Showing posts with label United States. Show all posts
Showing posts with label United States. Show all posts

Friday, January 31, 2014

#FridayReads: Thirteen Ways of Looking at Latino Art

Out next month, in Thirteen Ways of Looking at Latino Art Paperback, the essayist and cultural commentator Ilan Stavans and the analytic philosopher Jorge J. E. Gracia share long-standing interests in the intersection of art and ideas. Here they take thirteen pieces of Latino art, each reproduced in color, as occasions for thematic discussions. 

Whether the work at the center of a particular conversation is a triptych created by the brothers Einar and Jamex de la Torre, Andrés Serrano's controversial Piss Christ, a mural by the graffiti artist BEAR TCK, or Above All Things, a photograph by María Magdalena Campos-Pons, Stavans and Gracia's exchanges inevitably open out to literature, history, ethics, politics, religion, and visual culture more broadly. 

Autobiographical details pepper Stavans and Gracia's conversations, as one or the other tells what he finds meaningful in a given work. Sparkling with insight, their exchanges allow the reader to eavesdrop on two celebrated intellectuals—worldly, erudite, and unafraid to disagree—as they reflect on the pleasures of seeing.

Ilan Stavans is Lewis-Sebring Professor in Latin American and Latino Culture at Amherst College. He has written, edited, and translated many books, including Spanglish: The Making of a New American Language, The Poetry of Pablo Neruda, and The Norton Anthology of Latino Literature. 

 Jorge J. E. Gracia is Samuel P. Capen Chair and SUNY Distinguished Professor of Philosophy and Comparative Literature at the State University of New York at Buffalo. His many books include Painting Borges: Philosophy Interpreting Art Interpreting Literature, Images of Thought: Philosophical Interpretations of Carlos Estévez's Art, and Latinos in America: Philosophy and Social Identity.

Friday, December 06, 2013

#FridayReads: An Afro-Latina Book List

Inspired by Melissa Harris-Perry's black feminism syllabus over at Feministing I've put together a version geared toward the specific experiences of being both black and Hispanic in the U.S.A and beyond.


  1. Afro-Latin America, 1800-2000 by George Reid Andrews 
  2. Daughters of the Stone: A Novel by Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa  
  3. Afro-Latino Voices: Narratives from the Early Modern Ibero-Atlantic World, 1550-1812 by Kathryn Joy McKnight 
  4. The Afro-Latin@ Reader: History and Culture in the United States by Miriam Jiménez Román 
  5. Women Warriors of the Afro-Latina Diaspora by Marta Moreno Vega
  6. Black in Latin America by Henry Louis Gates Jr. 
  7. The African Presence in Santo Domingo by Carlos Andujar 
  8. Latining America: Black-Brown Passages and the Coloring of Latino/a Studies by Claudia Milian  
  9. Unbecoming Blackness: The Diaspora Cultures of Afro-Cuban America by Antonio Lopez 
  10. The African Experience in Spanish America by Leslie B., Jr. Rout 
  11. Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil by Edward E. Telles 
  12. Reyita: The Life of a Black Cuban Woman in the Twentieth Century by Maria De Los Reyes Castillo Bueno, Daisy Rubiera Castillo, Anne McLean 
  13. Autobiography of a Slave Autobiografia de un esclavo by Juan Francisco 
  14. Down These Mean Streets by Piri Thomas
  15. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz 
  16. Black Skin, White Masks by Frantz Fanon and Richard Philcox
  17. Women Writing Resistance: Essays on Latin America and the Caribbean by Jennifer Browdy de Hernandez, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat and Michelle Cliff
  18. Island Beneath the Sea: A Novel by Isabel Allende
  19. Negras in Brazil: Re-envisioning Black Women, Citizenship, and the Politics of Identity by Professor Kia Lilly Caldwell 
  20. Racial Politics in Post-Revolutionary Cuba by Mark Q. Sawyer
  21. Blacks and Blackness in Central America: Between Race and Place Paperback by Lowell Gudmundson, Justin Wolfe  
  22. Blackness and Race Mixture: The Dynamics of Racial Identity in Colombia by Peter Wade 
  23. Yo Soy Negro: Blackness in Peru by Tanya Maria Golash-Boza 
  24. Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won: Afro-Brazilians in Post-Abolition SÏ€o Paolo and Salvador by Kim D. Butler
  25. Race and Ethnicity in Latin America by Peter Wade
  26. Black behind the Ears: Dominican Racial Identity from Museums to Beauty Shops by Ginetta E. B. Candelario
  27. Black and Green: Afro-Colombians, Development, and Nature in the Pacific Lowlands by Kiran Asher
  28. Land of the Cosmic Race: Race Mixture, Racism, and Blackness in Mexico by Christina A. Sue
  29. Black Mexico: Race and Society from Colonial to Modern Times by Ben Vinson 
  30. Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
  31. Yemoja: Gender, Sexuality, and Creativity in the Latina by Solimar Otero, Toyin Falola 
  32. Neither Enemies nor Friends: Latinos, Blacks, Afro-Latinos by Anani Dzidzienyo
  33. Afrodescendants, Identity, and the Struggle for Development in the Americas by Bernd Reiter
  34. Mulattas and Mestizas: Representing Mixed Identities in the Americas, 1850-2000 by Suzanne Bost
What would you add? Let me know especially fiction and literature...



Friday, November 15, 2013

#FridayReads: For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet's Journey by Richard Blanco

For All of Us, One Today is a fluid, poetic account of Richard Blanco's life-changing experiences as the inaugural poet in 2013. In this brief and evocative narrative, he shares the story of the call from the White House committee and all the exhilaration and upheaval of the days that followed. 

For the first time, he reveals the inspiration and challenges—including his experiences as a Latino immigrant and gay man—behind the creation of the inaugural poem, "One Today," as well as two other poems commissioned for the occasion ("Mother Country" and "What We Know of Country"), published here for the first time ever, alongside translations of all three of those poems into his native Spanish. Finally, Blanco reflects on his new role as a public voice, his vision for poetry's place in our nation's consciousness, his spiritual embrace of Americans everywhere, and his renewed understanding of what it means to be an American as a result of the inauguration. 

 Like the inaugural poem itself, For All of Us, One Today speaks to what makes this country and its people great, marking a historic moment of hope and promise in our evolving American landscape. 


Richard Blanco
 (Photo: pennstatenews)
Selected by President Obama to be the fifth inaugural poet in history, Richard Blanco is the youngest, first Latino, first immigrant, and first openly gay person to serve in the role. The negotiation of cultural identity and universal themes of place and belonging characterize his three collections of poetry—City of a Hundred Fires, Directions to The Beach of the Dead, and Looking for The Gulf Motel. Blanco is a fellow of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow. He lives in Bethel, Maine.

Friday, September 27, 2013

#FridayReads: The Beast by Oscar Martinez

One day a couple of years ago, 300 migrants were kidnapped between the remote, dusty border towns of Altar, Mexico, and Sasabe, Arizona. Over half of them were never heard from again. Óscar Martínez, a young writer from El Salvador, was in Altar at the time of the abduction, and his story of the migrant disappearances is only one of the harrowing stories he tells after spending two years traveling up and down the migrant trail from Central America to the US border in The Beast: Riding the Rails and Dodging Narcos on the Migrant Trail


More than a quarter of a million Central Americans alone make this increasingly dangerous journey each year, and last year 18,000 of them were kidnapped.

Martínez writes in beautiful, lyrical prose about clinging to the tops of freight trains; finding respite, work and hardship in shelters and brothels; and riding shotgun with the border patrol. Here is the first book to illuminate this harsh mass migration in the age of the narcotraficantes.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

A Literary Guide to National Hispanic Heritage Month

The kind folks at Open Road Media sent this great infographic over  guide you through the plethora of great reads, highlighting top picks in fiction, memoir, children’s, mystery, and more. spotlighting literature and stories that explore Hispanic themes. Don’t know where to begin?

"Gabriel García Márquez. Frida Kahlo. Christopher Columbus. Pablo Picasso. These are just a few of the countless men and women that have inspired and shaped American art, culture, and politics. Like their forbearers, Hispanic and Latino Americans continue to contribute to the rich fabric of the United States in innumerable ways, from the literature of Isabelle Allende to the music of Carlos Santana."


































See full size

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Aromatic Water: Rose Recipes & Agua Florida

Last week, I saw a post for 20 Unusual Uses for Rose Water and it reminded me of the recipes in Like Water for Chocolate by Mexican novelist Laura Esquivel, and also of the Agua Florida that my aunts splashed around the house (and everything else) back in the day - which my mom detested.

Cover of "Like Water for Chocolate"

Recipe: Rose Petal Sauce for Hens

* Makes 6 servings

12 red or pink organic roses' petals
1 cup chopped walnuts 
3 cups chicken broth, or as needed (I use the No Sodium, organic type)
2 tablespoons honey, or to taste
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter (I switched to Coconut Oil)
4 cloves garlic, minced
1 pinch salt and freshly ground black pepper
3/4 teaspoon ground anise seed
3 prickly pears (cactus fruit, Nopal), peeled and chopped (tasted like Watermelon)

Directions

- Melt the butter in a saucepan over low heat. Add garlic, and saute until fragrant, 2 or 3 minutes. Season with salt, pepper and anise, and cook for another minute to blend the flavors.
- In the container of a blender or food processor, combine the prickly pears, rose petals (reserving a few for garnish) and walnuts. Pour in just enough broth to cover. Cover, and process until smooth.
- Pour the rose petal mixture into the saucepan with the garlic. Cook over medium heat for about 10 minutes, stirring gently. If the sauce is too thick, add more broth as needed. Mix in the honey, then taste and adjust seasoning with more salt and pepper or anise if desired. Serve poured over poultry, garnishing with a few rose petals.

Via AllRecipes

THE ONE AND ONLY: Agua de Florida - Murray y L...
 (Photo : youflavio)
For those of you not familiar with Agua Florida or Florida Water, I found this guide very interesting.

It's been around since 1808 and has been used for spiritual cleansing in addition to being used as fragrance just as long.

Do remember this in your house?

Sunday, July 14, 2013

Free eBook: Why America Is Losing the Global Race to Capture Entrepreneurial Talent

With "smart immigration" still in the headlines, the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation is offering a free ebook to help more people understand the issues related to immigrant entrepreneurs and how current policies affect this important economic force in America.

In his pivotal book, The Immigrant Exodus: Why America Is Losing the Global Race to Capture Entrepreneurial Talent, Vivek Wadhwa, a leading scholar and public voice on entrepreneurship and public policy, draws on fifty years of research and his Kauffman Foundation report, "America's New Immigrant Entrepreneurs - Then and Now," to show that growth in immigrant entrepreneurship in the United States has peaked, is stagnating, and is on the verge of decline.

This looming decline is historically unprecedented, and has huge implications for the already-ailing U.S. economy.

Wadhwa's ebook is available for free download from now through July 22, 2013 here: Kauffman.org

Monday, July 08, 2013

REBEL: A Woman In Battle

Rebel, a new documentary explores the Secret Life of Loreta Velazquez -- Cuban immigrant, Confederate Soldier turned Union Spy. REBEL will premiere in New York on WNET on Sunday, July 21 at 7PM or you can watch the full length film here.

REBEL is based on Loreta’s 600-page memoir, A Woman In Battle, which caused a sensation when it was published in 1876 and remains in print to this day. For over a century, Loreta was dismissed as a liar and a prostitute, but new evidence indicates she was no hoax. 

“Loreta’s memoir gives us rare insight into war from a woman and a Latina’s point of view. She was an immigrant serving her country by fighting for it, as so many generations have done. Growing up in New Orleans she naturally aligned herself with the South and even kept a slave, but records show she would end up spying for the North. 

She was a complex woman who ultimately turned against war as a solution to the world’s problems,” says writer/director María Agui Carter. Although Loreta’s memoir, which most historians acknowledge to be somewhat embellished, was dismissed as a hoax for over a century, historians have recently discovered documents in the National Archives as well as newspaper articles and letters proving that she did indeed exist. “Loreta Velazquez was a rebel who flouted all the rules to become a part of American history,” says Ms. Agui Carter.



Thursday, July 04, 2013

Become a part of the LATINO AMERICANS PBS project

LATINO AMERICANS is a landmark six-hour documentary featuring interviews with nearly 100 Latinos and more than 500 years of History, narrated by actor Benjamin Bratt, will air nationally on PBS on three consecutive Tuesdays, premiering on September 17, September 24 and October 1.

Become a part of the LATINO AMERICANS project. Make a video describing what being Latino means to you, share your family traditions, tell us how you celebrate your heritage and culture or let us know about your role models. Share your story and become part of #LatinosPBS.

Get the DVR ready!

 




Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Monday, June 17, 2013

2013 Book List Pt II: What to Read this Summer

In case these 11 new reads weren't enough to last through the summer, here's a few more books you might definitely want to check out soon:

This Is Paradise: Stories by Kristiana Kahakauwila 
Elegant, brutal, and profound—this magnificent debut captures the grit and glory of modern Hawai'i with breathtaking force and accuracy.

Hydrant
(Photo: Zantony)
It's Not Love, It's Just Paris by Patricia Engel
Lita del Cielo, the daughter of two Colombian orphans who arrived in America with nothing and made a fortune with their Latin food empire, has been granted one year to pursue her studies in Paris before returning to work in the family business. She moves into a gently crumbling Left Bank mansion known as “The House of Stars,” where a spirited but bedridden Countess Séraphine rents out rooms to young women visiting Paris to work, study, and, unofficially, to find love.

Loteria: A Novel By Mario Alberto Zambrano 
In Lotería, the spellbinding literary debut by Mario Alberto Zambrano, a young girl tells the story of her family’s tragic demise using a deck of cards of the eponymous Latin American game of chance.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Fearless, gripping, at once darkly funny and tender, spanning three continents and numerous lives, Americanah is a richly told story set in today’s globalized world: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s most powerful and astonishing novel yet.

The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker 
Marvelous and compulsively readable, Helene Wecker's debut novel The Golem and the Jinni weaves strands of Yiddish and Middle Eastern literature, historical fiction and magical fable, into a wondrously inventive and unforgettable tale.

Lexicon By Max Barry 
Sci-fi and Matrix fans will enjoy Max Barry’s most spellbinding and ambitious novel yet, Lexicon is a brilliant thriller that explores language, power, identity, and our capacity to love—whatever the cost.


 
Web Analytics