Showing posts with label Racism. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Racism. Show all posts

Friday, December 06, 2013

#FridayReads: An Afro-Latina Book List

Inspired by Melissa Harris-Perry's black feminism syllabus over at Feministing I've put together a version geared toward the specific experiences of being both black and Hispanic in the U.S.A and beyond.


  1. Afro-Latin America, 1800-2000 by George Reid Andrews 
  2. Daughters of the Stone: A Novel by Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa  
  3. Afro-Latino Voices: Narratives from the Early Modern Ibero-Atlantic World, 1550-1812 by Kathryn Joy McKnight 
  4. The Afro-Latin@ Reader: History and Culture in the United States by Miriam Jiménez Román 
  5. Women Warriors of the Afro-Latina Diaspora by Marta Moreno Vega
  6. Black in Latin America by Henry Louis Gates Jr. 
  7. The African Presence in Santo Domingo by Carlos Andujar 
  8. Latining America: Black-Brown Passages and the Coloring of Latino/a Studies by Claudia Milian  
  9. Unbecoming Blackness: The Diaspora Cultures of Afro-Cuban America by Antonio Lopez 
  10. The African Experience in Spanish America by Leslie B., Jr. Rout 
  11. Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil by Edward E. Telles 
  12. Reyita: The Life of a Black Cuban Woman in the Twentieth Century by Maria De Los Reyes Castillo Bueno, Daisy Rubiera Castillo, Anne McLean 
  13. Autobiography of a Slave Autobiografia de un esclavo by Juan Francisco 
  14. Down These Mean Streets by Piri Thomas
  15. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz 
  16. Black Skin, White Masks by Frantz Fanon and Richard Philcox
  17. Women Writing Resistance: Essays on Latin America and the Caribbean by Jennifer Browdy de Hernandez, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat and Michelle Cliff
  18. Island Beneath the Sea: A Novel by Isabel Allende
  19. Negras in Brazil: Re-envisioning Black Women, Citizenship, and the Politics of Identity by Professor Kia Lilly Caldwell 
  20. Racial Politics in Post-Revolutionary Cuba by Mark Q. Sawyer
  21. Blacks and Blackness in Central America: Between Race and Place Paperback by Lowell Gudmundson, Justin Wolfe  
  22. Blackness and Race Mixture: The Dynamics of Racial Identity in Colombia by Peter Wade 
  23. Yo Soy Negro: Blackness in Peru by Tanya Maria Golash-Boza 
  24. Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won: Afro-Brazilians in Post-Abolition SÏ€o Paolo and Salvador by Kim D. Butler
  25. Race and Ethnicity in Latin America by Peter Wade
  26. Black behind the Ears: Dominican Racial Identity from Museums to Beauty Shops by Ginetta E. B. Candelario
  27. Black and Green: Afro-Colombians, Development, and Nature in the Pacific Lowlands by Kiran Asher
  28. Land of the Cosmic Race: Race Mixture, Racism, and Blackness in Mexico by Christina A. Sue
  29. Black Mexico: Race and Society from Colonial to Modern Times by Ben Vinson 
  30. Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
  31. Yemoja: Gender, Sexuality, and Creativity in the Latina by Solimar Otero, Toyin Falola 
  32. Neither Enemies nor Friends: Latinos, Blacks, Afro-Latinos by Anani Dzidzienyo
  33. Afrodescendants, Identity, and the Struggle for Development in the Americas by Bernd Reiter
  34. Mulattas and Mestizas: Representing Mixed Identities in the Americas, 1850-2000 by Suzanne Bost
What would you add? Let me know especially fiction and literature...



Monday, October 22, 2012

New Book: Acting White? Rethinking Race in Post-Racial America

I don't know about the Post-Racial part but this one is for all the kids (like me) who've ever been called "coconut," "oreo," "apple" or "banana."


Acting White? : Rethinking Race in Post-Racial America

In Acting White, Devon Carbado and Mitu Gulati argue that racial judgments are often based not just on skin color, but on how a person conforms to behavior stereotypically associated with a certain race. Specifically, people judge racial minorities on how they "perform" their race. That includes the clothes they wear, how they style their hair, the institutions with which they affiliate, their racial politics, the people they befriend, date or marry, where they live, how they speak, and their outward mannerisms and demeanor. 


Employing these cues, decision-makers decide not simply whether a person is black but the degree to which she or he is so. Relying on numerous examples from the workplace, higher education, and police interactions, the authors demonstrate that, for African Americans, the costs of "acting black" are high. This creates pressures for blacks to "act white." 


But, as the authors point out, "acting white" has costs as well. Written in an easy style that is non-doctrinaire and provocative, the book makes complex concepts both accessible and interesting. Whether you agree and disagree with Acting White, the book will challenge your assumptions and make you think about racial prejudice from a fresh vantage point.


Devon Carbado is Associate Dean at the UCLA School of Law and Professor of Law and African American Studies. Mitiu Gulati is Professor of Law at Duke University.

Thursday, August 06, 2009

Identity Entanglement

In her lecture, "Belonging to Britain", Hazel Carby looks at the historic relationship between England and Jamaica, including the history of the slave trade in Bristol and the complex question of identity for those of mixed British and West Indian heritage. Carby is a professor of African American Studies and American Studies at Yale University. Born in Britain of Jamaican and Welsh parentage, she has broadened the range of African American scholarship by situating it in the larger context of the international black diaspora.


 
Web Analytics