Showing posts with label Guillermo del Toro. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Guillermo del Toro. Show all posts

Thursday, October 31, 2013

#FridayReads: Guillermo del Toro's Cabinet of Curiosities

If you want to see me squeak and squeal, geek out and get flustered and/or start hyperventilating, talk to me about the Guillermo del Toro Cabinet of Curiosities: My Notebooks, Collections, and Other Obsessions
by Guillermo Del Toro, Marc Zicree. It's funny back in early 2012, I wrote about how awesome it would be to be able to take a peek at what inspired Del Toro and apparently the internet gods answered.

I think this would make an excellent gift and if you're really fancy, there's a limited edition that retails for half a grand, no joke:

Over the last two decades, writer-director Guillermo del Toro has mapped out a territory in the popular imagination that is uniquely his own, astonishing audiences with Cronos, Hellboy, Pan's Labyrinth, and a host of other films and creative endeavors. Now, for the first time, del Toro reveals the inspirations behind his signature artistic motifs, sharing the contents of his personal notebooks, collections, and other obsessions. 

An intimate look into one of the most imaginative minds of this century, Guillermo del Toro's Cabinet of Curiosities reproduces the notes, the drawings, the untold creatures, and ideas of things to come that fill del Toro's fabled illustrated notebooks


This book will be a visual treasure trove for del Toro fans, as readers get a look at reproductions of his actual journal pages, filled with his handwriting, illustrations, notes in Spanish and English, as well as new annotations that add context and clarity.

The result is a startling, intimate glimpse into the life and mind of one of the world's most creative visionaries. Complete with running commentary, interview text, and annotations that contextualize the ample visual material, this deluxe compendium is every bit as inspired as del Toro is himself.

Contains a foreword by James Cameron, an afterword by Tom Cruise, and contributions from other luminaries, including Neil Gaiman and John Landis, among others.

This book includes diary entries and illustrations for the following del Toro movies, both green lit and not: 
  • Cronos
  • At the Mountains of Madness (as yet unmade)
  • The Count of Monte Cristo
  • Mephisto’s Bridge
  • Mimic
  • The Devil’s Backbone
  • Don’t be Afraid of the Dark
  • Blade 2
  • Hellboy
  • Pan’s Labryrinth
  • Hellboy 2
  • Pacific Rim

Born in Guadalajara, Mexico, Guillermo del Toro is the director of the films Cronos, Mimic, The Devil's Backbone, Blade II, Hellboy I, Hellboy II, and Pan's Labyrinth, which garnered enormous critical praise worldwide and won three Academy Awards.

Marc Scott Zicree has created classic episodes of "Star Trek-The Next Generation," "Deep Space Nine," "Babylon Five," "Sliders" and many more. He has appeared as a media expert on hundreds of radio and TV shows and is the author of the bestselling Twilight Zone Companion. He lives in West Hollywood with his wonderful wife, vile little dog, and affable big dog.

Friday, June 14, 2013

Lit Links and Scoops

Your weekly link pack:

To be, or not to be a Latino Author

- Mexico’s illiteracy problem is growing worse

- I'm sort of obsessed with Joss & Main, a home goods limited sale site.

- A list of the 2013 International Latino Book Awards Winners! via @mamiversebooks

- Racism on Twitter - yet again.

- Watcha Magazine is seeking advertiser. Be part of the 1st Latino Hip hop Magazine in the Nation! Shoot them an email at info@watchamag.com.

- Moms Turn to Tech to Get Kids Access to Latino Authors via ABC News

- Podcast: 200 Years of Latino History in Philadelphia" by WHYY Public Media via soundcloud

- "The idea that larger, traditional publishing houses—like Simon & Schuster, Alfred K. Knopf and
MacMillan—are passing over Hispanic authors, despite the quality of work and incredible niche in the book market, is disappointing." via Voxxi

- Great essay: the truth about multicultural stories via the Rumpus

- Have you joined this amazing group of Latina Bloggers yet? Join on Facebook.

- Very excited about Guillermo Del Toro's book, The Strain, coming to TV. Via Screenrant I also want to catch up on the BBC miniseries, In the Flesh, that I missed. iTunes, here I come.

- A fascinating map of the world’s most and least racially tolerant countries via Washington Post

- Great read: "The Truth About Bicultural Consumers and How Marketers Are Taking Notice Cultural Identity Is Crucial and Should Be Represented in Media" via AdAge.

- FX Courts Latinos (hard) for Crime Thriller 'The Bridge' - Early screenings, Q&As in bilingual media and a multicity mural project help boost awareness among a potential Hispanic viewership of 48 million. via Hollywood Reporter.

The Future Silicon Valley: Latina Coders via SV Latino

- Simón Bolívar: The Latin American Hero Many Americans Don’t Know via Time

- Am I an ‘Immigrant Writer’? By AMIT MAJMUDAR

Well done, Bacardi!


Check out these two new projects that need your help:

2013 indigogo Video from Renzo Devia / Creador Pictures on Vimeo.




Saturday, February 19, 2011

Orginal Fanboy from Guadalajara, Mexico: Guillermo del Toro in the New Yorker

Facisnating!
In 1926, Forrest Ackerman, a nine-year-old misfit in Los Angeles, visited a newsstand and bought a copy of Amazing Stories—a new magazine about aliens, monsters, and other oddities. By the time he reached the final page, he had become America’s first fanboy. He started a group called the Boys’ Scientifiction Club; in 1939, he wore an outer-space outfit to a convention for fantasy aficionados, establishing a costuming ritual still followed by the hordes at Comic-Con. Ackerman founded a cult magazine, Famous Monsters of Filmland, and, more lucratively, became an agent for horror and science-fiction writers. He crammed an eighteen-room house in Los Feliz with genre memorabilia, including a vampire cape worn by Bela Lugosi and a model of the pteranodon that tried to abscond with Fay Wray in “King Kong.” Ackerman eventually sold off his collection to pay medical bills, and in 2008 he died. He had no children.
But he had an heir. In 1971, Guillermo del Toro, the film director, was a seven-year-old misfit in Guadalajara, Mexico. He liked to troll the city sewers and dissolve slugs with salt. One day, in the magazine aisle of a supermarket, he came upon a copy of Famous Monsters of Filmland. He bought it, and was so determined to decode Ackerman’s pun-strewed prose—the letters section was called Fang Mail—that he quickly became bilingual. 

Read more at www.newyorker.com

Sunday, August 16, 2009

Stuff I'm Totally Sweating

I was lucky enough to finally get my hands on a copy of The Strain: Book One of The Strain Trilogy by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan (my review copy never came for some reason) and I read it in two days flat. It was a great read, the kind you don't want to end - I cannot wait for Book Two. I finished it right before the meteor shower, which made me a little creeped out - but you'll understand once you finished.

I was delighted to find how much of New York is covered in the action-packed book - from Spanish Harlem to Ground Zero - The Strain is a tour de force.


You can visit www.thestraintrilogy.com for more information.

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I recently bought Sally Hansen Cooling Foot Spray because a long time ago I fell for the sensation of cool tingly feet after trying my best friend's Kiss My Face peppermint foot cream.

This spray has multi vitamins and Tea Tree Oil and smells delightful. It's not only refreshing and antiseptic but also repels mosquitos. I've taken to spraying it all over my legs, especially on a sweltering day like today (it's 92 degrees today in NYC) but be warned it might sting a bit if you are freshly shaved.

Tuesday, May 12, 2009

From Pan's Labyrinth to New Vampire Novels: The Strain

“Pan’s Labyrinth” director Guillermo del Toro, who was born and raised in Guadalajara, Mexico, has collaborated with crime author Chuck Hogan on a trilogy of vampire novels, promised to be "epic in scope." Due out June 2nd.

Can't wait to read the first one! Anne Rice fans, are you with me? The Strain: Book One of The Strain Trilogy by Guillermo Del Toro, Chuck Hogan


Browse Inside this book
Get this for your site


Monday, September 10, 2007

The Orphanage - Movie to go see

Update (via Hollywood Reporter): "Director Guillermo del Toro is gearing up to produce a remake of the Spanish-language film The Orphanage. According to Variety, New Line is in advanced negotiations to produce this new American version.

Del Toro was a creative supervisor on the original film, which marked the directorial debut of Juan Antonio Bayona. The film's plot revolves around a woman who returns to run the orphanage where she was raised. She is terrified to find her own child playing with the imaginary friend that used to torture her when she was a child.

Warner Brothers is releasing the original film in Spain on October 11th. The American version does not have a set start date at this time."


I loved Pan's Labyrinth and since I love spooky films more than anything. I wan't wait to check out this Guillermo Del Toro production:



Reuter's review here

Friday, January 12, 2007

Support Hispanic Film: Movies to See This Weekend


Children of Men

Review:

Mexican director, Alfonso Cuarón once again proves his dexterity at turning his hand to different genres and subjects with this thrilling adaptation of a PD James novel, which is his first film since directing ‘Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban’ and his first screenwriting credit since his 2001 arthouse hit ‘Y Tu Mamá También’. Set in Britain in 2027, it’s a sort of sci-fi movie, but it’s the film’s nervous and energetic verité style, and creepy familiarity – not any wild vision of the future – that make it so involving. It helps, too, that Cuarón doesn’t allow the writing or the performances, most notably from Clive Owen and Michael Caine, to sink amid the film’s futuristic detail and pointed ideological concerns.

‘Children of Men’ is a clever and credible vision of London in the near future – a violent, paranoid, claustrophobic time when Britain is the only surviving nation, and a fertility crisis means that no babies have been born for 18 years. The Department of Homeland Security has ordered a militarised police to arrest all illegal immigrants and dispatch them to a fortified compound at Bexhill-on-Sea. Meanwhile, a rebel outfit of guerrilla refugees (or ‘fugees’) known as The Fish loom threateningly in the background, fighting for the rights of illegal immigrants and determined to cause major unrest. Cuarón’s smart trick is not to explain too much. Instead, he leaps straight in to his story, which is a good old-fashioned chase yarn that’s gilded with some unobtrusive and cheeky social commentary.

It’s civil servant Theo (Owen) – hapless innocent, reluctant hero and middling everyman – versus a miserable world in which his activist ex Julian (Julianne Moore) continues to take a political stand that he’s long since abandoned. It helps that Cuarón’s prognosis of the future is gripping from the off. Theo (wearing a faded ‘London 2012’ sweater) is buying a coffee on Fleet Street when he notices a news report on TV. The newsreader (a voice recognisable from television today) announces that the world’s youngest person, 18-year-old Diego, has died in a street brawl. It’s major news. The public weep. Theo takes a day off. And it’s no leap of the imagination to connect the reaction to Diego’s death with the death of Diana in 1997. It’s a moment that’s symbolic of Cuarón’s film: the future is not another planet, but a familiar version of our own.

The focus on migrancy and terrorism has an uneasy potency (not least when a bomb blows up Starbucks), and signals Cuarón’s determination to avoid distancing sci-fi tropes. It’s a film that could have been ridiculous. When Theo finds himself unwitting guardian to the only pregnant woman on earth (Claire-Hope Ashitey), a Messianic tone threatens to infect the film, but Cuarón backs off from stressing the Biblical overtones of James’s tale; at one point, he pointedly pulls the needle off a solemn John Tavener number and returns to the din of conflict as immigrants battle it out amid Bexhill’s ruins.In Cuarón’s hands, this film emerges as quite an achievement, both technically (look out for the impressive one-shot take that graces a battle scene late on; Cuarón resists the cut throughout) and dramatically (even Caine is amusing as Theo’s old mate Jasper, a cardigan-wearing, pot-smoking old sage).

It’s the director’s boldness that makes it work. He doesn’t bother with easy explanations, choosing instead to plunge straight into the action, shooting in a frenzied, documentary style (always handheld) and employing only the most necessary of special effects. His London is ours. The same red buses crawl the streets, only they’re older and more tatty. It rains incessantly and, though the city’s grey buildings are now adorned with moving-image advertising, the majority of our cityscape endures, from Brick Lane to the gloomy fly-overs of the East End. There’s fun to be had from all this – zebras roam St James’s Park and Picasso’s ‘Guernica’ now hangs in a (finally!) refurbished Battersea Power Station. But this is no joke: this is as real and as provocative as the future gets on screen. Dave Calhoun

Source : Time Out London Issue 1883: September 20-27 2006

http://www.childrenofmen.net/


Trailer:
http://www.apple.com/trailers/universal/childrenofmen/medium.html



Or:
Pan's Labyrinth

Synopsis


The guardian of a labyrinth tells a young girl that she is the long lost princess of a magical kingdom and sets her three dangerous tasks that she must complete in order to achieve her destiny.
Review:<

A girl on the cusp of adolescence is inducted into a threatening fantasy world where she discovers her own power. It’s a familiar, even archetypal story well suited to the dreamlike parallel reality of cinema: Alice, Wendy and Dorothy found their ways on screen and have been joined by the young heroines of ‘Labyrinth’, ‘Spirited Away’ and ‘Mirrormask’, to name just a few.
Pan’s Labyrinth’ is another version of the tale, but an unusual one in that it isn’t suitable for children. Not only is it replete with violence visited on the body, but its lessons – in the inadequacy of fantasy as a countermeasure to repression – might have sensitive youngsters chucking in the towel. As in ‘The Devil’s Backbone’ and a prospective new project, ‘3993’, Guillermo del Toro (who is Mexican) arranges his supernatural drama against the backdrop of the Spanish Civil War.


The setting is 1944, so the conflict proper is over, but skirmishes continue between anti-fascist guerrillas and forces under the command of sadistic, narcissistic Captain Vidal (Sergi López) – or ‘father’, as young Ofelia (Ivana Baquero) is instructed to address him when she arrives at his forest base with her pregnant, ailing mother (Ariadna Gil), Vidal’s new bride. The maid, Mercedes (Maribel Verdú), is friendly and in some ways a mirror character for Ofelia, but the girl is basically alone – until a large cricket transforms into a fairy and leads her to a crumbling stone maze in the grounds, where an ageing faun greets her as a lost princess, pending her completion of certain tasks…It’s no coincidence that the fairy appears after the double-killing that establishes this fable isn’t kids’ stuff, or that the jeopardy of Ofelia’s challenges pales in comparison to real-world struggles.


Reality increasingly dominates the story; in fact, the faun’s realm can seem merely the stage for a series of set-pieces whose grotesque and detailed design impresses more than any sense of momentum or high stakes. Yet as escapist fantasies go, this supernatural is markedly muddy – both literally, as when Ofelia ventures into the belly of a great tree, and in the general creepiness that marks even those ostensibly sympathetic to her, like the faun, with its unnerving habit of appearing in her bedroom.


The labyrinth has echoes of authentic atrocity: a pile of children’s shoes lies ominously near the banqueting table of a bald-bodied, blank-faced baby-eater. At least as evident, though, is del Toro’s own immersion in fantasy and horror cinema, with nods to ‘Don’t Look Now’, ‘Rosemary’s Baby’ and ‘The Shining’ among others (not to mention Goya and ‘The Spirit of the Beehive’). It’s as a filmmaker, rather than storyteller, that del Toro is most successful here: a disjunction remains between the story’s childlike form and its gruesome execution, but few directors are so adept at conveying both the uncanny in the real and the recognisable in the fantastic.Ben Walters


Source : Time Out London Issue 1892: November 21-28 2006

Trailer:
 
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