Showing posts with label Puerto Rican. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Puerto Rican. Show all posts

Friday, May 09, 2014

The Latino Lit Syllabus - Required Reading

I minored in English Literature and some of my favorite books have been a result of required reading especially from my Multicultural Literature courses. I don't think I would have discovered Maxine Hong, Jean Toomer, or Lois-Ann Yamanaka otherwise.

Taking a cue from the recent airing of Junot Diaz' MIT Course Syllabus, I've decided to share some other notable required reading lists that you might find interesting:

Introduction to U.S. Latino/a Literature - Florida Atlantic University
José Martí. “Coney Island.” (1881)
María Amparo Ruíz de Burton. From The Squatter and the Don. (1885)
Jesús Colón. Excerpts from A Puerto Rican in New York and Other Sketches. (1961)
Piri Thomas. Down These Mean Streets. (1967)
Oscar Zeta Acosta. Revolt of the Cockroach People. (1973)
Selections of Nuyorican Poets. (1960s-1970s)
Sandra Cisneros. The House on Mango Street. (1984)
Gloria Anzaldúa. Borderlands/La Frontera. (1987)
Cristina Garcia. Dreaming in Cuban (1992)
Ana Menéndez. Loving Che. (2003)
Junot Diaz. Drown. (1996)
Yxta Maya Murray. Locas. (1998)
Tanya Maria Barrientos. Family Resemblance. (2003)
Ernesto Quiñonez. Bodega Dreams. (2000)
Ilan Stavans. The Hispanic Condition. (1996)
Juan Flores. From Bomba to Hip-Hop. (2000)
Lisa Sánchez González. Boricua Literature. (2001)
Gustavo Pérez Firmat. Life on the Hyphen. (1994)
Román de la Campa. Cuba on my Mind. (2000)
Raphael Dalleo and Elena Machado Sáez. The Latino/a Canon and the Emergence of Post-Sixties Literature. (2007)

University of California, Santa Cruz:
Manuel Muñoz, The Faith Healer of Olive Avenue
Helena Maria Viramontes, Under the Feet of Jesus
H.G. Carrillo, Loosing My Espanish
Jaime Hernández, The Education of Hopey Glass
Héctor Tobar, The Tattooed Soldier

University of Nebraska Omaha:
The Squatter and the Don (1885) by Maria Amparo Ruiz de Burton
George Washington Gomez (Paredes wrote this novel in the 1940s and 1950s but it wasn’t published until 1990)by Américo Paredes
And the Earth Did Not Devour Him (1987) by Tomás Rivera
Borderlands/La Frontera (1987) by Gloria Anzaldúa
The Rain God (1991) by Arturo Islas
So Far From God (1993) by Ana Castillo
Days of Awe (2001) by Achy Obejas
Acuña, Rudolfo: Occupied America: A History of Chicanos
Aranda Jr., Jose: When We Arrive: A New Literary History of Mexican America Extinct Lands,
Brady, Mary Pat: Temporal Geographies: Chicana Literature and the Urgency of Space
Paredes, Américo: Folklore and Culture on the Texas Mexican Border
Paz, Octavio: The Labyrinth of Solitude
Saldívar, Ramón: Chicano Narrative: The Dialectics of Difference
Torres, Eden: Chicana Without Apology

Introduction to Latino/a Studies:
Michelle Habell-Pallan and Mary Romero Latino/a Popular Culture (ed.)
Julia Alvarez, In the Name of Salomé
Rudolfo Anaya, Bless Me, Ultima
Gloria Anzaldúa, Borderlands/La Frontera
Black Artemis, Picture Me Rollin’
Angie Cruz, Soledad
Junot Díaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao
Cristina Garcia, Dreaming in Cuban
Ana Menéndez, Loving Che
Ernesto Quiñonez, Bodega Dreams
Piri Thomas, Down These Mean Streets
Esmeralda Santiago, When I was Puerto Rican
Helena Maria Viramontes, Their Dogs Came With Them

There are many of these online and I only posted some of the ones that didn't contain too many of the usual notables. Next time you are looking for some great titles to read and discover this might be a new avenue for direction.


Wednesday, March 07, 2007

Blowing A Gasket


You know maybe it's the Sicilian blood in me, perhaps the Puerto Rican or maybe I was endowed with a fierce (read: deadly) combination of both. I hate to perpetuate stereotypes, but in this case - it's true. Mammajamma has a bad f'ng temper, the weird thing is that most of the time I'm so docile, passive, and sweet but certain things make my blood boil.

Which makes me think of the maxim "blowing a gasket," I tried to google its origin but had no luck, but itsn't it so delightfully visual, that expression? Well, I have to be careful that I don't ever get hypertension, I mean being Hispanic, what are the chances right? LOL! Anyway, sometimes I get so angry, I literally shake or see red, or get a pounding headache. Literally! Not good!

I really need to get back into yoga, and let no man tear me asunder from my peace. My talented older sis, who's a NYC teacher in an elementary school, tells me that she tells her students to "save the drama, for their mamma!" Love it! like seriously, take that sh*t elsewhere, it's not welcome here!

Anyway, on some good notes, I have to share:


Gabriel Garcia Marquez celebrated his 80th birthday yesterday and "told friends that he has begun writing his second volume of memoirs"--a happy contrast to his statement last year that he had "run out of gas" for writing. The report comes not from Marquez himself, but friend and collaborator Plinio Apuleyo Mendoza.


Read more here:
http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/la-et-marquez7mar07,1,6987302.story?ctrack=1&cset=true

Monday, February 12, 2007

LATINA POET'S FESTIVAL 2007

Announced today:


PUERTO RICAN TRAVELING THEATRE
PRESENTS
LATINA POET'S FESTIVAL 2007 --Celebration of its 40th Anniversary--
For the first time in its 40 year history, the Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre will be presenting twelve of the hottest, cutting edge Latina poets and performers in an exciting festival at its permanent theater, 304 West 47th Street, in the heart of Broadway, beginning Thursday, March 8, 2007 at 8 p.m.

SANDRA MARÍA ESTEVES, the revered Puerto Rican poet often referred to as the ‘Godmother of Nuyorican Letters’, MARIPOSA, one of the most dynamic, young poets of the New York Latino scene, as well as all time favorites LA BRUJA, the powerhouse performer PATTY DUKES, the queen of the college poetry circuit LINDA NIEVES-POWELL, and the fiery PRISIONERA have joined the roster of performers who will be participating for 8 performances at the Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre. Adding their talent to this special theatrical event will be veterans such as CARMEN D. LUCCA, DRA. MIRNA NIEVES and the popular RHINA VÁLENTIN, along with the seasoned, award winning poets CARMEN VALLE and LOURDES VAZQUEZ.

MIRIAM COLÓN VALLE, Founder of the theater, will be the Director and Producer, JACK LANDRON will co-produce, SOLEDAD ROMERO will be Literary Advisor, and MIRIAM CRUZ will interpret some of their works.

Throughout the years, the Puerto Rican Traveling Theater has established a consistent record as a professional, bilingual theater company which has added diversity and quality productions to the New York theatrical landscape. The company, founded by the Puerto Rican actress Miriam Colón, has been an Actors Equity company since 1967, and has become a mecca for Hispanic and mainstream audiences who enjoy high quality, professional bilingual productions.
Opening night for the LATINA POETS FESTIVAL 2007 will be on Thursday, March 8, 2007 at 8:00 p.m. Performances also on Fridays and Saturdays at 8:00 p.m. Sunday performances will be at 3:00 p.m. only. This limited engagement production will run only till Sunday, March 18 at the Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre, 304 West 47th Street, between 8th and 9th Avenues. Admission is $20 or $15 for properly identified students or senior citizens. TDF is OK. Reservations: 212-354-1293.

Purchase tickets at www.telecharge.com. Click on Puerto Rican Traveling Theater.

The Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre’s Mainstage presentations are possible thanks to the generosity of the New York State Council on the Arts, New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Manhattan Borough President Scott M. Stringer, Bronx Borough President Adolfo Carrión, Jr., Shubert Foundation, National Endowmend for the Arts, American Express, American Theatre Wing, Carnegie Corporation of New York, TIAA-CREF, Edith C. Blum Foundation, New York City Council, Hispanic Federation, JPMorgan Chase, and individual supporters. The Puerto Rican Traveling Theatre is grateful to their Media Sponsor: Urban Latino Magazine.

Thursday, January 11, 2007

Is Herman Badillo Right, Do We Not Value Education?

So everyone is taking about Herman Badillo's book, One Nation, One Standard: An Ex-Liberal on How Hispanics Can Succeed Just Like Other Immigrant Groups. In fact a lot of brouhaha is stirring, which will surely sell him a lot of books and also open up a much needed discourse on education. I wanted to bring up the topic here to address a couple of points but also see what your thoughts were on the book and the issues.


From the Baltimore Sun:



Mr. Badillo, 77, the first native-born Puerto Rican elected to Congress, is
being criticized for writing in his new book, One Nation, One Standard, that too
many of his fellow Hispanic-Americans are stuck in poverty because they don't
value education.


"Education is not a high priority in the Hispanic community," wrote Mr. Badillo.

"Hispanic parents rarely get involved with their children's schools. They seldom attend parent-teacher conferences, ensure that children do their homework or inspire their children to dream of attending
college."

Unfortunately, Mr. Badillo is right, and not only about Hispanics.
Indifference to education is unfortunately epidemic across racial and ethnic
lines, and it is particularly damaging to the poor. For earlier waves of
immigrants to America, unskilled jobs were much more plentiful. Upward mobility
for most of today's kids requires at least a couple of years of schooling beyond
high school.

Yet instead of discussing the points Mr. Badillo raises, many will try
to shout him down. Bronx Democratic leader Jose Rivera has blasted Mr. Badillo
in a New York Post interview as being a "total insult" to Latino parents. That's
OK, Mr. Badillo says. He wanted to stir up a dialogue. The controversy will help
him sell a few more books too. Puerto Ricans certainly are not the only
Americans who need to read it.


Read the entire article here:



I agree that in my experience many parents in the Puerto Rican community do not focus on their children's education. In fact, having grown up in Spanish Harlem in very close proximity to the Jewish community around the upper east side I have admired the cultural importance that they place on education and the arts.

I haven't read the book and was infuriated to read that in discussing the book the Wall Street Journal referred to Badillo as an immigrant -Newsflash: Puerto Ricans are US Citizens, whether they live in the States or the Island. The ones who have migrated to the mainland are emigrants. You would think that a journalist would know better.


But maybe Badillo did it to himself because his title implies that ALL Hispanics are immigrants, which isn't always true.


What do you all think about the issue?

Thursday, December 21, 2006

Pa Que Lo Sepas!


How fantastic is this?


I just got my newsletter from Criticas (which I love reading & just had to share).


López Nieves Wins Puerto Rican Literature Award
By María Elena Cruz — December 15, 2006

The Institute of Puerto Rican Literature announced this month that López Nieves's novel El corazón de Voltaire (Voltaire's Heart) is the winner of the Premio Nacional de Literatura (National Literature Prize). This is the second time López Nieves has won this prize, and the first time a single author has been given this award twice. In 2000, he won the Premio Nacional de Literatura for La verdadera muerte de Juan Ponce de León (The true death of Juan Ponce de León), a collection of short stories. The prize consists of $6000.

"I really did not expected to win this award twice since it has never happened before," a surprised López Nieves told Críticas. "I feel like this novel has a life of its own." El corazón de Voltaire tells the story of Roland Luziers, a professor of genetics at the Sorbonne, and Dr. Ysabeau de Vassy, a historian, who set out to establish the authenticity of Voltaire's heart, which rests at Paris's Bibliotheque Nationale.

López Nieves is also the author of the historical novel Seva (Editorial Cordillera, 2003), and Escribir para Rafa (To Write for Rafa), a collection of short stories.



They also have a great feature on The Best Adult Books of 2006:
http://www.criticasmagazine.com/article/CA6401082.html
 
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