Showing posts with label Author. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Author. Show all posts

Saturday, April 27, 2013

Lit Links & Scoops


- Isabel Allende: By the Book: The author of the forthcoming novel “Maya’s Notebook” says reading Gabriel García Márquez made her want to become a writer: “I thought, ‘If this guy can do it, so can I.’ ”

Emilio Gil on Modern Spanish Book Design

- Lulu Delacre, Bilingual Children’s Book Author & Illustrator Says, “The Power is in Numbers

Top 20 Spanish-Language Novels Written Since 1982, (written in 2007)

- What librarians consider when putting together a Spanish-language children’s book collection

- If you have not see the documentary, The Central Park Five, you must watch it. It's online and in Spanish.


Thursday, January 24, 2013

New Book: Alejandro Zambra’s Ways of Going Home

Español: Mapa de la comuna de Santiago, en San...
Mapa de la comuna de Santiago, en Santiago de Chile (Photo : Wikipedia)
Out this month,"Alejandro Zambra’s Ways of Going Home begins with an earthquake, seen through the eyes of an unnamed nine-year-old boy who lives in an undistinguished middleclass housing development in a suburb of Santiago, Chile

When the neighbors camp out overnight, the protagonist gets his first glimpse of Claudia, an older girl who asks him to spy on her uncle Raúl.

In the second section, the protagonist is the writer of the story begun in the first section. His father is a man of few words who claims to be apolitical but who quietly sympathized—to what degree, the author isn’t sure—with the Pinochet regime

His reflections on the progress of the novel and on his own life—which is strikingly similar to the life of his novel’s protagonist—expose the raw suture of fiction and reality.

Ways of Going Home switches between author and character, past and present, reflecting with melancholy and rage on the history of a nation and on a generation born too late—the generation which, as the author-narrator puts it, learned to read and write while their parents became accomplices or victims. It is the most personal novel to date from Zambra, the most important Chilean author since Roberto Bolaño."

Sunday, November 18, 2012

Reflections on NaNoWriMo

I've been sitting on several chapters of my unpublished, unfinished novel for years now. It's been so long that I've had to transfer the lengthy file to a new computer every couple of years to assure it's safety.

I was envision this, from here
Two months ago, I moved to a larger apartment where I now have my very own study/boudoir, which serves as my library and dressing room. My boyfriend jokingly refers to it as my "Lady Room" the foil to his "Man Cave."

Before I moved in, I had visions of hours-long writing stints surrounded my by art, books, and lovely things but in reality, I've had little time to spend in there at all. It came to me that perhaps the best bet to finish my book would be during a pregnancy - giving birth in more ways than one.

It's gotten to the point where I now have THREE great ideas for a book: one fictional and two, nonfiction. The latter two are no more than aspirational concepts and sometimes I wonder if I should just go ahead and query an agent now and worry about completing all three later but then I reign myself in. I want or need the timing, no, everything to be right because I know each one will be a success.

This is an outline J.K Rowling used while writing.
Since it's National Novel Writing Month, I've seen a lot recently on getting that book finished or published. Some of the articles like this one on how to use an Excel Spreadsheet to outline your novel  or Designing your story with the use of a snowflake fractal, I'll be quite honest, simply turn my stomach.

Is that really the best way to write a book? Is there a recipe, blueprint, secret sauce to doing this and doing it repeatedly? I remember reading this article on James Patterson's formula and thinking, well, that's one way to do it.

I've gotten in the (very bad) habit of just being in the mercy of my muse. When she beckons I follow, for hours if need be and when she doesn't, I let her be and I know that's probably not the best way to get where I want to go.

On a walk home recently, I thought to myself, wouldn't it be grand if I could write and publish a book every year for the rest of my life. I think back to the all the teachers and supporters who thought I would be a published author before I hit twenty sometimes and I feel as if I have failed in some way. I know I haven't but  we all deal with our little doubts and demons.

I know am not the only creative person out there with ideas and projects everywhere and no time to bring them into being. How do you deal with this sort of thing? Do you have any advice for me?


Thursday, February 26, 2009

Margarita Engle, first Latina recipient of the Newbery Award

Great interview:

Guanabee Interviews Margarita Engle, Newbery Award-Winning Author Of The Surrender Tree: Poems of Cuba’s Struggle for Freedom.

Margarita Engle is also the 2009 winner of the Pura Belpré Author Award, which honors Latino authors whose work best portrays, affirms and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in children’s books.
















Congrats, Margarita!

Thursday, December 21, 2006

Pa Que Lo Sepas!


How fantastic is this?


I just got my newsletter from Criticas (which I love reading & just had to share).


López Nieves Wins Puerto Rican Literature Award
By María Elena Cruz — December 15, 2006

The Institute of Puerto Rican Literature announced this month that López Nieves's novel El corazón de Voltaire (Voltaire's Heart) is the winner of the Premio Nacional de Literatura (National Literature Prize). This is the second time López Nieves has won this prize, and the first time a single author has been given this award twice. In 2000, he won the Premio Nacional de Literatura for La verdadera muerte de Juan Ponce de León (The true death of Juan Ponce de León), a collection of short stories. The prize consists of $6000.

"I really did not expected to win this award twice since it has never happened before," a surprised López Nieves told Críticas. "I feel like this novel has a life of its own." El corazón de Voltaire tells the story of Roland Luziers, a professor of genetics at the Sorbonne, and Dr. Ysabeau de Vassy, a historian, who set out to establish the authenticity of Voltaire's heart, which rests at Paris's Bibliotheque Nationale.

López Nieves is also the author of the historical novel Seva (Editorial Cordillera, 2003), and Escribir para Rafa (To Write for Rafa), a collection of short stories.



They also have a great feature on The Best Adult Books of 2006:
http://www.criticasmagazine.com/article/CA6401082.html
 
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