Showing posts with label NPR. Show all posts
Showing posts with label NPR. Show all posts

Friday, August 10, 2012

Lit links & Scoops

Where I collect and share all the interesting random things I've read all week:

- The Slave Who Circumnavigated The World via The Awl

- Brazilian author Clarah Averbuck on why she wrote Cat Life: ""Unfortunately, Brazil is still a very sexist country. Girls are still seen like objects. The most important thing a woman can do is just be pretty, and it's a shame," she says." via NPR

- See Also: “I’m like, ‘I just made history and people are focused on my hair?’” Gabby Douglas rocks.

- Love: A Booklover’s Map of Literary Geography circa 1933 via BrainPickings

- Oddballs: People Without Facebook Accounts Are 'Suspicious.' on Forbes

- Stress-Free: Recipe for 1x/week Cleansing/Detox Bath Soak via Whole Living

- 7 Foods a Nutritionist Would Never Eat via Shape

- THE SEARCH FOR THE NEXT SRIRACHA - How To Make Sofrito, The DIY Condiment brought to you by The Awl

- Holy bat babies - Cuteness!

- Why dating artists is a terrible idea: I INSPIRED A "BAD" VERSION OF MYSELF ON AARON SORKIN'S "THE NEWSROOM" via xoJane.

- And now you know: How Advertisers Convinced Americans They Smelled Bad: A schoolgirl and a former traveling Bible salesman helped turn deodorants and antiperspirants from niche toiletries into an $18 billion industry via Smithsonian

- Colson Whitehead's novel Zone One is a post-apocalyptic tale of a Manhattan crippled by a plague and overrun with zombies. He explains that he created the novel, in part, to pay homage to the grimy 1970s New York of his childhood. at NPR

- Also How to Write By COLSON WHITEHEAD - awesomeness via NYTimes.

- The Daily Chicana on Remembering My Brown-Skinned Dolls via Racialicious

- Chinese/Jamaican Poet StacyAnn Chin talks about being a single mother, in-vitro fertilization,and how her decision to have a child was met by the Black and LGBT community. Read more at Mater Mea.

- Read MOLLY RINGWALD's story about Infidelity here

- This October, Designers & Books are hosting the first-ever book fair in New York City to focus on architecture and design book publishing. Go here.

- Amazing #1: Site tells you what an awesome social media early adopter you are via ShinyShiny
- Amazing #2: AMAZON: We now buy more Kindle eBooks than printed books Here.

- Style, yes please: 20 fashion-focused Pinterest accounts via Mashable.

- Nicely done: A gender free toy store -Harrods Department Store via The Mary Sue

- The PlayTales App Teaches Your Kids To Love Books With Interactive Kids Stories via MakeUseof

- I cannot wait to go to the Netherlands this fall: AMSTERDAM CITY GUIDE: WHY I LOVE AMSTERDAM, THE GREATEST LITTLE CITY IN WORLD via MeltingButter.

Monday, June 15, 2009

On the Homeless Front

I don't usually write about such politically charged topics but there were two items recently that came to my attention that I felt I needed to discuss. Both are related to homelessness. I've know many people who have been homeless or have been unfortunate enough to have to stay at homeless shelters. None of them were mentally ill, or drug addicts. Most of them were simply ordinary people who lost their apartments because of domestic isssues, were unable to pay their rent, ran out of relatives to stay with or had some sort of natural disaster.

When I read that people were up in uproar over a an upscale building in Brooklyn that the city turned into a temp. shelter, I was rather disgusted by humanity's selfishness and greediness. The place has granite countertops, terraces, marble bathrooms and walk-in closets. It was meant to be a luxury condo building however because of the economy the developer had to turn to other means to not lose all profits.

Now, it seems some people were rather upset by the idea of homeless people "living large."

"I'm a hardworking taxpayer, and I don't think homeless people should be living better than me," fumed Desmond John, 35, a window salesman who wanted to rent one of the fancy apartments. "They said it's not for rent. It's a shelter. I was shocked."
I'm also a hardworking taxpayer but somehow I think it's rather unfair to decide how someone 'should live' based on their place/status in society. To say people, don't deserve to be there is just wrong and very sour grapes. That's another human being, just like you. First of all, it's a temporary situation and perhaps it's a rather nice reprieve for someone who has suffered to get to stay in such a place for a little while. Uplifting and renewing.

In that same vein, NPR introduced us to "Homeless advocate Eric Sheptock [who] uses technology to get his message out. Though he's homeless himself, he keeps a blog, a Facebook page and a Twitter account. He spends a lot of time in the city's public libraries, where he gets free access to a computer. There he can check his e-mail account and write his blog — called On the Clock with Eric Sheptock — which has so far attracted hundreds of readers. He recently wrote about his concern that the homeless shelter he now lives in is in danger of closing. "

How amazing is that!

Learn more about Eric at www.npr.org
 
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