Showing posts with label New York Times. Show all posts
Showing posts with label New York Times. Show all posts

Friday, September 12, 2014

#FridayReads: A Cup of Water Under My Bed by Daisy Hernandez

A coming-of-age memoir by a Colombian-Cuban woman about shaping lessons from home into a new, queer life

In this lyrical, coming-of-age memoir, Daisy Hernández chronicles what the women in her Cuban-Colombian family taught her about love, money, and race. Her mother warns her about envidia and men who seduce you with pastries, while one tía bemoans that her niece is turning out to be “una india” instead of an American. Another auntie instructs that when two people are close, they are bound to become like uña y mugre, fingernails and dirt, and that no, Daisy’s father is not godless. He’s simply praying to a candy dish that can be traced back to Africa. 

These lessons—rooted in women’s experiences of migration, colonization, y cariño—define in evocative detail what it means to grow up female in an immigrant home. In one story, Daisy sets out to defy the dictates of race and class that preoccupy her mother and tías, but dating women and transmen, and coming to identify as bisexual, leads her to unexpected questions. In another piece, NAFTA shuts local factories in her hometown on the outskirts of New York City, and she begins translating unemployment forms for her parents, moving between English and Spanish, as well as private and collective fears. In prose that is both memoir and commentary, Daisy reflects on reporting for the New York Times as the paper is rocked by the biggest plagiarism scandal in its history and plunged into debates about the role of race in the newsroom.

A heartfelt exploration of family, identity, and language, A Cup of Water Under My Bed is ultimately a daughter’s story of finding herself and her community, and of creating a new, queer life.

Daisy Hernández grew up in Fairview, New Jersey in a Cuban-Colombian family. She's worked at the New York Times, Jenny Craigs, McDonald's, and ColorLines magazine (though not in that order) and has made home in Virginia, Florida, California, England, and the Upper East Side (though again not in that order). She is the author of "A Cup of Water Under My Bed: A Memoir" (Beacon Press, 2014) and coeditor of the anthology "Colonize This! Young Women of Color on Today's Feminism" (Seal Press, 2002). 

Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, the National Catholic Reporter, bitch magazine, Ms. magazine, the Christian Science Monitor, Fourth Genre, and Bellingham Review. A former editor of ColorLines magazine, she has an MFA in fiction from the University of Miami and an MA in Latin American Studies and Journalism from New York University.

Friday, October 11, 2013

#FridayReads: Hunting Season: Immigration and Murder in an All-American Town By Mirta Ojito

Library Reads describes Hunting Season: Immigration and Murder in an All-American Town By Mirta Ojito, as a book which, "chronicles the events leading up to the 2008 murder of an undocumented Ecuadorian immigrant on Long Island, detailing the reactions of family and community members, government officials, civic leaders and public library staff. A nuanced and in-depth look at hate crimes, and a powerful story that deserves to be told.”

The true story of an immigrant's murder that turned a quaint village on the Long Island shore into ground zero in the war on immigration 

In November 2008, Marcelo Lucero, a thirty-seven-year-old undocumented Ecuadorean immigrant, was attacked and murdered by a group of teenagers as he walked the streets of the Long Island village of Patchogue accompanied by a childhood friend. The attackers were out “hunting for beaners.” Chasing, harassing, and assaulting defenseless “beaners”—their slur for Latinos—was part of their weekly entertainment, some of the teenagers later confessed. Latinos—primarily men and not all of them immigrants—have become the target of hate crimes in recent years as the nation wrestles with swelling numbers of undocumented immigrants, the suburbs become the newcomers’ first destination, and public figures advance their careers by spewing anti-immigration rhetoric. 

Lucero, an unassuming worker at a dry cleaner’s, became yet another victim of anti-immigration fever. In the wake of his death, Patchogue was catapulted into the national limelight as this formerly unremarkable suburb of New York became ground zero in the war on immigration. In death, Lucero became a symbol of everything that was wrong with our broken immigration system: fewer opportunities to obtain visas to travel to the United States, porous borders, a growing dependency on cheap labor, and the rise of bigotry. 

Drawing on firsthand interviews and on-the-ground reporting, journalist Mirta Ojito has crafted an unflinching portrait of one community struggling to reconcile the hate and fear underlying the idyllic veneer of their all-American town. With a strong commitment to telling all sides of the story, Ojito unravels the engrossing narrative with objectivity and insight, providing an invaluable look at one of America’s most pressing issues. 

Mirta "Ojito has received several awards, including the American Society of Newspaper Editor's writing award for best foreign reporting in 1999 for her stories about life in Cuba, and a shared Pulitzer for national reporting in 2001 for a New York Times series about race in America. She is a graduate of Florida Atlantic University and of the mid-career master's degree program at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism, where she now works as a full time assistant professor. You can tweet her @MirtaOjito

Start reading!

Sunday, February 03, 2013

Sonia Sotomayor's memoir "My Beloved World" hits #1

"Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor's memoir "My Beloved World" hit number one on the New York Times bestsellers list for hardcover nonfiction."

I am so pleased about this memoir's reach but there's a little irony here, 4-5 years ago I suggested to an undisclosed editor that they reach out to Sonia and offer her a book deal for her remarkable story. I was gently dismissed - "it wouldn't sell, she was "too young"... It's amazing to me now, how well her book is doing and demonstrates to me that I should always trust my instincts in spite of of naysayers because I am usually spot on. Bravo, Sonia!

 

Friday, February 01, 2013

Lit Links & Scoops: Gender, YouTube, Books+

English: The Brandsphere
The Brandsphere (Photo: Wikipedia)
Where I file and list all the good stuff for you:

- Latina's Magazine top 9 must-reads of 2012 here

- Cheryl Sandberg on Gender Stereotypes in the Workplace:

“We hold ourselves back in ways both big and small, by lacking self-confidence, by not raising our hands, and by pulling back when we should be leaning in,” Sandberg writes in the book, called “Lean In.” - via NYTimes

"As a woman becomes more successful, she is less liked, and as a man becomes more successful, he is more liked, and that starts with those T-shirts." She blasted managers who unconsciously reflect stereotypes when they judge women's performance, saying: "She's great at her job but she's just not as well liked by her peers," or: "She's a bit aggressive." via the Guardian

- I found this so interesting when I studied it for my Anthropology major - Drug Doses and the Gender Gap - via NYTimes

- Simply brilliant: "If you haven’t brought in someone with an understanding of basic marketing principles who simultaneously studies how new technologies are changing human behavior, then you are likely flying blind and will get caught up in the wrong metrics." Brian Solis, Without a social media strategy you are wasting your time

- ROI on Video? "Gangnam Style, the most-watched YouTube video ever, with more than one billion views, by K-pop sensation Psy, has generated $8 million revenue from YouTube" Via qz.comn

- Also on "What are the 10 Most Subscribed YouTube Channels - 2013?"-- Via YouTube

- You know that concept "birds of a feather, the company you keep..." Well, it seems to be true: "Harvard Professor Finds That Innovative Ideas Spread Like The Flu" - via FastCompany



Friday, December 07, 2012

Lit Links & Scoops

Between moving, the holidays and getting a promotion at work things have been a bit hectic so please forgive my absence and enjoy some links to the most interesting news I've seen all recently.

Triple spiral, celtic triskele is sometimes called the spiral of life.
It was found in Newgrange site in Bronze age (or older) Ireland.
 It remained in Celtic art for 3,000 years.
Celts believed all life moved in eternal cycles,
regenerating at each point.
 All important things came in three phases:
birth, death and rebirth. Mind, body & spirit.
Slate curated a list of The Overlooked Books of 2012, which mentions both, I Am an Executioner by Rajesh Parameswaran and Monstress by Lysley Tenorio that are worth a look.

Readers interested in Machismo and Mexico might take a look at ALMOST NEVER. By Daniel Sada featured in the NY Times 100 Notable Books of 2012 list. You can find more good reads with “Best of” lists created by NPR,Publishers WeeklyEsquireHuffPo and The Guardian

Deadspin made me laugh with their The Hater’s Guide To The Williams-Sonoma Catalog.

Women, social roles, and the intellectual situation. Whoosh!

Publishing's lack of Latino Literature put on blast here. But perhaps it's just a matter of awareness and accessibility  Blogger Mary Ann Reilly has curated an awe inspiring list of Latino/a Books for Elementary Children, see part 1, part 2, part 3. Nicely done, folks!

I am super excited about the Future of Consumer Intelligence conference I am working, not only do I get to head back to San Francisco but I get to hangout with some of the brightest minds who are shaping the high-technology revolution as it intersects with marketing and business opportunities for the future.

Speaking of mind melds, Scientists Discover Children’s Cells Living in Mothers’ Brain.

Mother Jones shines a light on sexism within the video game industry.

This etymology of the C-word makes me reconsider my hatred of it.

The perfect books to gift for the Holidays: Gran Cocina Latina: The Food of Latin America by Maricel E. Presilla and This Is How You Lose Her by Junot Díaz.

I love that Maria Popova, the mastermind of the Brain Pickings blog, was featured in the Times.

The OCM Bocas Prize for Caribbean Literature for 2013 is now open for submissions.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation Global Libraries Initiative is asking some well-crafted questions of this kind in a survey I’d urge you to fill out.

A new initiative is focusing on libraries around the world as centers of social and economic change.



Friday, August 31, 2012

Lit Links & Scoops

I'm moving out of town this weekend so this will be a short one. Have a great holiday weekend, everyone!

- Good News: Some of my photography will used in a documentary currently in production: Mayan Predictions, Myth or Reality by Tom Martens. To learn more about the project visit Mayan

- What Kind of Book Reader Are You? Diagnose yourself here

- Don’t think social will go away via Forbes

- Don't do it: The Best Book Reviews Money Can Buy via NY Times

- I discovered The Vanishers By Heidi Julavits on the Oprah.com website and devoured it this weekend. It was a fascinating mix of time travel, supernatural and feminist discourse that kept me enraptured in spite of all the packing I needed to do - not that I was procrastinating or anything.

- Cool infographic: The DNA of a successful book via mashable

- 5 Ideas That Will Change the World by 2025 - things to think about 

- Oldie but goodie: 47 Mind-Blowing Psychological Facts You Should Know About Yourself here

- Take a trip back in time to old Puerto Rico: Visit the ARCHIVO HISTORICO Y FOTOGRAFICO DE PUERTO RICO's photostream

- Places where it's okay to be an atheist: run away, run away
- Get ready for autumn: Asopao de Camarones recipe 

and remember:

“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, 'Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous?' Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. [universe] Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It's not just in some of us; it's in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.” 
― Marianne Williamson, Return to Love: Reflections on the Principles of "A Course in Miracles"



Friday, August 10, 2012

Lit links & Scoops

Where I collect and share all the interesting random things I've read all week:

- The Slave Who Circumnavigated The World via The Awl

- Brazilian author Clarah Averbuck on why she wrote Cat Life: ""Unfortunately, Brazil is still a very sexist country. Girls are still seen like objects. The most important thing a woman can do is just be pretty, and it's a shame," she says." via NPR

- See Also: “I’m like, ‘I just made history and people are focused on my hair?’” Gabby Douglas rocks.

- Love: A Booklover’s Map of Literary Geography circa 1933 via BrainPickings

- Oddballs: People Without Facebook Accounts Are 'Suspicious.' on Forbes

- Stress-Free: Recipe for 1x/week Cleansing/Detox Bath Soak via Whole Living

- 7 Foods a Nutritionist Would Never Eat via Shape

- THE SEARCH FOR THE NEXT SRIRACHA - How To Make Sofrito, The DIY Condiment brought to you by The Awl

- Holy bat babies - Cuteness!

- Why dating artists is a terrible idea: I INSPIRED A "BAD" VERSION OF MYSELF ON AARON SORKIN'S "THE NEWSROOM" via xoJane.

- And now you know: How Advertisers Convinced Americans They Smelled Bad: A schoolgirl and a former traveling Bible salesman helped turn deodorants and antiperspirants from niche toiletries into an $18 billion industry via Smithsonian

- Colson Whitehead's novel Zone One is a post-apocalyptic tale of a Manhattan crippled by a plague and overrun with zombies. He explains that he created the novel, in part, to pay homage to the grimy 1970s New York of his childhood. at NPR

- Also How to Write By COLSON WHITEHEAD - awesomeness via NYTimes.

- The Daily Chicana on Remembering My Brown-Skinned Dolls via Racialicious

- Chinese/Jamaican Poet StacyAnn Chin talks about being a single mother, in-vitro fertilization,and how her decision to have a child was met by the Black and LGBT community. Read more at Mater Mea.

- Read MOLLY RINGWALD's story about Infidelity here

- This October, Designers & Books are hosting the first-ever book fair in New York City to focus on architecture and design book publishing. Go here.

- Amazing #1: Site tells you what an awesome social media early adopter you are via ShinyShiny
- Amazing #2: AMAZON: We now buy more Kindle eBooks than printed books Here.

- Style, yes please: 20 fashion-focused Pinterest accounts via Mashable.

- Nicely done: A gender free toy store -Harrods Department Store via The Mary Sue

- The PlayTales App Teaches Your Kids To Love Books With Interactive Kids Stories via MakeUseof

- I cannot wait to go to the Netherlands this fall: AMSTERDAM CITY GUIDE: WHY I LOVE AMSTERDAM, THE GREATEST LITTLE CITY IN WORLD via MeltingButter.

Monday, July 30, 2012

New Book: Before the Rain: A Memoir of Love and Revolution by Luisita Lopez Torregrosa

I have to admit that when I initially spotted Before the Rain: A Memoir of Love and Revolution by Luisita Lopez Torregrosa the cover took my breath away. It was just as beautiful when my review copy came in the mail, two weeks ago. I look forward to reading this one.


In a voice haunting and filled with longing, Before the Rain tells the story of love unexpected, its fragile bounds and subtle perils. As a newspaper editor in the ’80s, Luisita Torregrosa lived her career. 


Enter Elizabeth, a striking, reserved, and elusive writer with whom Torregrosa falls deeply in love. Their story—irresistible romance, overlapping ambitions, and fragile union—unfolds as the narrative shifts to the Philippines and the fall of Ferdinand Marcos


There, on that beautiful, troubled island, the couple creates a world of their own, while covering political chaos and bloody upheavals. What was effortless abroad becomes less idyllic when they return to the United States, and their ending becomes as surprising and revealing as their beginning. 


Torregrosa captures the way love transforms those who experience it for an unforgettable, but often too brief, time. This book is distinguished not only by its strong, unique, and conflicted heroines, but also by Torregrosa’s lyrical portrait of the Philippines and the even more exotic heart of intimacy.


Luisita López Torregrosa is the author of The Noise of Infinite Longing and was an editor at the New York Times. As a special correspondent for the San Francisco Chronicle she reported firsthand on the coup attempts against President Corazon Aquino, the communist insurgency in the Philippines, and the protests in South Korea that led to the fall of authoritarian rule. Her articles also have appeared in Vanity Fair, New York Times, Condé Nast Traveler, and Vogue. Follow her via Twitter @luisitalt.


You can read a short excerpt here.


If you enjoy it, you also might want to check out her other book, The Noise of Infinite Longing: A Memoir of a Family--And an IslandA beautifully written memoir about a Puerto Rican family, whose siblings reunite for the first time upon their mother's death, after having scattered to various places and various lives after they reached early adulthood. It is also a universal story about family connections and what happens to them as we grow up.

Thursday, June 28, 2007

Book News: Asturia Prize

Asturias Prize

The Israeli author Amos Oz, below, was named the winner yesterday of the $65,000 2007 Prince of Asturias award for literature, given by the Prince of Asturias Foundation and named for its patron, Crown Prince Felipe of Asturias, heir to the Spanish throne, Agence France-Presse reported. The jury said that Mr. Oz had “fashioned the Hebrew language into a brilliant instrument for literary art and the truthful disclosure of the most dire and universal realities of our time, focusing especially on advocating peace amongst peoples and condemning all forms of fanaticism.” His books include “Where the Jackals Howl and Other Stories” and “My Michael.”


Previous winners include Mario Vargas Llosa, Günter Grass, Doris Lessing, Arthur Miller and Paul Auster. ... The Mexican writer Elena Poniatowska has been awarded the Rómulo Gallegos prize for literature for her novel “El Tren Pasa Primero” (“The Train Passes First”), The Associated Press reported from Caracas, Venezuela. The book tells of a railroad worker who engages in the struggle for labor rights in Mexico. The prize, awarded every two years for what is deemed to be the best Spanish-language novel, was created in 1967 and named for the Venezuelan novelist and former President Rómulo Gallegos.


Via: www.nytimes.com
 
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