Showing posts with label South America. Show all posts
Showing posts with label South America. Show all posts

Friday, October 18, 2013

#FridayReads: At Night We Walk in Circles: A Novel by Daniel Alarcon

Out at the end of the month:


At Night We Walk in Circles: A Novel by Daniel Alarcon  is described as a breakout book from a prizewinning young writer: a breathtaking, suspenseful story of one man’s obsessive search to find the truth of another man’s downfall:

Nelson’s life is not turning out the way he hoped. His girlfriend is sleeping with another man, his brother has left their South American country, leaving Nelson to care for their widowed mother, and his acting career can’t seem to get off the ground. That is, until he lands a starring role in a touring revival of The Idiot President, a legendary play by Nelson’s hero, Henry Nunez, leader of the storied guerrilla theater troupe Diciembre. And that’s when the real trouble begins.

The tour takes Nelson out of the shelter of the city and across a landscape he’s never seen, which still bears the scars of the civil war. With each performance, Nelson grows closer to his fellow actors, becoming hopelessly entangled in their complicated lives, until, during one memorable performance, a long-buried betrayal surfaces to force the troupe into chaos.


Nelson’s fate is slowly revealed through the investigation of the narrator, a young man obsessed with Nelson’s story—and perhaps closer to it than he lets on. In sharp, vivid, and beautiful prose, Alarcón delivers a compulsively readable narrative and a provocative meditation on fate, identity, and the large consequences that can result from even our smallest choices.


English: Writer Daniel Alarcón at the Mercanti...
 (Photo: Wikipedia)
Daniel Alarcón is author of the critically-acclaimed story collection War by Candlelight, and the novel Lost City Radio, winner of the 2009 International Literature Prize. His writing has appeared in Granta, n+1, and Harper’s, and he has been named one of The New Yorker’s “20 Under 40.” Alarcón is Executive Producer of Radio Ambulante, a Spanish-language storytelling podcast, and he lives in San Francisco

Friday, July 26, 2013

#FridayReads: The Sound of Things Falling by Juan Gabriel Vasquez

Juan Gabriel Vásquez has been hailed not only as one of South America’s greatest literary stars, but also as one of the most acclaimed writers of his generation. In this gorgeously wrought, award-winning novel, Vásquez confronts the history of his home country, Colombia.

In the city of Bogotá, Antonio Yammara reads an article about a hippo that had escaped from a derelict zoo once owned by legendary Colombian drug kingpin Pablo Escobar. The article transports Antonio back to when the war between Escobar’s Medellín cartel and government forces played out violently in Colombia’s streets and in the skies above. Back then, Antonio witnessed a friend’s murder, an event that haunts him still. As he investigates, he discovers the many ways in which his own life and his friend’s family have been shaped by his country’s recent violent past. His journey leads him all the way back to the 1960s and a world on the brink of change: a time before narco-trafficking trapped a whole generation in a living nightmare.

Vásquez is “one of the most original new voices of Latin American literature,” according to Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa, and The Sound of Things Falling is his most personal, most contemporary novel to date, a masterpiece that takes his writing—and will take his literary star—even higher.

Juan Gabriel Vásquez is a critically acclaimed Colombian writer, translator, and award-winning author of a collection of stories Los amantes de Todos los Santos, as well as the novels Historia secreta de Costaguana and The Informers, which has been translated into seven languages. He has translated works by Victor Hugo, E.M Foster and John Hersey, among others, his essay “El arte de la distorsión” won the Premio Nacional Simón Bolívar, and he is a regular columnist for El Espectador, the newspaper of dissent in Bogotá. Educated in Colombia, and in Paris at the Sorbonne, he now lives and teaches in Barcelona, Spain with his wife and twin daughters.


Monday, July 16, 2012

Literacy Campaign in Peru: There's a Man Stuck in My ATM

This clever literacy campaign in Peru, displays an illegible message when you pop your plastic in and while you try to decipher it - this PSA pops up.



Friday, July 24, 2009

Growing Up with an Argentinian Dad

Cover of "The Impostor's Daughter: A True...
Cover of The Impostor's Daughter: A True Memoir
In The Impostor's Daughter: A True Memoir by Laurie Sandell, she"recounts the gradual realization that her charming, larger-than-life Argentine father, bragging of war metals, degrees from prestigious universities and acquaintances with famous people, had lied egregiously to his family about his past and accomplishments." (via Publishers Weekly)

Composed as stunning graphic novel by Laurie Sandell, who is a journalist and published cartoonist, it is guaranteed to both delight you and mesmerize you.

Laurie Sandell grew up in Stockton, California, then lived in upstate New York, and has traveled the world: Jerusalem, Tokyo, Egypt, Jordan, backpacked all over Europe and then ended up going full circle back to Buenos Aires.

She now lives in Brooklyn and is a contributing editor at Glamour Magazine.

She will guest post on Literanista on Sunday!
 
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