Showing posts with label Gabriel García Márquez. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gabriel García Márquez. Show all posts

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Friday, June 13, 2014

#FridayReads: Land of Love and Drowning by Tiphanie Yanique

A major debut from an award-winning writer—an epic family saga set against the magic and the rhythms of the Virgin Islands.

In the early 1900s, the Virgin Islands are transferred from Danish to American rule, and an important ship sinks into the Caribbean Sea. Orphaned by the shipwreck are two sisters and their half brother, now faced with an uncertain identity and future. Each of them is unusually beautiful, and each is in possession of a particular magic that will either sink or save them.

Chronicling three generations of an island family from 1916 to the 1970s, Land of Love and Drowning is a novel of love and magic, set against the emergence of Saint Thomas into the modern world. Uniquely imagined, with echoes of Toni Morrison, Gabriel García Márquez, and the author’s own Caribbean family history, the story is told in a language and rhythm that evoke an entire world and way of life and love. Following the Bradshaw family through sixty years of fathers and daughters, mothers and sons, love affairs, curses, magical gifts, loyalties, births, deaths, and triumphs, Land of Love and Drowning is a gorgeous, vibrant debut by an exciting, prizewinning young writer.

Tiphanie Yanique is from Saint Thomas, Virgin Islands. The author of the story collection How to Escape from a Leper Colony, she is a 2010 Rona Jaffe Writers’ Award winner and was named by the National Book Awards as one of 2011’s “5 Under 35.”  She teaches at the New School and lives in Brooklyn and Saint Thomas

Friday, June 06, 2014

#FridayReads: Faces in the Crowd By: Valeria Luiselli

About Faces in the Crowd By: Valeria Luiselli
A multi-layered story told by two narrators: a 21st-century Emily Dickinson living in Mexico City who relates to the world vicariously through her children and a past that both overwhelms and liberates her, and a dying poet living in a run-down apartment in Philadelphia in the 1950s. 
While she tells the story of her past as a young editor in New York City desperately trying to convince a publisher to translate and publish the works of Gilberto Owen-an obscure Mexican poet who lived in Harlem during the 1920s and whose ghostly presence constantly haunts her in the subway-she also relates the slow but inevitable disintegration of her present family life.
Luiselli's novel stands apart from most Latin American fiction. She avoids worn-out narratives about drug wars and violence, and her downbeat supernaturalism feels quite different from the magical realism of Gabriel García Márquez. Concerned, above all, with literature's ability to transcend time and space, Faces in the Crowd signals the appearance of an exciting female voice to join a new wave of Latino writers. Via The Guardian

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

A Literary Guide to National Hispanic Heritage Month

The kind folks at Open Road Media sent this great infographic over  guide you through the plethora of great reads, highlighting top picks in fiction, memoir, children’s, mystery, and more. spotlighting literature and stories that explore Hispanic themes. Don’t know where to begin?

"Gabriel García Márquez. Frida Kahlo. Christopher Columbus. Pablo Picasso. These are just a few of the countless men and women that have inspired and shaped American art, culture, and politics. Like their forbearers, Hispanic and Latino Americans continue to contribute to the rich fabric of the United States in innumerable ways, from the literature of Isabelle Allende to the music of Carlos Santana."


































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Saturday, April 27, 2013

Lit Links & Scoops


- Isabel Allende: By the Book: The author of the forthcoming novel “Maya’s Notebook” says reading Gabriel García Márquez made her want to become a writer: “I thought, ‘If this guy can do it, so can I.’ ”

Emilio Gil on Modern Spanish Book Design

- Lulu Delacre, Bilingual Children’s Book Author & Illustrator Says, “The Power is in Numbers

Top 20 Spanish-Language Novels Written Since 1982, (written in 2007)

- What librarians consider when putting together a Spanish-language children’s book collection

- If you have not see the documentary, The Central Park Five, you must watch it. It's online and in Spanish.


Thursday, September 20, 2012

Free Access to Research on Five Historic Hispanic Authors This Month

In honor of Hispanic heritage monthQuestia, an online research and paper-writing tool for students, is paying homage to Hispanic authors who have made significant contributions to literature throughout history.  For the entire month, enjoy free access to reference works on five of history’s most researched Hispanic authors:

  • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra:  Spanish-born Cervantes is widely regarded as an influential playwright, novelist and poet in history, penning infamous works such as Don Quixote during his lifetime.  As a student under the direction of Juan Lopez de Hoyos, Cervantes published his first works, a collection of four poems.  For a portion of his life, Cervantes lived a military-lifestyle, eventually being held prisoner in Algiers for many years.  Upon his release from captivity, Cervantes solidified his reputation as an author and authored many more novels.  [Mancing, Howard.  The Cervantes Encyclopedia, Vol. 1 A-K.  Greenwood Press: 2004]
  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez:  Marquez is among the most recognized Spanish American authors of the 20th Century and is primarily associated with his novel One Hundred Years of Solitude.  At the age of 12, the Colombian-born Marquez obtained a scholarship to study at Colegio Nacional, a national secondary school, and eventually went on to study law.  While working as a journalist for a newspaper, Marquez began to publish his first works, many of which were short stories.  As his works gained notoriety throughout his life, Marquez found fame and came to make many famous and powerful friends.  [Pelayo, Ruben.  Gabriel Garcia Marquez: A Critical Companion.  Greenwood Press: 2001]
Federico García Lorca
 Federico García Lorca
  • Federico Garcia Lorca:  Internationally recognized as a poet and playwright, Lorca’s tumultuous personal life and anguish was visible in many of his works.  Born in Spain, Lorca collaborated with many artists throughout Spain on various plays.  However, strained relationships with friends such as Salvador Dali led Lorca to make his way over to theUnited States where he enrolled at Colombia University and authored the poem Poet in New York.  Lorca eventually returned to Spain and was murdered in the Spanish Civil War. [Nandorfy, Martha J.  The Poetics of Apocalypse:  Federico Garcia Lorca’s Poet in New York.  Bucknell University Press: 2003]
  • Pablo Neruda:  Born as Ricardo Eliecer Neftali Reyes Basoalto in Chile, he often used the pen name Pablo Neruda for his politically-charged prose and poems and eventually took the alias as his legal name.  Throughout his life, Neruda became an internationally recognized figure for his involvement in politics, however in his youth he authored many poems such as the erotically-fueled Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair.  [Belitt, Ben.  The Forged Feature: Towards a Poetics of Uncertainty: New and Selected Essays.  Fordham University Press: 1995]
  • Jorge Luis Borges:  An Argentinean poet and short-story writer, Borges was a master of the written word with his writing first beginning in Europe where he received a baccalaureat from the College de Geneve in Switzerland.  In hisAutobiographical Essay Borges reminisces about how his involvement in literary tertulia while living in Madrid and how participating in conversations about different essays became a pivotal point within his writing career.  Borges is most remembered for his poetry and fictional essays that contained fantasy and magical realism themes.  [De Quevedo, Francisco.  Six Masters of the Spanish Sonnet: Essays and Translations.  Southern Illinois University Press: 1997]
 
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