Showing posts with label books. Show all posts
Showing posts with label books. Show all posts

Friday, November 13, 2015

#FridayReads:A House of My Own: Stories from My Life by Sandra Cisneros

The making of a Latina writer. Award-winning novelist, poet, and MacArthur Fellow Sandra Cisneros shares the stories of her life.

From the author of The House on Mango Street, a richly illustrated compilation of true stories and nonfiction pieces that, taken together, form a jigsaw autobiography—an intimate album of a beloved literary legend. 
From the Chicago neighborhoods where she grew up and set her groundbreaking The House on Mango Street to her abode in Mexico in a region where “my ancestors lived for centuries,” the places Sandra Cisneros has lived have provided inspiration for her now-classic works of fiction and poetry. But a house of her own, where she could truly take root, has eluded her. With this collection—spanning three decades, and including never-before-published work—Cisneros has come home at last.  
Ranging from the private (her parents’ loving and tempestuous marriage) to the political (a rallying cry for one woman’s liberty in Sarajevo) to the literary (a tribute to Marguerite Duras), and written with her trademark lyricism, these signature pieces recall transformative memories as well as reveal her defining artistic and intellectual influences. Poignant, honest, deeply moving, this is an exuberant celebration of a life in writing lived to the fullest.

Tuesday, February 05, 2013

Bless Me, Ultima Movie Trailer Out

Fans of this classic Mexican-American novel, will be delighted to note that the trailer for the film adaption is now out.

 “Always have the strength to live. Love life, and if despair enters your heart, look for me in the evenings when the wind is gentle and the owls sing in the hills, I shall be with you” ― Rudolfo Anaya, Bless Me Ultima

Visit Blessmeultima.com

Friday, August 03, 2012

Lit Links & Scoops

- The Plantation in Puerto Rican Popular Music


The Biggest One-Man Run Online Book Club Leader Never Reads the Books

- Boston Review’s Paula M.L. Moya did a two part interview with Junot Díaz here.

- How to brew your own hibiscus sun tea. recipe here. Cooling, and packed with antioxidants. I add: 1 tablespoon of rose hips, 1 tablespoon of elderberries, 1 tablespoon strips of orange zest too.


- They fell in love at Borders. via Salon


- 10 Latino Olympians to follow on Twitter via NBC Latino


- A smart and candid rant about confused anger, girl crushes and Sheila Heti's acclaimed novel on friendship. via Salon


- There is still time to participate in the 3rd annual Latina Week of Action for Reproductive Justice - Soy Poderosa blog carnival. Sign up here.


- Dazzling: 37 Home Library Design Ideas With a Jay-Dropping Visual and Cultural Effect (here), 

The 20 Most Beautiful Bookstores in the World (here) and Bringing Maker-Style Garage Tinkering Into the Local Library (here)


The Intercultural Self or, Race, Culture and This White Chick; Part One

- Cool KickStarter Project: A Crowdfunded Farm Brings Traditional Mexican Flavors to New York via Good.is


- Speaking of Food: Latin Eats: NYC Restaurant Week List

-  The trailer for this book includes a girl in blackface - enough said. Read the article at xoJane.


- More yum: 11 Delicious Latin food blogs you need to follow

- Some Brief Thoughts on Media Violence and Critical Literacy via PETER GUTIERREZ.


- Ten Reasons Parents Should Read Multicultural Books to Kids via Incultureparent

- How to Survive in a Interracial Relationship When You Don’t Have the Support of Your Family & Friends via Chantilly Patiño.


Coming Soon:


Now on Sundance:

 

Friday, July 13, 2012

Lit Links & Scoops


La Playa beer can - img035_72dpi
La Playa beer can (Photo: kevindean)
- Alternate Endings:  Ernest Hemingway’s great love and war novel, A Farewell to Arms, is being re-published with the inclusion of the 39, or perhaps 47, alternate endings Hemingway considered before going with what he kept.


Discovering the Rebel at the Beach via he Beach Week series on the Tiki Tiki, stories by Latina writers on La Playa.


- Is it just me? I'm tired of blog posts about interesting bookcases that feature the same bookcases I've been seeing for the last 5 years.


- NYC: Come Out & Play Festival this weekend, combines games and technology.
Also Goldstar has $50 tickets to see three-time Tony Award winning musical, FELA!


- Alisa Valdes shares 8 Tips to Help You Stop Being Defensive


- Books A'plenty: Books I Acquired Last Year for Little or No Money


- A driver refuses to prove U.S. citizenship at a checkpoint, tells police: “That’s my business.”




How Even 'Boring' Industries Can Create Interesting Content


VERONIQUE DE MIGUEL shares Recovering from domestic violence – I did it!


Updated to add:


The 20 Most Beautiful Children’s Books of All Time according to Flavorwire


- Awesome discussion on Reddit: When did we become a country where the millionaires are jealous of the people on food stamps? A country that thinks teachers and fire fighters are soaking us dry? A country that thinks the richest who are paying the lowest taxes in 80 years are the ones being beaten up? 

Wednesday, January 04, 2012

2012 International Latino Book Awards: Open for Submission

Ring the alarm, fellow bookworms! The Latino Literacy Now project is preparing for the 14th Annual International Latino Book Awards to be held in NYC on June 5, 2012, and is looking for noteworthy submissions to review. In recognition of the outstanding contributions being made to Latino literature by publishers and writers around the world, the Latino Book Awards was created in 1999. Submissions are now open for entries for books with a 2010 or 2011 publication date. Anyone may submit a book: authors, publishers, publishing industry professionals and friends of literacy. See the Entry Form for categories and qualifications. There are over 50 categories to submit your favorite book’s name and have it officially recognized and help promote literacy in the Latino community and beyond. The entry fee for the submission includes passes for 2 guests to the awards ceremony. *Latino Literacy Now is a 501(c)(3), not for profit organization dedicated to advancing the cause of literacy in the Latino community and to promoting reading as a life long pursuit for personal and professional fulfillment. Download your entry form here. Entries must be in by March 15, 2012. For more information on becoming a sponsor for the 14th annual International Latino Book Awards (ceremony & reception) contact us at jim@LBFF.us. Source: www.lbff.us

Wednesday, September 29, 2010

4th Annual Dominican Book Fair in New York

The 4th annual Dominican Book Fair in New York will be held from Friday October 1st to the 3rd at Boricua College, 155 st. and Broadway in Manhattan.
212-234-8149

"A true cultural fiesta with music, theater, cinema, arts and crafts, paintings, dance and all the colorful manifestations of the Dominican people.”

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

BookExpo America & Book Blogger Convention

Two book events in NYC in May that you need to register for now:

BookExpo America - "From the digital revolution to a new business model, the book industry is changing rapidly and BEA is changing, too...We’re offering more than ever before: more content, more events, more titles and authors—and all that means even more buzz.This year’s Autographing Area is scheduled to feature more than 500 author signings during BEA!"


Panel of particular interest:

Leading Latino Authors Are Representative of a Vibrant Market

Tuesday, May 25, 2010
3:15PM - 4:15PM

Location: Room 1B01

Every Latino author on this panel has well over 100,000 in book sales, illustrating that Latino authors do sell. This fast paced session will focus on the careers of these remarkable authors, why Latino authors don’t always receive the attention they deserve and why we will be seeing more best selling Latino authors.


If you can't make it to BEA, then check out:

The Book Blogger Convention

I had a blast at last year's BEA. See you there!

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

More Mother's Day Ideas

- If you hurry, you can still create a customized cookbook with all of Mami's recetas favoritas at http://www.tastebook.com/. You can add family photos, stories, and organize all her recipes. Not only that but you create a timeless keepsake that will inspire and touch everyone.
If you are in NYC, you can take Mami to a fabulous obra: Doña Flor Y Sus Dos Maridos



Tuesday, July 10, 2007

Borders Puts Books on your Cell

Borders is to become the world's first bookseller to distribute content to mobile phones. The retailer will send sample chapters to customers' phones free of charge before books are released and a the book can then be purchased in-store for a discount of up to 20% using a barcode.

Via: marketingweek

Sweet!

Thursday, May 24, 2007

New Book: The Virgin's Guide to Mexico


The Virgin's Guide to Mexico by Eric B. Martin

Review:
"Martin's earnestly beat novel tracks homely, studious Alma Price — resigned to being forgettable — as she disappears from her affluent Austin, Tex., home to trace her Mexican roots.

Alma deferred her freshman year at Harvard hoping to go to Spain, only to have her parents insist that if she doesn't go off to Harvard, she enroll at the University of Texas. Instead, Alma is determined to figure out how her chilly, beautiful Mexican mother, Hermelinda, managed to transform herself from a maid's daughter into a rich dot-com wife.

Armed with a year of Spanish, a lot of moxie and a cache of letters sent to her mother by her grandfather from Mexico City, Alma chops off her hair, assumes the moniker 'The Kid' and joins a gang of young American men headed for the border whorehouses. Alma's perspective emerges in a winning torrent of observations, and though a transvestite prostitute discovers her secret, she makes a pretty good boy.

Alternate chapters clarify Hermelinda's motivations for leaving Mexico and her secret tenderness for her troubled daughter, as Hermelinda and her husband (and Alma's father), Truitt, trace Alma's route to Mexico City with a detective's help. Part bildungs-road novel, part family saga and part identity lit, Martin's third novel is all heart."

- Publishers Weekly (Copyright Reed Business Information, Inc.)

Friday, April 20, 2007

Kitsch for the Kitchen


But this is the cutest, most apropo shelf for cookbooks I have ever seen!

From This Into That (via designersblock.blogspot.com/)

It would look great in my kitchen!

Wednesday, February 07, 2007

New Book: A Heart So White


From Boldtype:

The novel is, very simply, about how Juan comes to know the secret behind his aunt's suicide, and his father's role in it.”

Review:


When Javier Marías finally wins the Nobel Prize for Literature — he's perennially considered to be on the shortlist — he'll have no need to thank American readers. His international renown as a novelist for the ages rivals that of Haruki Murakami, yet despite plenty of critical attention here, Marías gets none of the love that his peer enjoys at US bookstores.

Maybe he needs some talking cats. Whereas Murakami's novels spiral outward from seemingly mundane beginnings to increasingly surreal tableaux, Marías' turn discursively inward — first, into familiar realities constructed primarily by metaphysics and language, and only second by the actions of his characters. Translation: a Marías novel is generally a slow read.

That said, A Heart So White — perhaps the best introduction to Marías' oeuvre — starts with a bang. Juan, our narrator, describes the suicide of his father's second wife, who inexplicably shot herself in the chest while her family ate lunch in the next room. Her widowed husband went on to marry her sister, Juan's mother, but the story of "the woman who would have been yet never could have been my Aunt Teresa" continues to haunt Juan, even after his own marriage. The rest of the novel is, very simply, about how Juan comes to know the secret behind his aunt's suicide, and his father's role in it.

The truth, when it comes, is astonishing not only because we could never have foreseen it, but also because it makes clear that the novel's narrator, whose method can initially seem rather aimless and inscrutable, very much has a purpose all along. Juan tells a story about a big secret by talking about little ones, limning all the different parts of ourselves that we can never explain to one another. Marías' insights into the human experience are brilliant throughout, but the depths of his artistry can't be plumbed without patience and faith on our part. Marías asks a lot of readers, but the five million who are happy to oblige him can't all be wrong.

- Chris Parris-Lamb

 
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