Showing posts with label Latina. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Latina. Show all posts

Friday, November 13, 2015

#FridayReads:A House of My Own: Stories from My Life by Sandra Cisneros

The making of a Latina writer. Award-winning novelist, poet, and MacArthur Fellow Sandra Cisneros shares the stories of her life.

From the author of The House on Mango Street, a richly illustrated compilation of true stories and nonfiction pieces that, taken together, form a jigsaw autobiography—an intimate album of a beloved literary legend. 
From the Chicago neighborhoods where she grew up and set her groundbreaking The House on Mango Street to her abode in Mexico in a region where “my ancestors lived for centuries,” the places Sandra Cisneros has lived have provided inspiration for her now-classic works of fiction and poetry. But a house of her own, where she could truly take root, has eluded her. With this collection—spanning three decades, and including never-before-published work—Cisneros has come home at last.  
Ranging from the private (her parents’ loving and tempestuous marriage) to the political (a rallying cry for one woman’s liberty in Sarajevo) to the literary (a tribute to Marguerite Duras), and written with her trademark lyricism, these signature pieces recall transformative memories as well as reveal her defining artistic and intellectual influences. Poignant, honest, deeply moving, this is an exuberant celebration of a life in writing lived to the fullest.

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Friday, June 14, 2013

Lit Links and Scoops

Your weekly link pack:

To be, or not to be a Latino Author

- Mexico’s illiteracy problem is growing worse

- I'm sort of obsessed with Joss & Main, a home goods limited sale site.

- A list of the 2013 International Latino Book Awards Winners! via @mamiversebooks

- Racism on Twitter - yet again.

- Watcha Magazine is seeking advertiser. Be part of the 1st Latino Hip hop Magazine in the Nation! Shoot them an email at info@watchamag.com.

- Moms Turn to Tech to Get Kids Access to Latino Authors via ABC News

- Podcast: 200 Years of Latino History in Philadelphia" by WHYY Public Media via soundcloud

- "The idea that larger, traditional publishing houses—like Simon & Schuster, Alfred K. Knopf and
MacMillan—are passing over Hispanic authors, despite the quality of work and incredible niche in the book market, is disappointing." via Voxxi

- Great essay: the truth about multicultural stories via the Rumpus

- Have you joined this amazing group of Latina Bloggers yet? Join on Facebook.

- Very excited about Guillermo Del Toro's book, The Strain, coming to TV. Via Screenrant I also want to catch up on the BBC miniseries, In the Flesh, that I missed. iTunes, here I come.

- A fascinating map of the world’s most and least racially tolerant countries via Washington Post

- Great read: "The Truth About Bicultural Consumers and How Marketers Are Taking Notice Cultural Identity Is Crucial and Should Be Represented in Media" via AdAge.

- FX Courts Latinos (hard) for Crime Thriller 'The Bridge' - Early screenings, Q&As in bilingual media and a multicity mural project help boost awareness among a potential Hispanic viewership of 48 million. via Hollywood Reporter.

The Future Silicon Valley: Latina Coders via SV Latino

- Simón Bolívar: The Latin American Hero Many Americans Don’t Know via Time

- Am I an ‘Immigrant Writer’? By AMIT MAJMUDAR

Well done, Bacardi!


Check out these two new projects that need your help:

2013 indigogo Video from Renzo Devia / Creador Pictures on Vimeo.




Monday, September 24, 2012

New Book: Latina Girls and Sexual Identity by Lorena Garcia

If you've ever wondered if Latina girls are doomed to a sexually stigmatized life, you might want to read this new study, Protect Yourself, Respect Yourself: Latina Girls and Sexual Identity, from Lorena Garcia, an Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

While Latina girls have high teen birth rates and are at increasing risk for contracting sexually transmitted infections, their sexual lives are much more complex than the negative stereotypes of them as “helpless” or “risky” (or worse) suggest. 


In Respect Yourself, Protect Yourself, Lorena Garcia examines how Latina girls negotiate their emerging sexual identities and attempt to create positive sexual experiences for themselves. Through a focus on their sexual agency, Garcia demonstrates that Latina girls’ experiences with sexism, racism, homophobia and socioeconomic marginality inform how they engage and begin to rework their meanings and processes of gender and sexuality, emphasizing how Latina youth themselves understand their sexuality, particularly how they conceptualize and approach sexual safety and pleasure. 


At a time of controversy over the appropriate role of sex education in schools, Respect Yourself, Protect Yourself, provides a rare look and an important understanding of the sexual lives of a traditionally marginalized group.

Tuesday, July 05, 2011

Large and In Charge: Latina Millenials

I came across some very cool Twitter infographics today and one of them included this section:

Thursday, October 14, 2010

Join Me Tomorrow for a Live BlogTalkRadio Show on The Latina Mosaic: Strength in Diversity

I'll be hosting a conversation between Selina McLemore, Senior Editor at Grand Central Publishing, Leila Cobo, journalist and author of TELL ME SOMETHING TRUE, and Belinda M. Gonzalez-Leon from the National Hispana Leadership Institute, on how Latinas are strengthening the social fabric of this country, the upcoming Leadership Conference, and the Mujer Awards, tomorrow on Blogtalkradio.com at 1:30pm ET.

Don't miss your chance to call in and chat with us or listen in!

Show Information:
Hispanic Heritage Month - The Latina Mosaic: Strength in Diversity
10/15/2010 1:30 PM ET
Call-in Number: (646) 378-0039 or listen online

Monday, March 01, 2010

Tostitos Salsa & the Carmen Miranda/Chiquita Banana/Sexy Señorita Image

As someone who has almost zero interest in sports or watching them on TV, it was only this weekend that I happened to spot this Frito Lay Salsa commercial, created for the football season:


At first glance, I thought it was really creative and cool, had great music, and I love the animation, but it also stirred some discomfort in me that I had to process and I would love to hear your thoughts on...

First, the Carmen Miranda/Chiquita Banana/Sexy Señorita image has always both fascinated and repulsed me.

On one hand, she is beautiful, sultry, and seductive.

On the other, she only perpetuates the "stereotypical images of Latinos as perpetual fun-seekers, flirts, and flamboyant dancers,” always coming across as sexualized objects of entertainment and servitude.

As a Latina woman, the issues go even deeper: She is always overtly sexual. The singing and dancing while working theme is a direct tie to image of the slave, "happily" toiling and singing in the fields.

Since the stereotype is always associated with fruit and food, it only serves to sustain the image of the Latina, as the cook, the maid, always in the kitchen and perhaps the picking fields, always "dishing" it out. The fact that she's got on full make-up, tats, a flamenco outfit, high heels, and dancing, gives it a humiliating caricaturisating Sambo touch.

Then there is the slicing and dicing, yet another link to another stereotype: A Latina who will cut you. Only this time, it's her skirt that is doing the chopping. A nod to the vagina dentata archetype, perhaps?

She blooms in the garden, opening up like that "Spanish Harlem Rose" that's been neglected and waiting to be cultivated, lending some element of magical realism that is only apropos of the animation and ninja stylized stunts. (After all, we all know that Latinas and all people of color have magical powers, see Magical Negro).

She's one with nature, dancing and spinning like some insatiable whirling dervish, picking "fruit" off trees - a salute to Eve and her sin? Hot as hell but tempting too, no?

And even the music is muy caliente - The Weatherston Hays' track used is "Hot Sauce," described on their site as a "spicy blend of hot and hotter." Yum! Gotta love that blend!

In the end, perhaps, I've gone overboard. Perhaps, I just like to analyze and scrutinize art too much and it's all a stretch here. Maybe the makers of the ad were acutely aware of all of this and it's all actually commentary turned over on its head to promote a product that is ultimately Latino in essence, making it genius...

Or is it just the same old, historical stereotype refined and digitized for a new generation?

You decide...

Updated to add one more thought:

I remembered after a comment from a fellow blogger via email that I left one an additional issue. Rampant throughout the commercial is the transmogrification of Latino culture. We know Latinos to be a diverse group with diverse cultures, traditions and history. Yet we have a commercial for salsa (Mexican cuisine) with a dancer in a flamenco dress(Spain), dancing to some "latin" music...treating the Latino aspect as a whole, one homogenous synthesis of all they could fit in.

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Groundbreaking Moment: Obama Nominates Sotomayor for Supreme Court

Just a few hours ago, President Obama nominated federal appeals court judge Sonia Sotomayor as the first Hispanic to serve on the Supreme Court.




If confirmed, Sotomayor, 54, would be the first Supreme Court justice of Hispanic (Puerto Rican) descent and only the third woman ever to sit on the panel. She grew up in a Bronx housing project, went on to Princeton University and Yale Law School.



I watched this morning and felt as proud and teary-eyed as day Obama was sworn in. This is a major moment for Latinas in this country!

Monday, July 16, 2007

Do you know a groundbreaking Latina? Nominate her!

Nominations are now being accepted
for the 2007 "Groundbreaking Latina in Leadership" award,
sponsored by Volvo Cars of North America.

catalinamag.com/Latina_Award

Previous Groundbreaking Latina award recipients include:

- CNN’s Soledad O’Brien
- Sesame Street's Sonia Manzano
- Latin Grammy nominated singer JD Natasha
- Filmmaker Mercedes Jimenez Ramirez
- Former U.S. Treasurer Rosario Marin
- Executive Producer Barbara Martinez Jitner
- AFL-CIO leader Linda Chavez Thompson
- Artist Brandy Healy
- School board president Pearl Quinones
- Community leader Haydee Morales

Monday, June 04, 2007

Free Day of Latina Beauty!




 
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