Showing posts with label Education. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Education. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 01, 2014

L’Artiste who painted herself

The discipline of creation, be it to paint, compose, write, is an effort towards wholeness.” 
― Madeleine L'Engle

I've always wished I could draw, paint, sketch... Ever since Bob Ross' The Joy of Painting gentle voice urged us on, Simon in the Land of Chalk Drawings took us on his adventures and  Commander Mark in the Secret City shared all his secrets,  it's always been one of those things "I would one day get to."

A few weeks ago, I finally decided to give it a go and bought a ton of watercolor and oil paints, a few canvases and a ton of brushes.

My first one was going to be a horizon on the water but it turned out to be Amapolas (Poppies) and so my second go, I did the horizon. They're not stunning masterpieces but I cannot tell you how very still I felt my mind go while I was working on them.



Wednesday, October 09, 2013

Author & Educator, Jose Vilson, on Fatherhood

I recently asked fellow blogger, Jose Vilson (@TheJLV), his thoughts on Machismo, Fatherhood and the how the transition into becoming a "family man" changes you as person.

Here's Jose in his words:

Fatherhood isn't just a badge or something that happens when our children are born. It's a way of life. 

When my child was first born, and he shook the room with his first cries, I knew I was in for an awesome life-long journey. Within the first few days, he already peed on me, vomited on me, and pooped on me, which was a lesson in humility. It's as if a divine spirit said, "The things you thought would normally offend you are a natural part of your baby's growth. Love him anyways." So I did, and then some. Within the first few months, you're inundated with sleepless nights, diaper changes, and multiple places for your baby's sleep, including the couch, your bed, his bed, your leg, your chest, and anywhere else that the baby deems soft.

The Vilson Family (Courtesy of Jose Vilson)
When people say, "Everything changes," and it's absolutely true. I push myself harder to do right in everything I do because I have a child now, and the stakes are higher. Having a child means my schedule revolve around my son now. Gone are the days of spontaneous happy hours and movie premieres. Yet, I'm glad I gave it up for the running around, the laughter, and Mickey Mouse Clubhouse viewings. I find myself doing Dora the Explorer impressions because my son thinks it's funny.

The thing I've noticed with my fatherhood is that I didn't have my father growing up too much. I saw him on average once a year. While I've come to peace with his role in my life, I also know I wanted to do better. Being there for my son, even when I have to handle other responsibilities, is priority #1. He doesn't have too many words in his vocabulary, but making sure he knows I love him. He has lots to learn, and I'll be there for those lessons.

He has a great mother, and I appreciate the way she loves and cares for him. What I needed to do is create a new fatherhood, one that I hadn't seen before, and that would match what she was trying to do and then some.  It's a beautiful thing and I'd never turn back the clock on any of this experience.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jose Vilson is a math educator, writer, and activist in a New York City public school. You can find more of his writing at thejosevilson.com and his book, This Is Not A Test, will be released in the spring of 2014.

José Vilson writes about race, class, and education through stories from the classroom and researched essays. His rise from rookie math teacher to prominent teacher leader takes a twist when he takes on education reform through his now-blocked eponymous blog, TheJoseVilson.com. He calls for the reclaiming of the education profession while seeking social justice.

Tuesday, July 03, 2012

Which Book Should I Read This Summer? A Flowchart



via Teach.com

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Digital Natives, Pedagogy & Blogging

I'd like to invite all of my readers, especially the educators in the audience to welcome and follow my sister, Ms. Garcia, who is now blogging at Pre-K, My Way.



I'd also like to bring your attention to a very cool book called Teaching Digital Natives: Partnering for Real Learning from "Marc Prensky, who first coined the terms "digital natives" and "digital immigrants,"" as he "presents an intuitive yet highly innovative and field-tested partnership model that promotes 21st-century student learning through technology."

Thursday, January 11, 2007

Is Herman Badillo Right, Do We Not Value Education?

So everyone is taking about Herman Badillo's book, One Nation, One Standard: An Ex-Liberal on How Hispanics Can Succeed Just Like Other Immigrant Groups. In fact a lot of brouhaha is stirring, which will surely sell him a lot of books and also open up a much needed discourse on education. I wanted to bring up the topic here to address a couple of points but also see what your thoughts were on the book and the issues.


From the Baltimore Sun:



Mr. Badillo, 77, the first native-born Puerto Rican elected to Congress, is
being criticized for writing in his new book, One Nation, One Standard, that too
many of his fellow Hispanic-Americans are stuck in poverty because they don't
value education.


"Education is not a high priority in the Hispanic community," wrote Mr. Badillo.

"Hispanic parents rarely get involved with their children's schools. They seldom attend parent-teacher conferences, ensure that children do their homework or inspire their children to dream of attending
college."

Unfortunately, Mr. Badillo is right, and not only about Hispanics.
Indifference to education is unfortunately epidemic across racial and ethnic
lines, and it is particularly damaging to the poor. For earlier waves of
immigrants to America, unskilled jobs were much more plentiful. Upward mobility
for most of today's kids requires at least a couple of years of schooling beyond
high school.

Yet instead of discussing the points Mr. Badillo raises, many will try
to shout him down. Bronx Democratic leader Jose Rivera has blasted Mr. Badillo
in a New York Post interview as being a "total insult" to Latino parents. That's
OK, Mr. Badillo says. He wanted to stir up a dialogue. The controversy will help
him sell a few more books too. Puerto Ricans certainly are not the only
Americans who need to read it.


Read the entire article here:



I agree that in my experience many parents in the Puerto Rican community do not focus on their children's education. In fact, having grown up in Spanish Harlem in very close proximity to the Jewish community around the upper east side I have admired the cultural importance that they place on education and the arts.

I haven't read the book and was infuriated to read that in discussing the book the Wall Street Journal referred to Badillo as an immigrant -Newsflash: Puerto Ricans are US Citizens, whether they live in the States or the Island. The ones who have migrated to the mainland are emigrants. You would think that a journalist would know better.


But maybe Badillo did it to himself because his title implies that ALL Hispanics are immigrants, which isn't always true.


What do you all think about the issue?
 
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