Showing posts with label Slavery. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Slavery. Show all posts

Monday, January 28, 2013

New Book: Sugar in the Blood: A Family's Story of Slavery and Empire

I love this clever new title: Sugar in the Blood: A Family's Story of Slavery and Empire by Andrea Stuart


In the late 1630s, lured by the promise of the New World, Andrea Stuart’s earliest known maternal ancestor, George Ashby, set sail from England to settle in Barbados. He fell into the life of a sugar plantation owner by mere chance, but by the time he harvested his first crop, a revolution was fully under way: the farming of sugar cane, and the swiftly increasing demands for sugar worldwide, would not only lift George Ashby from abject poverty and shape the lives of his descendants, but it would also bind together ambitious white entrepreneurs and enslaved black workers in a strangling embrace. 
Stuart uses her own family story—from the seventeenth century through the present—as the pivot for this epic tale of migration, settlement, survival, slavery and the making of the Americas. 
As it grew, the sugar trade enriched Europe as never before, financing the Industrial Revolution and fuelling the Enlightenment. And, as well, it became the basis of many economies in South America, played an important part in the evolution of the United States as a world power and transformed the Caribbean into an archipelago of riches. 
But this sweet and hugely profitable trade—“white gold,” as it was known—had profoundly less palatable consequences in its precipitation of the enslavement of Africans to work the fields on the islands and, ultimately, throughout the American continents. Interspersing the tectonic shifts of colonial history with her family’s experience, Stuart explores the interconnected themes of settlement, sugar and slavery with extraordinary subtlety and sensitivity. 
In examining how these forces shaped her own family—its genealogy, intimate relationships, circumstances of birth, varying hues of skin—she illuminates how her family, among millions of others like it, in turn transformed the society in which they lived, and how that interchange continues to this day. Shifting between personal and global history, Stuart gives us a deepened understanding of the connections between continents, between black and white, between men and women, between the free and the enslaved. 
It is a story brought to life with riveting and unparalleled immediacy, a story of fundamental importance to the making of our world.
 Andrea Stuart was born and raised in the Caribbean. She studied English at the University of East Anglia and French at the Sorbonne. Her book The Rose of Martinique: A Life of Napoleon’s Josephine was published in the United States in 2004, has been translated into three languages and won the Enid McLeod Literary Prize. Stuart’s work has been published in numerous anthologies, newspapers and magazines, and she regularly reviews books for The Independent. She has also worked as a TV producer.

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Don't Miss Black in Latin America on PBS: Spring 2011

Travel with Dr. Henry Louis Gates, Jr. across Latin America to explore what happens when African and Hispanic worlds meet. Four-part series.

BLACK IN LATIN AMERICA
Tuesdays, April 19-May 10, 2011, 8:00-9:00 p.m. ET
In countries from Brazil to Cuba to Peru and Mexico, the question of race is being discussed and debated, as questions of racial identity are brought to the forefront of national debates, often for the first time.

Is it possible that the more than 230 million Latin Americans whose roots reach back to Africa might soon follow the example set by the USA, voting one of their "own" people into power? Is there really pan Afro-American agenda that connects people across Portuguese, Spanish and French speaking countries? Is there really an African way of life in the Americas?

Episode One: Haiti & the Dominican Republic:

An Island Divided In Haiti, Professor Gates tells the story of the birth of the first-ever black republic and finds out how the slaves’ hard-fought liberation over Napoleon Bonaparte’s French Empire became a double-edged sword. In the Dominican Republic, Professor Gates explores how race has been socially constructed in a society whose people reflect centuries of inter-marriage and how the country’s troubled history with Haiti informs notions about racial classification.

Episode Two: Cuba: The Next Revolution

In Cuba, Professor Gates finds out how the culture, religion, politics, and music of this Island are inextricably linked to the huge amount of slave labor imported to produce its enormously profitable 19th-century sugar industry and how race and racism have fared since Fidel Castro’s Communist revolution in 1959.

Episode Three: Brazil: A Racial Paradise?

In Brazil, Professor Gates delves behind the façade of Carnival to discover how this ‘rainbow nation’ is waking up to its legacy as the world’s largest slave economy.

Episode Four: Mexico & Peru: A Hidden Race

In Mexico and Peru, Professor Gates explores the almost unknown history of the significant numbers of black people—the two countries together received far more slaves than did the United State —brought to these countries as early as the 16th and 17th centuries and the worlds of culture that their descendants have created in Vera Cruz on the Gulf of Mexico, the Costa Chica region on the Pacific, and in and around Lima, Peru.

The companion book, Black in Latin America, written by Professor Gates, will be published in 2011 by NYU Press.

Thursday, August 06, 2009

Identity Entanglement

In her lecture, "Belonging to Britain", Hazel Carby looks at the historic relationship between England and Jamaica, including the history of the slave trade in Bristol and the complex question of identity for those of mixed British and West Indian heritage. Carby is a professor of African American Studies and American Studies at Yale University. Born in Britain of Jamaican and Welsh parentage, she has broadened the range of African American scholarship by situating it in the larger context of the international black diaspora.


Thursday, February 26, 2009

Margarita Engle, first Latina recipient of the Newbery Award

Great interview:

Guanabee Interviews Margarita Engle, Newbery Award-Winning Author Of The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom.

Margarita Engle is also the 2009 winner of the Pura Belpré Author Award, which honors Latino authors whose work best portrays, affirms and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in children’s books.
















Congrats, Margarita!
 
Web Analytics