Showing posts with label Puerto Rico. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Puerto Rico. Show all posts

Friday, April 10, 2015

#FridayReads: Mi Comida Latina: Vibrant, Fresh, Simple, Authentic by Marcella Kriebel

Mi Comida Latina: Vibrant, Fresh, Simple, Authentic by Marcella Kriebel

A stunning, hand-lettered and fully cookbook featuring more than 100 authentic recipes collected from home kitchens across Latin America.

Discovered as a successful self-published Kickstarter project, Mi Comida Latina captures the warmth and depth of culinary traditions in Mexico, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia and Puerto Rico. Artist/author Marcella Kriebel’s vivid, charming watercolors accompany more than 100 recipes including arepas, tamales, ceviches, fish tacos, salsas, flan, spicy micheladas and icy watermelon paletas, plus traditional kitchen tools, techniques and practical tips for choosing and preparing mango, cactus, yucca, coconut and other produce. Every page is a joyous work of art.

Marcella Kriebel is an artist, food enthusiast, and cookbook author. She lives in Washington, D.C.

Friday, July 04, 2014

#FridayReads: The Feast of San Sebastian By Jonathan Marcantoni

Have you read The Feast of San Sebastian By Jonathan Marcantoni? It's a "raw, gritty and frightening socio-political thriller set in the island paradise of Puerto Rico," according to reviews that debuted last year:

Two Haitians are smuggled into Puerto Rico with promises of work and a better future, but are instead forced into slave labor at an American factory. Ilan is a middleman on the black market whose guilty conscience has led to alcoholism and gambling debts to the biggest crime boss in Puerto Rico. These three men's lives will collide when Ilan is forced to pay his debt by arranging for the assassination of the corrupt Superintendent of Police. 

What follows is an examination of the decadence and injustice of a colonial society on the brink of self-destruction.

Jonathan Marcantoni is the author of Traveler’s Rest and Communion (with Jean Blasiar), both published by Savant Books and Publications. He has been a freelance writer and editor since 2004. His family is from Utuado and Fajardo, Puerto Rico. He currently lives in San Antonio, TX with his wife and three daughters.

Author Jonathan Marcantoni
His intention with this book is to educate, and hopefully, to create action in its readers. The problems facing Puerto Rico can be remedied, but only if we work together as a people to make a better future for our families and for our country.

This book was inspired by the study “Trafficking of Persons in Puerto Rico: An Invisible Challenge” by César A. Rey Hernández, Ph.D. and Luisa Hernández Angueira, Ph.D. The crimes and criminal syndicates depicted in the book are based on cases described in that study and in articles published in the newspaper El Nuevo Día and reported by Wapa TV. 

The raids on slum communities, including La Perla, occurred between 2009 and 2011, with the raid on La Perla leading to the resignation of then-Superintendent of Police José Figueroa Sancha, who is the basis for the Superintendent in the book.
The yola operation that brings the Haitians over still exists and has grown rather than decreased over the last several years. It should be understood that the immigrants who come to Puerto Rico do so largely to go to the United States, making Puerto Rico a transit state for illegal immigrants, and in turn, for smugglers. 

Puerto Rico’s human trafficking problem is in direct relation with its relationship to the United States, and not because life there is any better than the immigrant’s homeland. While Dominicans make up the majority of immigrants who use the Canal de Mona to travel to Puerto Rico, there are also large numbers of Haitians, Chinese and Cuban immigrants who use the route as well.

Thursday, July 03, 2014

1899 - Belle of Calle Cristo & Calle San Sebastián in San Juan

This fascinating and stylish photo is from the Teodoro Vidal Collection, Archives Center, National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution, the original image appeared in the 1899, 2-volume history, Our Islands and Their People as Seen with Camera and Pencil.

The caption beneath the photograph reads, "A Colored Belle of Puerto Rico: The mixture of African with Spanish blood is not found in all of the people of this island. The higher classes of white people hold themselves as strictly in their own society as in any other country. This attractive colored girl is of the higher type of that race." via The NMAH Blog

Friday, March 21, 2014

#FridayReads: The Essential Hits of Shorty Bon Bon by Willie Perdomo

English: Willie Perdomo, poet and publisher.
Willie Perdomo. (Photo: Wikipedia)
Papo's back - put this on your list - just take my word for it!

The Essential Hits of Shorty Bon Bon by Willie Perdomo

Through dream song and elegy, alternate takes and tempos, prizewinning poet Willie Perdomo’s third collection crackles with vitality and dynamism as it imagines the life of a percussionist, rebuilding the landscape of his apprenticeship, love, diaspora, and death. 

At the beginning of his infernal journey, Shorty Bon Bon recalls his live studio recording with a classic 1970s descarga band, sharing his recollection with an unidentified poet. This opening section is followed by a call-and-response with his greatest love, a singer named Rose, and a visit to Puerto Rico that inhabits a surreal nationalistic dreamscape, before a final jam session where Shorty recognizes his end and a trio of voices seek to converge on his elegy.

Willie Perdomo is the author of Where a Nickel Costs a Dime, a finalist for the Poetry Society of America Norma Farber First Book Award, and Smoking Lovely, a winner of the PEN Beyond Margins Award. His poems have appeared in the New York Times Magazine, Bomb, and other publications. He is an Instructor of English at Phillips Exeter Academy.

Wednesday, November 20, 2013

#NonfictionNovember – 8 Recommended (Fiction & Nonfiction) Book Pairings

I found this challenge over at Regularrumination to find pairings for nonfiction with its complimentary fiction reads pretty interesting. Here are my recommendations:

Pairing 1:
In the Time of the Butterflies
 (Photo: Wikipedia)
In the Time of the Butterflies by Julia Alvarez
The Last Playboy: The High Life of Porfirio Rubirosa by Shawn Levy

Pairing 2:
When I Was Puerto Rican: A Memoir by Esmeralda Santiago
If I Bring You Roses by Marisel Vera

Pairing 3:
Like Water for Chocolate: A Novel in Monthly Installments with Recipes, Romances, and Home Remedies by Laura Esquivel
The Daughters of Juarez: A True Story of Serial Murder South of the Border by Teresa Rodriguez, Diana Montané and Lisa Pulitzer

Pairing 4:
Krik? Krak! by Edwidge Danticat
Haiti: The Tumultuous History - From Pearl of the Caribbean to Broken Nation by Philippe Girard

Pairing 5:
We The Animals by Justin Torres
For All of Us, One Today: An Inaugural Poet's Journey by Richard Blanco

Cover of "Cherries in Winter: My Family's...
Cover via Amazon
Pairing 6:
Cherries in Winter: My Family's Recipe for Hope in Hard Times by Suzan Colon
The Time It Snowed in Puerto Rico: A Novel by Sarah McCoy

Pairing 7: 
The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz
Down These Mean Streets by Piri Thomas

Pairing 8:
The Scent of Lemon Leaves by Clara Sanchez and Julie Wark
The Real Odessa: Smuggling the Nazis to Peron's Argentina by Uki Goni

Pairing 9:
The Woman in Battle: The Civil War Narrative of Loreta Janeta Velazquez, Cuban Woman and Confederate Soldier by Loreta Janeta Velazquez
Ines of My Soul: A Novel by Isabel Allende

Wednesday, October 16, 2013

Mami's Beef Stew (A Tale of Puerto Rican Carne Guisada & Yearning)

I've been working on restoring my blogroll, an index of all my favorite sites and blogs, happily rejoicing at the tenacity of some which I've been following for years and others whom I had thought had stopped.

Lately, I am uncertain if it's the autumnal change or what, but I've been feeling melancholic and craving time with my mother and siblings. Longing for simpler times when life was less hectic and perhaps, I am romancing the stone a bit but I've been missing times when I worried less and enjoyed more freely.

Sometimes I yearn for dishes that I can only taste in my memories, made by my Mother's hand and therefore, unreplicable. Dishes like Gazpacho de Bacalao with a loaf of fresh Italian baked bread, or Patitas de Cerdo con Garbanzos, or Gandinga, that cannot be ordered from a restaurant or entrusted to just anyone.

The other day, searching for a Carne Guisada (Puerto Rican Beef Stew) recipe that seemed similar to my Mom's, I came across an old blog favorite, Platanos, Mangoes and Me. Norma dedicates the post to her mom and you can clearly feel the love and loss in this post. It's interesting how a food or an olfactory sensation can trigger such powerful memories and feelings.

I started making the recipe and from the instant I started seasoning the cubed meat to let it marinate, I was taken back to my mom's kitchen, sights and sounds.

Instantly, I was sitting on the counter in our old tenement, East Harlem apartment kitchen, legs so short, they dangled off the counter, watching my mom, carefully adding, tasting and stirring - Every once in a while, giving me a taste or having me help with a small task. That's how I learned to cook, watching my mom, make ordinary things into spectacular dishes that often spellbound even our neighbors. My mom's cooking was and still is legendary.

I called her up to ask if it was okay to substitute sweet potato instead of potatoes or yautia and had a good chuckle when she told me, "no way." I happily trekked off to the supermarket wound the corner and came back to work on my stew. Once I browned the meat, I threw the rest of the ingredients in and just left the frozen peas and carrots out till the end. I simmered it for 3 hours all the time, captivated by the smell wafting through the house. It was like I had conjured, literally conjured my mom's spirit and brought her to me.

When my boyfriend came home, he was elated the minute he walked through the door and exclaimed how good it smelled. I felt my heart swell because I, too, remember vividly, coming in from the cold walk back from school and being engulfed by the lovely, decadent smell of my Mami's cooking.

The stew which I served with steamed multi-grain rice was delicious, according to my boyfriend and official taste tester, who went back for seconds. I thought so too.

Here's the recipe I used and a photo below.

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

Farm Lit & First World Problems

I remember reading And I Shall Have Some Peace There: Trading in the Fast Lane for My Own Dirt Road
By Margaret Roach, a couple of years back when I still worked as an online book publicist at Hachette Book Group.

I was enamored instantly at the courage of the author, who left a 15-year career at Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, where she reigned as Editorial Director, and moved into her weekend Upstate house to be closer to nature and lead an authentic life.

There is a certain glamour that comes with the fast-pace of New York City albeit the grittiness and rat race feel of it all. The deeper one is entrenched in the every-day monotony, the more you yearn for simplicity, frankness, and an uncharted course.

Of course, this may just be symptomatic of "the grass is always greener" or wanting what you don't have - which is simply human nature. Of course, the girl with curly hair envies the stick-straight locks of a friend or the successful high-wheeling executive wants to ditch it all and go surfing, it all makes perfect sense.

I've had so many conversations with so many friends who just don't want to work any more that I wonder if we've all been hoodwinked into this narrow path of college and making lots of money and moving up the corporate ladder qualifying as success. Perhaps that unfulfilled feeling points directly to something we are missing - that which cannot be satiated with a pair of designer shoes or organic, fair trade coffee beans.

Everywhere you turn, in all forms of art from movies, to books, to graffiti, every one is searching for a respite, an

The Atlantic published a  piece on the trendiness of  "Farm Lit" several weeks ago: "chick lit is dead (or dying, at least). But in its place, we now have a new genre. Call it "farm lit." In farm lit books, our heroines ditch the big cities beloved in chick lit—New York, Chicago, LA—in favor of slower, more rural existences, scrappily learning to raise goats on idyllic Vermont farms or healing their broken hearts by opening cupcake bakeries in their sweet Southern hometowns. Instead of sipping $16 appletinis with the girls, they're mucking out barns and learning to knit. Instead of pining after Mr. Big, they're falling for the hunky farmer next door."

The irony here is from the "first world problems" lens. These are the frustrations and complaints that are only experienced by privileged individuals in wealthy countries.

I think back to another favorite, If I Bring You Roses By Marisel Vera, that speaks to another era, a simpler one in rural Puerto Rico and I think about my grandmother or migrant farm and day laborers - about working with your hands and the soil, what would they make of this "trend."

O my brothers, 
I beat my palms, 
still soft, 
against the stubble of my harvesting. 
(You beat your soft palms, too.) 
My pain is sweet. 
Sweeter than the oats or wheat or corn. 
It will not bring me knowledge of my hunger.
-- Jean Toomer, Harvest Song

Thursday, April 25, 2013

Mother Atabey & the Web of Life: The Green Latina

We travel in so many circles. 
Renewed, reborn, reconnected, 
over and over again.

Earlier this year in an attempt to eat healthier and greener, I joined Urban Organics, a service that delivers a box of fresh, organic produce from local farms every week to your home, after reading about it on Treehugger. In honor of Earth Day, I wanted to share a little bit of the experience here.

My first box endowed me with beautiful greens and fruits so pretty I was forced to Instagram.

I was mystified by all the lovely greens but luckily some were labeled and I quickly learned to distinguish Chard from Kale and so on. Using Pinterest and the web, I learned the best way to get grit and sand off the greens is by soaking them in a bowl, letting the soil and fine sand float to the top and then changing the water until it is all clear. Unfortunately, I learned this the hard way and can tell you that nothing sucks as much as chewing on gritty leaves.

Inspired by fellow bloggers like Chris Brogan, I bought a juicer and now about once a week, I make fresh carrot juice and a separate batch of orange or fruit juice. It's great to consume but it's quite a lot of work to rinse, chop, and then clean up the mess.

Part of the fun too was the "mystery box" angle to the delivery each week, sometimes I was at a complete loss with what to do, with say an eggplant, for example, which I don't like and have never cooked. I ended up using a recipe I found online for Baba Ganoush and found it to be quite yummy. Part of the difficulty too was in the abundance of produce for only two people and not having the time to prep it and/or eat it.

I tried pickling beets, and freezing broccoli, green beans, and a random eggplant but soon my freezer was full. Twice, my produce drawer hit its limit and was overflowing with spuds and I then took a stab at making potato kugel for Passover and Shepherd's Pie, Verdict: Delicious, very high in carbs and doesn't keep very well. I even prepared filling nutritious breakfast treats in advance.

Every once in a while I was forced to chuck greens that wilted or completely yellowed and fruit that just went bad, all the while feeling guilty and wasteful. Even throwing out the pulp from my juicer, I wished I could donate it to someone's compost pile if not longing for my own where chubby little worms could get their fill and give me rich soil for pretty flowers. Yet this is a start. I will lead a better more enriched life. I will eat less processed food. I will eat more food that was tenderly grown and made with love and compassion. I will not burden my descendants with the ills of obesity, diabetes or malnutrition. I will treat my body as the temple it has always been. Barriga llena, corazon contento.

All in all, it's been a low cost, fun experience toward a healthier future. I think I will continue the service through the summer just to feast on summer's sweet harvest.

* Atabey (Taino, Puerto Rico) - Primary Supreme being representing the four cardinal points. Unique Turtle women of fertility, beauty, rituals, music, and ceremonies; mother of twins Yúcahu (God of Yuca/ the sea and the mountains) and Juracán ( God of Hurricanes). She who gave birth to herself from all the elements , celestial Earth Mother Goddess of five names.

Taino Prayer to the Mother Goddess by tainoray

Bibi Atabey - Mother Atabey
Atte itabo era - Mother of Waters
Coaiba Mamona - Heavenly Mother of the Moon
Aturo aya wakia Itiba Cahubaba - Sister of our Ancient Bleeding Mother
Acona wakia Arawaka - Hear our Sacred People
Yemao waka waili - Protect our Children
Wakia Yari - Our Precious Jewels
Busica Waka Ketauri - Give us Life
Inaru-Matum - Generous Woman
Busica wakia Ahia Hu De - Give us your Blessing
Tai Ku Buya Han Han - Good Spirit Yes
Nabori Daca - I am your servant
Han Han Katu - So Be It

Sunday, February 03, 2013

Sonia Sotomayor's memoir "My Beloved World" hits #1

"Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor's memoir "My Beloved World" hit number one on the New York Times bestsellers list for hardcover nonfiction."

I am so pleased about this memoir's reach but there's a little irony here, 4-5 years ago I suggested to an undisclosed editor that they reach out to Sonia and offer her a book deal for her remarkable story. I was gently dismissed - "it wouldn't sell, she was "too young"... It's amazing to me now, how well her book is doing and demonstrates to me that I should always trust my instincts in spite of of naysayers because I am usually spot on. Bravo, Sonia!


Friday, November 16, 2012

Lit Links & Scoops

A list of cool things I read, observed, and collected all week for you:

- How Yunior's Narrative In 'The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao' Acts As An Archival History via HuffPo

- Social Media in 2013

 I wrote these three posts recently elsewhere:

I’m Not A “Girl Gamer:” How the Launch Call of Duty: Black Ops 2 Won Me Over 

How to Breakthrough Creative Road Blocks? The Oblique Strategies App

What Happens to a Cashless Society During an Event Like Hurricane Sandy?

- How to make Molten Dulce de Leche Cakes via BonAppetit

- Speaking of Dulce: Don't miss your chance to 'Send an Abrazo with Nestle' via Facebook on behalf of Nestlé ® Abuelita ™  and receive a Nestle Abuelita Kit w/ Coffee Mug & Samples *1st 500 for Next 9 Weeks - Starts Mondays at 1pm EST. Enter here.

- Check out Esta Vida Boricua [This Puerto Rican Life]. Esta Vida Boricua is a digital life-narrative installation, spoken history archive, and public performance space, which focuses on the ancestral stories of Puerto Rico and its diaspora.

- Help promote Las Comadres' first book, Count on Me, essays on fierce friendship by Latin@ authors. If you'd like to participate in upcoming book tour send an email to, by this Sunday Nov 18th!

El Gran Combo de Puerto Rico released a new 42-track compilation, the Greatest Christmas Hits of The Last Half Century – Patria, Tradicion & Navidad. Go to iTunes.

- How Doritos were invented via Getthefive

Thursday, November 15, 2012

NYC: Comite Noviembre's First Annual Book Expo & Artisan Fair this Weekend

You are cordially invited to participate in Comite Noviembre's First Annual Book Expo to take place at Comite Noviembre's Artisan Fair. The artisan fair is the largest Puerto Rican artisan fair in the US!!! FREE to the public!  Taking place Saturday, November 17, 2012, at Hostos Community College!

The Artisan Fair & Exhibit was established in 2006, in celebration of Comité Noviembre's, 20th anniversary. Over 50 artesanos puertorriqueños from throughout the US and Puerto Rico participated and the event boasted an attendance of over 5000 people in this very first Fair. 

The Book Expo will add more culture to an already established tradition in the NY Boricua community. The Expo take place at the bridge that spans the Grand Concourse on the 2nd floor, adjacent to the gym where the majority of the artisans will be set up. RSVP here.

Friday, August 31, 2012

Lit Links & Scoops

I'm moving out of town this weekend so this will be a short one. Have a great holiday weekend, everyone!

- Good News: Some of my photography will used in a documentary currently in production: Mayan Predictions, Myth or Reality by Tom Martens. To learn more about the project visit Mayan

- What Kind of Book Reader Are You? Diagnose yourself here

- Don’t think social will go away via Forbes

- Don't do it: The Best Book Reviews Money Can Buy via NY Times

- I discovered The Vanishers By Heidi Julavits on the website and devoured it this weekend. It was a fascinating mix of time travel, supernatural and feminist discourse that kept me enraptured in spite of all the packing I needed to do - not that I was procrastinating or anything.

- Cool infographic: The DNA of a successful book via mashable

- 5 Ideas That Will Change the World by 2025 - things to think about 

- Oldie but goodie: 47 Mind-Blowing Psychological Facts You Should Know About Yourself here

- Take a trip back in time to old Puerto Rico: Visit the ARCHIVO HISTORICO Y FOTOGRAFICO DE PUERTO RICO's photostream

- Places where it's okay to be an atheist: run away, run away
- Get ready for autumn: Asopao de Camarones recipe 

and remember:

“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, 'Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous?' Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. [universe] Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It's not just in some of us; it's in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.” 
― Marianne Williamson, Return to Love: Reflections on the Principles of "A Course in Miracles"

Thursday, August 23, 2012

Forbes' 100 Most Powerful Women List: The Latinas

Yesterday Forbes announced its 9th annual ranking of the World’s 100 Most Powerful Women. You can see the whole list here,

Members of the 2012 ranking represent women in technology (a new category this year), politics, business, media, entertainment,  non-profits, as well as billionaires – all ranked by money, media presence and impact.   

The women represent 28 countries, have an average age of 55, and a combined 90 million Twitter followers.   

“This year’s Power Women exert influence in very different ways, and to very different ends, and all with very different impacts on the global community,” said Moira Forbes, President & Publisher, ForbesWoman. “

Whether leading multi-billion-dollar companies, governing countries, shaping the cultural fabric of our lives, or spearheading humanitarian initiatives, collectively these women are changing the planet in profoundly powerful and dynamic ways.

Below are the Latinas on the list:

  • Dilma Rosseff (No. 3) – President, Brazil
  • Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner (No. 16) – President, Argentina
  • Maria das Gracas Silva Foster (No. 20) – CEO, Petrobras, Brazil
  • Jennifer Lopez (No. 38), Entertainer, Entrepreneur, U.S./Puerto Rico   
  • Shakira Mebarak (No. 40) – Entertainer, Philanthropist, Columbia
  • Rosalia Mera (No. 54) – Billionaire Philanthropist, Spain
  • Sofia Vergara (No. 75) – Actress, Entrenpreneur Colombia 
  • Giselle Bündchen (No. 83) – Supermodel, Ambassador, UN Environmental Program, Brazil

Monday, April 30, 2012

Cannes Selects Puerto Rican Film For Shorts Competition

Mi Santa Mirada by Alvaro Aponte-Centeno made the shorts lineup cut for this year's upcoming Cannes Film Festival earlier this month.

The short film tells the story of "Samy, a quiet and solitary man who lives from the drug business. The most important things in his life are his younger brother, who he is responsible for, and his horse. Tired of being a drug trafficking subordinate, he decides to betray his boss Papo. This short film reveals daily life at the marginalized spaces in Puerto Rico."

Congrats to Aponte-Centeno and team! Verdict: Boo, hiss at the tired focus on drug dealing but Yay on giving a voice and a platform to Puerto Rico's marginalized issues.

To learn more about the current issues plaguing La Isla del Encanto, check out Fear and Loathing in the Island that Doesn't Exist.

Thursday, April 19, 2012

DIY Guava Pastries: Pastelitos de Guayaba

I have fond memories of my grandfather's love of Guayaba (Guava paste) and sometimes whenever I treat myself to sweets from the Puerto Rican bakery on East 116th Street, one of my favorite things to get is a Pastelito de Guayaba.

Recently, I remembered this treat from the past and came across this nifty do-it-yourself cheat version of the recipe. Please note it's high in sugar content and not a healthy treat by any means but sweet pastries rarely are...

That being said, I would go ahead and use more guava paste than used in the video because in the real thing the guava layer literally flows out of the pastry when done. It looks like they went a little sparse there.

Ingredients needed: 
Pepperidge Farm® Puff Pastry Sheets
Guava Paste(Pasta de Guayaba)
Confectioners Sugar


Monday, January 16, 2012

East Harlem's Own: Hector "Macho" Camacho TV Debut

Son of East Harlem, Puerto Rican retired professional boxer, Héctor "Macho" Camacho is getting his own show business news segment on the popular Univision show "El Gordo y La Flaca, a TMZ-like entertainment program"

The 10-time world boxing champion who beat Sugar Ray Leonard and Roberto Duran will deliver his version of "Macho News." It won't be the first time, he's been on the network either, he participated in the Spanish version of dancing with the stars, ¡Mira Quien Baila!

 To read more about Latinos in boxing, check out ESPN's 12 Latino Fighters to Watch in 2012.

Wednesday, June 08, 2011

A controversial gas pipeline threatens the entire island of Puerto Rico

Gasoducto/PR Gas Pipeline:
Verde or Muerte?/Green or Deadly?
 A Dialogue With Dr. Arturo Massol
Friday, June 10 | 6:00pm - 9:00pm
 Union Theological Seminary
 3041 Broadway @ 121st Street NY NY
A controversial gas pipeline (named Via Verde by the government and Via de la Muerte by everyone else) threatens the entire island of Puerto Rico. 

While opposition to the project is nearly unanimous, the administration of Gov. Luis Fortuno is determined to construct it no matter how many lives and communities are effected or how much permanent damage is done to the natural environment. Already, on May 1st, tens of thousands marched under a torrential downpour to SAY NO TO THE GASODUCTO! Many more have also signed petitions against the project and Congressman Luis Gutierrez has eloquently ripped the proposal in Congress.

During this special forum, we will be joined by Dr. Arturo Massol of Casa Pueblo,the dynamic community organization based in Adjuntas, PR that is leading the effort to get this unnecessary, costly and dangerous project terminated.

This year, the National Puerto Rican Parade is dedicated to the environment and Casa Pueblo has been invited to participate as an honored guest.

We urge you to attend this important information session to hear the latest about this proposed gas pipeline and how it threatens the people of Puerto Rico.

Co-sponsored by (list in formation): Union Theological Seminary, National Congress for Puerto Rican Rights, Labor Council for Latin American Advancement, Cemi Underground, East Harlem Preservation, Virtual Boricua, PIP New York

Consider the following:

** The pipeline route is 146 km long with a potential impact to over 100 meters wide and, would severely impact around 400 agricultural acres.

** It will severely affect the conservation of the of the Rio Grande de Arecibo and Rio Portuguese Watersheds and impact on many rivers including, Rio de la Plata, Río Bayamón, Quebrada Diego, Rio Cibuco, Cano Matos, Perdomo Canal, Rio Grande de Arecibo, Caguana River, River Caguanita, Pellejas River, Rio Corcho, Quebrada Arenas, Río Tallaboa, Tanamá River, Indian River, Rio Grande de Manati and Rio Yunes.

** The pipeline route is comprised of 106 km of the Karst Conservation Zone which supplies more than 25% of the total water demand of the country and directly impacts 223 acres of Special Conservation Zones.

** The presence of sinkholes and unstable terrain located within the pipeline route has some of the highest slopes ranging from sea level on the coast to 3,000 feet above sea level in Adjuntas will be more susceptible to landslides. The “Via Verde” pipeline route crosses two seismic fault lines and then continues towards San Juan, affecting 13 municipalities and 51 communities.

** Although the government says "there is a prudent separation of the pipeline from the communities"; the pipeline will pass along the side of the road that runs in front of the Levittown community in Toa Baja which is home to about 30,071 people; pass through the lands of the University of Puerto Rico in the Town of Utuado, with potential risks to over 22,854 families and students and will be exposed along sections of the Arecibo Utuado PR10 where over 13,104 vehicles transit every day.

RSVP here

"They are violating all the rules....We need hearings, public participation," says Rep. Luis Guitierrez (D-IL). "Once you destroy the natural habitat of Puerto Rico, it is not something you can recuperate."
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