcajete or Mexican version dates back to over 6,000 years ago, Aztec and Maya cultures and is made literally of the earth, from volcanic rock. The Thais usage dates back to the 13th Century.

IMUSA, which specializes in Hispanic cookware and appliances, recently reached out to me about their line calderos (dutch oven pots), griddles & sauté pans, tostoneras, authentic molcajetes, empanada makers, tortilla warmers, salsa dishes and much more. They have some really great products that celebrate both the culture and cuisine of Latinos.

Honestly, some of these kitchen items are so cool and beautiful that they make perfect gifts. They have been kind enough to sponsor a giveaway for Literanista readers - more below on how to win one of three Lava Rock Molcajetes: Made from ultra-durable natural volcanic lava rock, this mortar and pestle set is large enough to grind up a party-size batch of guacamole, then mix and serve it in the same bowl. ($59.99 at Macy’s) Enter to win one below and help my blog gain more visitors:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Guacamole and avocado are some of my favorites, just take a look at my Literanista Eats Pinterest Board to see what I mean but having these in your home makes so many healthy, fresh foods even a Mojito easy to make quickly.

Enjoy!

You might also like:
Latina Cooking: Healthy & Low Fat Versions
6 Books About Food Every Latina Should Read
Have You Tried Nueva Cocina Foods Yet?
New Book: Gran Cocina
Just Say "No" to MSG - DIY Recipes for Adobo, Sofrito & Sazon
Sonia Sotomayor's Favorite Dish

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

The Dichotomy of Savages: A Movie Preview & Critique

Last week, I heard about the upcoming Oliver Stone movie, Savages, adapted from the novel by Don Winslow, about a lethal Mexican drug cartel, starring Taylor Kitsch, Blake Lively, Aaron Johnson, John Travolta, Uma Thurman, Benecio Del Toro, Salma Hayek, Emile Hirsch and Demian Bichir.

And, I thought yes, this sounds BADASS! I respect Salma Hayek and Benicio Del Toro as veteran Latino actors. I marveled at action movies Machete and Grindhouse. Then... I learned Salma would be portraying the head of the Mexican drug cartel and Benicio Del Toro is playing her macho enforcer, who kidnap Blake Lively.

Now that is sort of kickass, an empowered female lead as the head of ruthless outlaws but how many merciless drug cartels do you know of that are run by women, especially in Mexico? I know, I know, it's fiction, you're saying. But this is where the dichotomy of my internal struggle plays outs in a variety of perspectives explained below begin.

I'm glad Hollywood is putting the any spotlight on serious issues like violence, drug smuggling and corruption and bloodthirsty gangs south of the border. I'm glad Latino actors are able to have long standing careers in the media and are included in ensemble summer blockbuster films.  I'm glad authors are still cashing in on movie deals and we're seen original films on the big screen. And... It's nice that Salma isn't playing a maid or a nanny.

However, .... (and this is of course, speculative, since I have not seen the movie, and can only base my thoughts on what I've read so far) we see the same cliched tropes of the villainous, foreign Other - the merciless, brutal, and of course, hyper-sexualized - monsters with no humanity here fused with the old tired tropicalist tropes of the spitfire latina and the primitive macho exotic. Never mind, that Benicio Del Toro, who is Puerto Rican and Hayek, of dual Arab and Mexican descent, are both being portrayed, no, objectified unabated  as "Savages."

I write this not to point the obvious or air a tired argument but to open a discourse - to note that I too sometimes get sucked into these popular pan-ethnic constructions that highlight the terror of violence, corruption, and drugs and simultaneously exploit the narrative from a very racialized and gendered angle.  That I, as a latina, as a feminist, take issue with this film's concepts and framework but I will probably in all honesty, see it when it comes out this summer.

And, I know, I am probably not alone, as the country analyzes and deconstructs who gets to wear a hoodie and what exactly denotes a vicious, unwarranted crime perpetrated on a child, we should all be introspective about our own bias but we should also keep a careful eye on what the media is producing, glamorizing  and hawking as prescribed identities and their context within popular culture and society.

Wednesday, May 23, 2007

The Personal Is Political

Here's your chance, ladies and gentlemen, let them (and our future generations) know WE were there!


The Veterans History Project, is gathering volunteer interviewers—family and friends of veterans, communities and a wide variety of organizations—to record the one-of-a-kind interviews of wartime veterans, collect oral histories of America’s World War II veterans, and send them to the Project, where they are housed in the permanent collections of the Library of Congress.



To become involved, download a new Veterans History Project field kit from the Veterans History Project Web site, request the kit via e-mail at vohp@loc.gov or call the toll-free message line at (888) 371-5848.

 
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