Showing posts with label Spanish. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Spanish. Show all posts

Saturday, October 19, 2013

How to Make your own Flavored Achiote Oil

Recently, I received a bottle of Olive Oil from Iberia. Iberia, is a manufacturer of packaged foods, specializing in Latin cuisine. Iberia offers a wide variety of food & beverage products (EVOO, olives, rice, beans) to specialty ‘foodie’ products (aioli, blended oils, paella packets) … the list goes on.

It is a such a pretty bottle design and packaging that I didn't want to just put it away in a cabinet. I instantly thought of the achiote oil that both my mom and my sister, although my sister more so always uses to make her food look and taste amazing. Achiote oil is commonly used in Puerto Rican cuisine and gives food a sweet but nutty peppery taste.

Historically it has been valued for its coloring properties and used for body paint and even a predecessor to lipstick. It's been also been used as traditional folk medicine and in addition to being high in antioxidants and  tocotrienols (belied to prevent cancer), it has antimicrobial properties. Of course, we all know that comsuming good quality olive oil on a daily basis, more commonly known as the Mediterranean diet has been shown to cut the risk of heart attacks and strokes by 30 percent.

DIY Achiote Oil

Chef Daisy Martinez has a pretty simple recipe here. You just heat up some achiote seeds (also referred to as annatto seeds) in the olive oil, watch carefully until the start to fizzle and then remove, cool and store. Your oil will turn an amazing reddish color and you can use it to make your rice yellow and your empanadas a golden brown.

Credit: Girliechef.com
My mom always uses a bit in her pasteles and her food is amazing. Rub a little of this on any meat you roast and it will come out looking Martha Stewart-worthy. Let me know what you think of it or if you use it.

Here's a fun video from Chef Don Davis walking you through Iberia products.


Friday, June 21, 2013

5 Classic Mexican Horror Films You Can Watch Online

I've been meaning to share this list here for almost a year now since writing about my uncle, the movie projectionist.

While researching Mexican films, for the Macario post, I came across a bounty of full length, black and white, scary movies that you can watch online. Perfect for a stormy movie night!

The very first Mexican horror movie was based in what is definitely Mexico's best known ghost story:1933's "La Llorona", the crying woman

 

"La Llorona" begins in modern day Mexico (in the 30s), at the birthday party of the son of Dr. Ricardo De Acuna (Ramón Pereda) and his wife Ana (Virginia Zurí). Everything is fun for the kids, but Ana and her father Don Fernando De Moncada (Paco Martínez) are worried about an ancient curse that hangs over their family, in which is stated that the first son of a Moncada will die horribly as a child, victim of "La Llorona". 

As a man of science, Ricardo doesn't believe in this, so Don Fernando begins to narrate the dark origins of the legend, beginning with the story of Ana Xicontencatl (Adriana Lamar), a noble princess of Aztec heritage who gets romantically involved with a womanizing Spaniard named Rodrigo De Cortéz (Alberto Martí) in the times of Colonial Mexico. However the Moncada curse goes beyond the years of Spanish rule over Mexico. via W-Cinema




The Hell of Frankenstein is an odd four-part TV mini series stitched together into the story of a mad scientist, who creates a remote-controlled monster and sends it to terrorize the city.




Mysteries of Black Magic: A stage magician, pitted against woman in peril; her lover is the hero. In a crypt, a woman and her assistant keep the revered body of their contemporary warlock-master whose sexual jealousy triggers the climax as the witch falls for the Hero and abducts him.



The Skeleton of Mrs. Morales is a 1960 Mexican black comedy film based on Arthur Machen's 1927 short story "The Islington Mystery". It is regarded by critics as one of the ten best Mexican films of all time. via Wikipedia



Macario is a 1960 Mexican supernatural drama film directed by Roberto Gavaldón and starring Ignacio López Tarso. It was the first Mexican film to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Film in a Foreign Language. The story centers on Macario, a poor indigenous woodcutter, during Colonial Mexico, who lives enraged for being so poor.It is based off of the story of brothers Grimm Godfather Death. via Wikipedia

Friday, February 27, 2009

Even in Spanish Vampires are Hot

The Twilight Saga (Crepúsculo) Sells Over 2.5 Million Copies In Spanish


"Alfaguara, an imprint of Santillana, has published the series in the Spanish market, including the United States and Latin America. The entire saga: Crepúsculo, Luna Nueva, Eclipse, Amanecer, and the movie companion Crepúsculo: El libro oficial de la película has sold over two and a half million copies. Sales throughout the world, in 39 countries, total forty-two million copies."

Amazing!

Tuesday, December 02, 2008

December Bareness

How like a winter hath my absence been. From thee, the pleasure of the fleeting year! What freezings have I felt, what dark days seen, What old December's bareness everywhere!.
-- Shakespeare, WilliamOn Absence from Quotations Book

Winter and the holidays are amongst us once again - and just like last year - I feel like bah, humbug! I really don't care for the cold weather (I am always cold even in the tropics) and the consumerism, gluttony and overindulgence of the season really revulse me.

This year I've made a plan and I am sticking to it. I'm getting fewer gifts and have really snipped the gift budget for almost everyone. I feel slightly anxious that the recipients will be dissapointed since they are accustomed to being showered with stuff but this time I really reigning myself in come what may.

It's not just the recession either. I want meaning and thoughtfulness to come accross - not here's this loofah or candle (because I had to get you something, you're picky and so I just gave up) sometimes I want stuff that money can't buy.
Many are suggesting books this year as the perfect gift and I couldn't agree more. Even there though, I want the insight to come accross - don't get someone a book because they like books so here's a couple to keep you busy - get someone a book that has meaning. Perhaps this is your favorite book or a favorite author's favorite, maybe it changed your life, maybe you read this book when you were that person's age, or maybe you loved it and so will they, maybe it's a biography of their hero or a topic that fascinates them... We could go on forever.

And, while I usually don't condone writing inside books (or god forbid, margins) I've always loved getting books with signed messages on the inside cover/flap. Even as a child, I loved opening a book and seeing the message that reminded me that Titi gave it to me for my birthday and so I always leave a message for the recipient inside the book - a little piece to remind them of the memory and a little bit of my love to treasure.

Anyway, before we get to sappy here - I just wanted to say in a world where people get trampled to death or shot over material items - let's keep things in perspective, that TV or that Wii may only last a dozen years (if that) while a meaningful gift like a book or an experience (like a trip) will last forever and keep on giving.

Lastly, here's a roundup of interesting internet tiding:

- Best Book Covers of 2008 via BoingBoing & My Favorite Book Covers of 2008 (via Kottke)


- A new blog launched that covers babybooks: Readertotz and if you like that, then you'll love lookybook.com


- Hate crimes targeting Latinos increased again in 2007, capping a 40% rise in the four years since 2003, according to FBI statistics released this fall.

- Congrats to author and Congresswoman Linda Sanchez, who is expecting a baby. full story here

- Some variations on the books=gifts trend: An Author's Holiday Wish List by Sofia Quintero via her blog, "Buy a Book by Somebody Black and Give it to Somebody Not Black Month" via eisaulen.com-


- The Latinidad List via marcelalandres.com

Literary Fiction – The Gifted Gabaldon Sisters by Lorraine Lopez
Every character is simultaneously original and familiar.Poetry
– Unfinished Portrait by Luivette Resto
Grounded in the reality that is the U.S. Latino experience.
Chick Lit – More Than This by Margo Candela
Though a happy ending is certain, you can't wait to get there.
Thriller – Gunmetal Black by Daniel Serrano
If Elmore Leonard were Nuyorican this is the novel he would write.
History – A Universal History of the Destruction of Books by Fernando Baez
Mind candy for the brainiacs in your life.
Lifestyle – Practically Posh by Robyn Moreno
Thrifty tips on living well, perfect for our tough economic times.
Cookbook – Simply Delicioso by Ingrid Hoffman
Fun and flavorful everyday meals that won't take all day to cook.
Young Adult – Amor and Summer Secrets by Diana Rodriguez Wallach
A Philadelphia princess goes to Puerto Rico and finds her Latinidad.
Middle Grade – The Smell of Old Lady Perfume by Claudia Guadalupe Martinez
The original title gives a glimpse of the poetic lines peppered throughout this poignant debut.
Picture Book - Sergio Makes a Splash by Edel Rodriguez
Finally—a charming tale that doesn't involve abuelitas, tamales or pinatas.


- A new book review site launched: www.ReaderSpoils.com. I believe you receive giftcards for each review you post.

- Guanabee Meets The Accidental Santera Author, Irete Lazo & notes California Man Richard Soto Keeps A Library Of Latino History In His Own Basement

- A new English news site launched with a Hispanic focus: www.latinoffice.com

- Long time friend of Literanista, Juan Tornoe has a post on hac360.blogs.cnn.com

The Book Review posted its list of 100 Notable Books for 2008

- Here the Hachette Gift Giving Guide:
http://www.hachettebookgroup.com/books_seasonal.aspx & the www.bookreporter.com one

- Catalan novelist Juan Marsé won the $158,625 Cervantes prize, "the Spanish-language equivalent of the Nobel prize for literature," via the Guardian.

- Books Authors Want (and Plan to Give) for the Holidays via OpenCulture, includes what Julia Alvarez, author of In the Time of the Butterflies, wants to get and plans to give.

- Also, don't make the Pumpkin Coconut pie listed in the previous post unless you put a twist on it. I made two for T-day and they had absolutely no flavor. I'm thinking that the recipe need some ground cloves, cinnamon or something.

- The Triumph of Roberto Bolaño via NY Review of Books

- Shout out to gwenworld.com. Gwendolyn Zepeda has a new book out in Janaury, Houston, We Have a Problema

- Author Junot Diaz Shares Thanksgiving Memories

- "It’s Toni Morrison. Like Isabel Allende, her writing is so beautiful that you can sing her words (seriously, try it) " from 5 good things (and 5 bad ones) about Toni Morrison’s ‘A Mercy’ via writeblack.com

- books for the boy that does not read Part I & part-2

- New Interview with Editor, Adriana Dominguez by author Jeff Rivera


- I'm participating in Operation Santa and so should you!


Finally, here's a little something to put all of us in a holiday mood:

Thursday, June 07, 2007

First-ever Spanish-language Presidential Debate

They really want our votes, huh?

The two Spanish-speaking Democratic candidates, New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson and Connecticut Sen. Chris Dodd, jumped at the opportunity this week to debate in Spanish on the Univision television network.

Via thehill.com/

Thursday, May 10, 2007

Brush Up or Learn Spanish!


The BBC offers quality FREE online and MP3 education in languages familiar and obscure, including French, German, Portuguese, Mandarin, Greek, Urdu and of course Espanol.


These are easy-to-use, enjoyable podcasts that allow you to learn while you do errands or go for a run.


However, classes are one size fits all, which fast learners may find sluggish (and slow learners may find difficult).


 
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