Showing posts with label Race and ethnicity in the United States Census. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Race and ethnicity in the United States Census. Show all posts

Friday, November 15, 2013

#FridayReads: For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet's Journey by Richard Blanco

For All of Us, One Today is a fluid, poetic account of Richard Blanco's life-changing experiences as the inaugural poet in 2013. In this brief and evocative narrative, he shares the story of the call from the White House committee and all the exhilaration and upheaval of the days that followed. 

For the first time, he reveals the inspiration and challenges—including his experiences as a Latino immigrant and gay man—behind the creation of the inaugural poem, "One Today," as well as two other poems commissioned for the occasion ("Mother Country" and "What We Know of Country"), published here for the first time ever, alongside translations of all three of those poems into his native Spanish. Finally, Blanco reflects on his new role as a public voice, his vision for poetry's place in our nation's consciousness, his spiritual embrace of Americans everywhere, and his renewed understanding of what it means to be an American as a result of the inauguration. 

 Like the inaugural poem itself, For All of Us, One Today speaks to what makes this country and its people great, marking a historic moment of hope and promise in our evolving American landscape. 


Richard Blanco
 (Photo: pennstatenews)
Selected by President Obama to be the fifth inaugural poet in history, Richard Blanco is the youngest, first Latino, first immigrant, and first openly gay person to serve in the role. The negotiation of cultural identity and universal themes of place and belonging characterize his three collections of poetry—City of a Hundred Fires, Directions to The Beach of the Dead, and Looking for The Gulf Motel. Blanco is a fellow of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and a Woodrow Wilson Visiting Fellow. He lives in Bethel, Maine.

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

A Literary Guide to National Hispanic Heritage Month

The kind folks at Open Road Media sent this great infographic over  guide you through the plethora of great reads, highlighting top picks in fiction, memoir, children’s, mystery, and more. spotlighting literature and stories that explore Hispanic themes. Don’t know where to begin?

"Gabriel García Márquez. Frida Kahlo. Christopher Columbus. Pablo Picasso. These are just a few of the countless men and women that have inspired and shaped American art, culture, and politics. Like their forbearers, Hispanic and Latino Americans continue to contribute to the rich fabric of the United States in innumerable ways, from the literature of Isabelle Allende to the music of Carlos Santana."


































See full size

Thursday, July 04, 2013

Become a part of the LATINO AMERICANS PBS project

LATINO AMERICANS is a landmark six-hour documentary featuring interviews with nearly 100 Latinos and more than 500 years of History, narrated by actor Benjamin Bratt, will air nationally on PBS on three consecutive Tuesdays, premiering on September 17, September 24 and October 1.

Become a part of the LATINO AMERICANS project. Make a video describing what being Latino means to you, share your family traditions, tell us how you celebrate your heritage and culture or let us know about your role models. Share your story and become part of #LatinosPBS.

Get the DVR ready!

 




Friday, June 14, 2013

Lit Links and Scoops

Your weekly link pack:

To be, or not to be a Latino Author

- Mexico’s illiteracy problem is growing worse

- I'm sort of obsessed with Joss & Main, a home goods limited sale site.

- A list of the 2013 International Latino Book Awards Winners! via @mamiversebooks

- Racism on Twitter - yet again.

- Watcha Magazine is seeking advertiser. Be part of the 1st Latino Hip hop Magazine in the Nation! Shoot them an email at info@watchamag.com.

- Moms Turn to Tech to Get Kids Access to Latino Authors via ABC News

- Podcast: 200 Years of Latino History in Philadelphia" by WHYY Public Media via soundcloud

- "The idea that larger, traditional publishing houses—like Simon & Schuster, Alfred K. Knopf and
MacMillan—are passing over Hispanic authors, despite the quality of work and incredible niche in the book market, is disappointing." via Voxxi

- Great essay: the truth about multicultural stories via the Rumpus

- Have you joined this amazing group of Latina Bloggers yet? Join on Facebook.

- Very excited about Guillermo Del Toro's book, The Strain, coming to TV. Via Screenrant I also want to catch up on the BBC miniseries, In the Flesh, that I missed. iTunes, here I come.

- A fascinating map of the world’s most and least racially tolerant countries via Washington Post

- Great read: "The Truth About Bicultural Consumers and How Marketers Are Taking Notice Cultural Identity Is Crucial and Should Be Represented in Media" via AdAge.

- FX Courts Latinos (hard) for Crime Thriller 'The Bridge' - Early screenings, Q&As in bilingual media and a multicity mural project help boost awareness among a potential Hispanic viewership of 48 million. via Hollywood Reporter.

The Future Silicon Valley: Latina Coders via SV Latino

- Simón Bolívar: The Latin American Hero Many Americans Don’t Know via Time

- Am I an ‘Immigrant Writer’? By AMIT MAJMUDAR

Well done, Bacardi!


Check out these two new projects that need your help:

2013 indigogo Video from Renzo Devia / Creador Pictures on Vimeo.




Monday, January 07, 2013

New Book: My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor

English: Sonia Sotomayor, U.S. Supreme Court j...
Sonia Sotomayor, U.S. Supreme Court justice (Photo: Wikipedia)
My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor is out this month, put this biography on the to-read list.

The first Hispanic and third woman appointed to the United States Supreme Court, Sonia Sotomayor has become an instant American icon. Now, with a candor and intimacy never undertaken by a sitting Justice, she recounts her life from a Bronx housing project to the federal bench, a journey that offers an inspiring testament to her own extraordinary determination and the power of believing in oneself.

Here is the story of a precarious childhood, with an alcoholic father (who would die when she was nine) and a devoted but overburdened mother, and of the refuge a little girl took from the turmoil at home with her passionately spirited paternal grandmother. But it was when she was diagnosed with juvenile diabetes that the precocious Sonia recognized she must ultimately depend on herself.  She would learn to give herself the insulin shots she needed to survive and soon imagined a path to a different life. 


With only television characters for her professional role models, and little understanding of what was involved, she determined to become a lawyer, a dream that would sustain her on an unlikely course, from valedictorian of her high school class to the highest honors at Princeton, Yale Law School, the New York County District Attorney’s office, private practice, and appointment to the Federal District Court before the age of forty. 

Along the way we see how she was shaped by her invaluable mentors, a failed marriage, and the modern version of extended family she has created from cherished friends and their children. Through her still-astonished eyes, America’s infinite possibilities are envisioned anew in this warm and honest book, destined to become a classic of self-invention and self-discovery.

Monday, October 22, 2012

New Book: Acting White? Rethinking Race in Post-Racial America

I don't know about the Post-Racial part but this one is for all the kids (like me) who've ever been called "coconut," "oreo," "apple" or "banana."


Acting White? : Rethinking Race in Post-Racial America

In Acting White, Devon Carbado and Mitu Gulati argue that racial judgments are often based not just on skin color, but on how a person conforms to behavior stereotypically associated with a certain race. Specifically, people judge racial minorities on how they "perform" their race. That includes the clothes they wear, how they style their hair, the institutions with which they affiliate, their racial politics, the people they befriend, date or marry, where they live, how they speak, and their outward mannerisms and demeanor. 


Employing these cues, decision-makers decide not simply whether a person is black but the degree to which she or he is so. Relying on numerous examples from the workplace, higher education, and police interactions, the authors demonstrate that, for African Americans, the costs of "acting black" are high. This creates pressures for blacks to "act white." 


But, as the authors point out, "acting white" has costs as well. Written in an easy style that is non-doctrinaire and provocative, the book makes complex concepts both accessible and interesting. Whether you agree and disagree with Acting White, the book will challenge your assumptions and make you think about racial prejudice from a fresh vantage point.


Devon Carbado is Associate Dean at the UCLA School of Law and Professor of Law and African American Studies. Mitiu Gulati is Professor of Law at Duke University.

Friday, September 14, 2012

Si Se Puede - Rock the Vote - Hispanic Heritage Draft

It's Hispanic Heritage Month and what better to celebrate your Latinidad than by flexing our political and civic muscles this election year. In partnership with Voto Latino, you can register to vote right here, right now. (Then get ready to hit the polling booths on Election Day, and don't forget to bring Mami, Abuela and the rest of the registered voters in your family along with you). Together we make a major impact on the future of America.

Through both Voto Latino and National Voter Registration Day’s online voter registration tool, users that complete the online form will receive an emailed PDF with their information filled in. The registrant then simply signs, stamps, and sends the completed form to the address included in their form. That’s it -- the whole process takes less than 5 minutes.
About Voto Latino

CHARLOTTE, NC - SEPTEMBER 05:  Taboo of the Bl...
 Taboo of the Black Eyed Peas at Voto Latino's Purple Carpet Bash on Sept 5, 2012. (Getty Images)
Founded in 2004 by actor Rosario Dawson and political analyst Maria Teresa Kumar, Voto Latino is a dynamic and growing organization whose civic engagement campaigns have reached 55 million Latino households.

Rosario Dawson
Rosario Dawson
Driven by the belief that Latino issues and American issues are one and the same, Voto Latino has effectively used volunteers, celebrities, media, and the latest technology to register 120,000 young Latino voters, galvanize Latino youth and their families to be counted in the 2010 Census, and mobilize them to speak out and take action on policies impacting their lives.

* Our regularly scheduled edition of Lit Link & Scoops, will return next week following the PSA.

Monday, August 06, 2012

NYC: Come See Me at The Comadres y Compadres Writers Conference

I will be speaking at the upcoming Comadres y Compadres Writers Conference on October 6, 2012, in New York City, drawing from my experience as social media strategist and former book publicist. I hope you all can make it and would appreciate it if you help spread the word as well.

Time: 8:00 am to 6 pm
Date: Saturday, October 6, 2012
Place: Medgar Evers College
The City University of New York
1650 Bedford Ave. Brooklyn, New York 11225

The Comadres y Compadres Writers Conference, which will take place at the Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York on October 6, 2012, will provide Latino writers with access to published Latino authors as well as agents and editors who have a proven track record of publishing Latino writers.

In addition, the CCWC will offer an insider’s perspective on how best to navigate the particular challenges and opportunities faced by Latino writers in the current publishing landscape, as well as foster a vibrant national community of writers akin to what Las Comadres has already created with its Las Comadres international network and its Las Comadres and Friends National Latino Book Club and Teleconference Series.

Keynote Speaker: Sonia Manzano, Actress and Author.

Having originated the role of “Maria” on Sesame Street, Manzano wrote two children’s books, No Dogs Allowed (Simon and Schuster, 2004) and A Box Full of Kittens (Simon and Schuster, 2007), and will have her first YA novel, The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano, published by Scholastic in Fall 2012.

Participants currently include Johanna Castillo, Vice President & Senior Editor/Atria, Simon & Schuster: Jaime de Pablos, Director/Vintage Español, Knopf Doubleday Group; Adriana Dominguez, Agent/Full Circle Literary; Mercedes Fernandez, Assistant Editor/Dafina Books, Kensington Publishing; Sulay Hernandez, Editor/Other Press; Cheryl Klein, Executive Editor/Arthur A. Levine Books; Selina L. McLemore, Senior Editor/Grand Central Publishing; Christina Morgan, Editor/Harcourt Houghton Mifflin; Lukas Ortiz, Managing Director/Philip G. Spitzer Literary Agency, Inc.;  Diane Stockwell, Founder/Globo Libros Literary Management; and Stacy Whitman, Founder and Editorial Director/Tu Books. (AND ME!)

To register to attend, sponsor or attend as vendor or volunteer, click here for more information.

Save the Date & See who else will be there:

RSVP via LinkedIn
RSVP via Facebook
RSVP via Plancast
Las Comadres Conference Program


Sunday, August 05, 2012

New Book: Latinos, Inc.The Marketing and Making of a People

English: Seal of the United States Census Bure...
English: Seal of the United States Census Bureau. The blazon is defined here as: On a shield an open book beneath which is a lamp of knowledge emitting rays above in base two crossed quills. Around the whole a wreath of single leaves, surrounded by an outer band bearing between two stars the words "U.S. Department of Commerce" in the upper portion and "Bureau of the Census" in the lower portion, the lettering concentric with an inner beaded rim and an outer dentilated rim. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
When did Latinos become an ethnic group or we just a segment of a target audience? If you've ever asked yourself this question, this new book by Arlene Dávila, an Assistant Professor of American Studies and Anthropology at New York University, explores theories of identity and ethnicity in the U.S.

Latinos, Inc.: The Marketing and Making of a People


Both Hollywood and corporate America are taking note of the marketing power of the growing Latino population in the United States. And as salsa takes over both the dance floor and the condiment shelf, the influence of Latin culture is gaining momentum in American society as a whole. 


Yet the increasing visibility of Latinos in mainstream culture has not been accompanied by a similar level of economic parity or political enfranchisement. In this important, original, and entertaining book, Arlene Dávila provides a critical examination of the Hispanic marketing industry and of its role in the making and marketing of U.S. Latinos.


Dávila finds that Latinos' increased popularity in the marketplace is simultaneously accompanied by their growing exotification and invisibility. She scrutinizes the complex interests that are involved in the public representation of Latinos as a generic and culturally distinct people and questions the homogeneity of the different Latino subnationalities that supposedly comprise the same people and group of consumers. 


In a fascinating discussion of how populations have become reconfigured as market segments, she shows that the market and marketing discourse become important terrains where Latinos debate their social identities and public standing.

Monday, May 14, 2007

Just Say "No" to MSG!

Lately, I've been on sort of "green" kick and it has spread to what I eat. While I've never been one to munch on unhealthy things ; chips or drink tons of soda, I've been considering how I can make my diet healthier overall. The other day one of my friends told me I should cut out salt of my diet, and I easily responded I didn't salt my food.

Then she asked if I used Sazon or Adobo in my food, to which I replied "of course, I do," I mean what good Puerto Rican cook doesn't, right? That's when her tsk-tsking began - I went home and checked the labels and found that my adobo was obscenely high in sodium and that my sazon was not only high in salt but also contained a lot of MSG.

I did make an attempt to not use those products and my dinner turned out badly, the food was bland and missing it usual sabrosura.

I, then bought the new reduced sodium Adobo, and the "natural" Sazon to my dismay however, both products are very high in MSG. Now while some argue that MSG is not harmful, i.e., Wikipedia, it does note here as well that MSG has an addictive type of quality (read: crack) that has induced obesity in lab rats.

I also found this which doesn't seem like a very credible read but if you want to be petrified, then feel free to check it out: http://www.msgtruth.org/

Not cool, man!

Description unavailable
 (Photo: minusbaby)
So what's a girl to do, when diabetes, lupus, high blood pressure and even autism have reared their ugly head in her gene pool? Well, I decided that unless Goya and all the other ethnic seasoning companies do something serious about lowering the levels of sodium and other "ingredients/chemicals" in our food, I'm going to go the DIY route.

And, I welcome you to join me! So in that light, I'm adding some DIY seasoning recipes with no preservatives (and better for your wallet too).

Homemade Sazon

Latino garlic-pepper-vinegar marinade

Puerto Rican adobo powder

Puerto Rican green sofrito

I'm sure that if you google these condiments you will find an array of ethnically customized versions of all the above.

So get in the kitchen, have fun and stay healthy!
 
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