Showing posts with label Brazil. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Brazil. Show all posts

Friday, March 20, 2015

#FridayReads: The End of the Rainy Season: Discovering My Family's Hidden Past in Brazil by Marian Lindberg

The End of the Rainy Season: Discovering My Family's Hidden Past in Brazil by Marian Lindberg:

Marian Lindberg grew up being told that Walter Lindberg, the man who raised her father, was a brave explorer who had been murdered in the Amazon. She took her father's claims at face value, basking in her exotic roots, until she started to notice things. The unverified legend became a riddle she couldn't solve.

As Lindberg moved from journalism to law, fell in love, and sought a family of her own, her father repeatedly interfered. He had a closed vision of his family, and she-unlike the silent Walter-was breaking out.

Yet her father's story of the past haunted Lindberg. Long after her father's death, Lindberg set off for the Amazon, determined to find out the truth about Walter. Aided by generous Brazilians who adopted her search as if it were their own, she discovered as much about herself and her family as about Walter, whose true role in Brazil's history turned out to be unexpected and deeply troubling.

Sharply observant, wrought with honesty, and sweeping in its ambitions, The End of the Rainy Season is a powerful examination of identity and human relationships with nature, and between one another.



A lawyer and photographer as well as a writer, Marian E. Lindberg works in New York as Senior Staff Writer for The Nature Conservancy, an international environmental organization with programs throughout the United States and in over thirty countries, including Brazil, where much of The End of the Rainy Season takes place. Lindberg has lived in eastern Long Island with her son since 2005. She enjoys music and outdoor activities and has traveled extensively.

Friday, April 11, 2014

#FridayReads: With My Dog Eyes by Hilda Hilst

Book list material:

A short, stunning book by a Brazilian master of the avant-garde.

Something has changed in Amos Keres, a university mathematics professor—his sentences trail off in class, he is disgusted by the sight of his wife and son, and he longs to flee the comfortable bourgeois life he finds himself a part of. Most difficult of all are his struggles to express what has happened to him, for a man more accustomed to numbers than words. He calls it "the clearcut unhoped-for," and it's a vision that will drive him to madness and, eventually, death. 

Written in a fragmented style that echoes the character's increasingly fragile hold on reality, With My Dog-Eyes is intensely vivid, summoning up Amos's childhood and young adulthood—when, like Richard Feynman, he used to bring his math books to brothels to study—and his life at the university, with its "meetings, asskissers, pointless rivalries, gratuitous resentments, jealous talk, meglomanias." 

Hilst, whose father was diagnosed with paranoid schizophrenia, has created a lacerating, and yet oddly hopeful, portrayal of a descent into hell--Amos never makes sense of the new way he sees things, but he does find an avenue of escape, retreating to his mother's house and, farther, towards the animal world. A deeply metaphysical, formally radical one-of-a-kind book from a great Brazilian writer.

HILDA HILST was born in 1930 in Jaú, Brazil. Hilst was a prolific author whose work spans many different genres, including poetry, fiction, drama and newspaper columns. Born the heiress to a coffee fortune, she abandoned Sao Paolo and promising law career in the 1960s, moved to the countryside, and built herself a house, Casa do Sol, where she lived until the end of her life with a rotating cast of friends, lovers, aspiring artists, bohemian poets, and dozens of dogs. She received many major literary prizes over the course of her career, including Brazil's highest honor, the Premio Jabuti. Her work has been translated into French, German, and Italian. She died in 2004, at the age of 73. 

ADAM MORRIS is a PhD candidate in Latin American literature at Stanford University.  An excerpt from his translation of With My Dog-Eyes won the 2012 Susan Sontag Foundation Prize for Literary Translation.

Friday, February 07, 2014

#FridayReads: Quesadillas by Juan Pablo Villalobos

Add this to your book list, Quesadillas by Juan Pablo Villalobos:

It’s the 1980s in Lagos de Moreno—a town where there are more cows than people, and more priests than cows—and a poor family struggles to overcome the bizarre dangers of living in Mexico. The father, a high-school civics teacher, insists on practicing and teaching the art of the insult, while the mother prepares hundreds of quesadillas to serve to their numerous progeny: Aristotle, Orestes, Archilochus, Callimachus, Electra, Castor, and Pollux. Confined to their home, the family bears witness to the revolt against the Institutional Revolutionary Party and their umpteenth electoral fraud. This political upheaval is only the beginning of Orestes’s adventures and his uproarious crusade against the boredom of rustic life and the tyranny of his older brother.

     Both profoundly moving and wildly funny, Juan Pablo Villalobos’s Quesadillas is a satiric masterpiece, chock-full of inseminated cows, Polish immigrants, religious pilgrims, alien spacecraft, psychedelic watermelons, and many, many "your mama" insults.

Juan Pablo Villalobos was born in Guadalajara, Mexico, in 1973, and lives in Brazil, where he writes for various publications and teaches courses in Spanish literature. He has written literary criticism, film criticism, and short stories. Villalobos is the author of Down the Rabbit Hole (FSG, 2012), which has been translated into fifteen languages.

Friday, December 06, 2013

#FridayReads: An Afro-Latina Book List

Inspired by Melissa Harris-Perry's black feminism syllabus over at Feministing I've put together a version geared toward the specific experiences of being both black and Hispanic in the U.S.A and beyond.


  1. Afro-Latin America, 1800-2000 by George Reid Andrews 
  2. Daughters of the Stone: A Novel by Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa  
  3. Afro-Latino Voices: Narratives from the Early Modern Ibero-Atlantic World, 1550-1812 by Kathryn Joy McKnight 
  4. The Afro-Latin@ Reader: History and Culture in the United States by Miriam Jiménez Román 
  5. Women Warriors of the Afro-Latina Diaspora by Marta Moreno Vega
  6. Black in Latin America by Henry Louis Gates Jr. 
  7. The African Presence in Santo Domingo by Carlos Andujar 
  8. Latining America: Black-Brown Passages and the Coloring of Latino/a Studies by Claudia Milian  
  9. Unbecoming Blackness: The Diaspora Cultures of Afro-Cuban America by Antonio Lopez 
  10. The African Experience in Spanish America by Leslie B., Jr. Rout 
  11. Race in Another America: The Significance of Skin Color in Brazil by Edward E. Telles 
  12. Reyita: The Life of a Black Cuban Woman in the Twentieth Century by Maria De Los Reyes Castillo Bueno, Daisy Rubiera Castillo, Anne McLean 
  13. Autobiography of a Slave Autobiografia de un esclavo by Juan Francisco 
  14. Down These Mean Streets by Piri Thomas
  15. The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz 
  16. Black Skin, White Masks by Frantz Fanon and Richard Philcox
  17. Women Writing Resistance: Essays on Latin America and the Caribbean by Jennifer Browdy de Hernandez, Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat and Michelle Cliff
  18. Island Beneath the Sea: A Novel by Isabel Allende
  19. Negras in Brazil: Re-envisioning Black Women, Citizenship, and the Politics of Identity by Professor Kia Lilly Caldwell 
  20. Racial Politics in Post-Revolutionary Cuba by Mark Q. Sawyer
  21. Blacks and Blackness in Central America: Between Race and Place Paperback by Lowell Gudmundson, Justin Wolfe  
  22. Blackness and Race Mixture: The Dynamics of Racial Identity in Colombia by Peter Wade 
  23. Yo Soy Negro: Blackness in Peru by Tanya Maria Golash-Boza 
  24. Freedoms Given, Freedoms Won: Afro-Brazilians in Post-Abolition SÏ€o Paolo and Salvador by Kim D. Butler
  25. Race and Ethnicity in Latin America by Peter Wade
  26. Black behind the Ears: Dominican Racial Identity from Museums to Beauty Shops by Ginetta E. B. Candelario
  27. Black and Green: Afro-Colombians, Development, and Nature in the Pacific Lowlands by Kiran Asher
  28. Land of the Cosmic Race: Race Mixture, Racism, and Blackness in Mexico by Christina A. Sue
  29. Black Mexico: Race and Society from Colonial to Modern Times by Ben Vinson 
  30. Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America by Eduardo Bonilla-Silva
  31. Yemoja: Gender, Sexuality, and Creativity in the Latina by Solimar Otero, Toyin Falola 
  32. Neither Enemies nor Friends: Latinos, Blacks, Afro-Latinos by Anani Dzidzienyo
  33. Afrodescendants, Identity, and the Struggle for Development in the Americas by Bernd Reiter
  34. Mulattas and Mestizas: Representing Mixed Identities in the Americas, 1850-2000 by Suzanne Bost
What would you add? Let me know especially fiction and literature...



Thursday, August 23, 2012

Forbes' 100 Most Powerful Women List: The Latinas

Yesterday Forbes announced its 9th annual ranking of the World’s 100 Most Powerful Women. You can see the whole list here, www.forbes.com/power-women.


Members of the 2012 ranking represent women in technology (a new category this year), politics, business, media, entertainment,  non-profits, as well as billionaires – all ranked by money, media presence and impact.   

The women represent 28 countries, have an average age of 55, and a combined 90 million Twitter followers.   

“This year’s Power Women exert influence in very different ways, and to very different ends, and all with very different impacts on the global community,” said Moira Forbes, President & Publisher, ForbesWoman. “

Whether leading multi-billion-dollar companies, governing countries, shaping the cultural fabric of our lives, or spearheading humanitarian initiatives, collectively these women are changing the planet in profoundly powerful and dynamic ways.


Below are the Latinas on the list:

  • Dilma Rosseff (No. 3) – President, Brazil
  • Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner (No. 16) – President, Argentina
  • Maria das Gracas Silva Foster (No. 20) – CEO, Petrobras, Brazil
  • Jennifer Lopez (No. 38), Entertainer, Entrepreneur, U.S./Puerto Rico   
  • Shakira Mebarak (No. 40) – Entertainer, Philanthropist, Columbia
  • Rosalia Mera (No. 54) – Billionaire Philanthropist, Spain
  • Sofia Vergara (No. 75) – Actress, Entrenpreneur Colombia 
  • Giselle Bündchen (No. 83) – Supermodel, Ambassador, UN Environmental Program, Brazil



Friday, August 10, 2012

Lit links & Scoops

Where I collect and share all the interesting random things I've read all week:

- The Slave Who Circumnavigated The World via The Awl

- Brazilian author Clarah Averbuck on why she wrote Cat Life: ""Unfortunately, Brazil is still a very sexist country. Girls are still seen like objects. The most important thing a woman can do is just be pretty, and it's a shame," she says." via NPR

- See Also: “I’m like, ‘I just made history and people are focused on my hair?’” Gabby Douglas rocks.

- Love: A Booklover’s Map of Literary Geography circa 1933 via BrainPickings

- Oddballs: People Without Facebook Accounts Are 'Suspicious.' on Forbes

- Stress-Free: Recipe for 1x/week Cleansing/Detox Bath Soak via Whole Living

- 7 Foods a Nutritionist Would Never Eat via Shape

- THE SEARCH FOR THE NEXT SRIRACHA - How To Make Sofrito, The DIY Condiment brought to you by The Awl

- Holy bat babies - Cuteness!

- Why dating artists is a terrible idea: I INSPIRED A "BAD" VERSION OF MYSELF ON AARON SORKIN'S "THE NEWSROOM" via xoJane.

- And now you know: How Advertisers Convinced Americans They Smelled Bad: A schoolgirl and a former traveling Bible salesman helped turn deodorants and antiperspirants from niche toiletries into an $18 billion industry via Smithsonian

- Colson Whitehead's novel Zone One is a post-apocalyptic tale of a Manhattan crippled by a plague and overrun with zombies. He explains that he created the novel, in part, to pay homage to the grimy 1970s New York of his childhood. at NPR

- Also How to Write By COLSON WHITEHEAD - awesomeness via NYTimes.

- The Daily Chicana on Remembering My Brown-Skinned Dolls via Racialicious

- Chinese/Jamaican Poet StacyAnn Chin talks about being a single mother, in-vitro fertilization,and how her decision to have a child was met by the Black and LGBT community. Read more at Mater Mea.

- Read MOLLY RINGWALD's story about Infidelity here

- This October, Designers & Books are hosting the first-ever book fair in New York City to focus on architecture and design book publishing. Go here.

- Amazing #1: Site tells you what an awesome social media early adopter you are via ShinyShiny
- Amazing #2: AMAZON: We now buy more Kindle eBooks than printed books Here.

- Style, yes please: 20 fashion-focused Pinterest accounts via Mashable.

- Nicely done: A gender free toy store -Harrods Department Store via The Mary Sue

- The PlayTales App Teaches Your Kids To Love Books With Interactive Kids Stories via MakeUseof

- I cannot wait to go to the Netherlands this fall: AMSTERDAM CITY GUIDE: WHY I LOVE AMSTERDAM, THE GREATEST LITTLE CITY IN WORLD via MeltingButter.

Sunday, July 26, 2009

Welcome Guest Blogger: Laurie Sandell

Cover of "The Impostor's Daughter: A True...
Cover of The Impostor's Daughter: A True Memoir
Hi Literanista readers,

Thanks so much for inviting me to guest blog.




My name is Laurie Sandell and I'm the author of The Impostor's Daughter: A True Memoir, The story is about growing up with my larger-than-life Argentine father, and slowly coming to realize that everything he'd told my family was a lie.



I think because my father was such a fantastic storyteller, everything he said--no matter how wild the tale--felt like the truth. I felt like the luckiest kid in the world when my father visited my sixth grade class and told them stories about smuggling horses through the jungles of Brazil, and escaping from an Argentine prison and swimming across the River Paranar, and catching a grenade in his helmet and tossing it back to its sender in Vietnam.



When I was in high school, he told me tales of his friendship with Pope John Paul II, and how he'd parachuted into the jungle with General Westmoreland, and had written position papers for Henry Kissinger. And again, I was in awe.



Years later, when I became a celebrity interviewer for Glamour magazine--sitting across from the likes of Sarah Jessica Parker, and J. Lo, and Halle Berry--I felt the same feeling of excitement I'd felt in the presence of my "original celebrity," my father. So when it all fell apart and I realized his stories were nothing more than that--stories--I had to rebuild my own sense of identity from scratch.



It's interesting, when you have an immigrant parent, because identity is already such a strong and yet malleable thing: My father took enormous pride in his American citizenship, yet he was never really "of" America. He retained the strong accent of his youth.



He was brilliant, yet unable to rise through the ranks professionally (or legally). And yet no matter the adversity he faced, he felt, staunchly, that he was living in the greatest country in the world, where anything was possible. I sometimes reflect on the fact that much of the success I've had comes from lessons I've learned from my father--some directly, some in spite of what he taught me.



I hope you enjoy the book, and feel free to e-mail me with any comments or questions--I'd love to hear your feedback!

All the best,

Laurie

www.lauriesandell.com

Monday, July 09, 2007

Brazil, Peru & Mexico Made the Wonders of the World List

Brazil’s Christ the Redeemer (statue), , Peru’s Machu Picchu, and Mexico’s Chichen-Itza are now among the new 7 Wonders of the World! Sweet.

See the whole list here:

 
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