Sunday, June 30, 2013

Free eBook Download: Missing in Machu Picchu

Recently, Missing in Machu Picchu by Cecilia Velastegui won three awards at the International Latino Book Awards, including first place for Best Novel – Adventure or Drama. From June 24 through July 7, there is a free e-book download of Missing in Machu Picchu available book’s page on amazon.com.

Here's Cecilia Velastegui shared with Literanista:


Q: What inspired you to write the book?

Missing in Machu Picchu was a result of a confluence of events in my life: my fond memories of my indigenous nannies from the Andes, our family’s unusual practice of believing in the present-day proximity of our long-dead great-grandmother, my understanding of the clash between the Inca and the Spanish cultures in early colonial Peru and its aftermath, and my surreal experience hiking the Inca Trail.  

To this heady mix of Andean lore, I wanted to introduce a generation of readers used to online dating, vampires, and angels, to the real-life, present-day, presence of Andean mummies, and to the perils of online dating!  As a former marriage and family therapist, I looked at data and read frightning stories about online dating.   I commiserated with my friends’ experiences with online dating, and I took their disillusionment with online dating on a dark psychological journey on the Inca Trail, a geographical location where one is literally steps away from life and death.

My lifelong interest and research in Andean mythology and its pantheon made its way to the forefront of Missing in Machu Pichhu.  By mixing factual and real historical details, such as the methodical steps of an Andean shaman’s blessing, I wanted to bring the reader into the Andean world of yesterday and today. For many years, I’ve studied the 16th and 17th century Spanish Colonial chronicles of Cieza de Léon, Juan de Betanzos, and Garcilaso de la Vega.

Their observations of the ancient Andean practices were both alarming and informative. In Missing in Machu Picchu, I included the 17th century drawings of chronicler Guamán Poma de Ayala. I knew of the existence of many of his drawings, but the drawing of the procession of the mallqui, the mummy central to my novel, had me digging in my collection and in libraries for quite some time.

Q: What was the most interesting thing you realized during the writing process?

Without a doubt I realized how central love is to our lives.  The ancient Andean people could not let go of their departed ancestors, they loved them too much to ever forget them, and therefore, they kept their mummified bodies nearby.  Modern-day women search for a soul mate; they also want to experience an all-encompassing and eternal love.

Visit Ceciliavelastegui.com to learn more.


Thursday, June 27, 2013

Meatless Monday Recipes: Salmon & Red Snapper

Today I want to share two of my favorite pescatarian dishes for your Meatless Mondays.

The first is a Nut-Crusted Salmon, which I adapted from a recipe I found online:

Almond basic crust for salmon
Almond basic crust for salmon (Photo: Gudlyf)
Marinade:
1/2 cup white wine
1/4 cup lemon juice (you may add fresh -squeezed orange or grapefruit juice too)
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
1/2 teaspoon crushed oregano
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground pepper
4 (8 ounce) salmon fillets, skin on

 Crust:
1 cup finely chopped walnuts (you can substitute pine nuts or pecans, etc)
1 tablespoon chopped dill/cilantro
1 tablespoon chopped chives
2 tablespoons olive oil 2 tablespoons lemon juice

Mix marinade ingredients in a baking pan. Add salmon, turn to coat, and marinate for at least 30 minutes to an hour.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees

In a small bowl, mix walnuts, dill/cilantro, chives, olive oil, and lemon juice. Place on foil lined baking sheet, skin side up. Place in the broiler for 2 minutes until skin is seared and crispy. You can also grill. Remove and turn fish over and lightly brush with marinade. Sprinkle crust on top, skin side down. Bake for 4 to 8 minutes, or until the salmon is cooked to the desired doneness and the crust is golden.

***

The next recipe is Broiled Red Snapper adapted from Chef Daisy Martinez. Some people may be put off by serving a whole fish, head on but I promise you this dish will not only taste delish but will make you look like a pro.

Ingredients:
Two 1 ½-pound cleaned red snappers, left whole
Dry Adobo, homemade or store-bought
2 lemons, cut in half
Juice of  orange,
Mojito or Ajimojili for serving

Makes 4 servings

Sprinkle the fish inside and out very liberally with the adobo.
Line them up side by side in a baking dish large enough to hold them comfortably.
Squeeze the lemons over the inside and outside.
Cover and refrigerate the fish for up to an hour (longer and the lemon juice may start to cure the fish).

Broil the fish, turning once, until the meat along the backbone close to the head is opaque and firm, 15 to 20 minutes. The skin should be golden and crispy in spot. Serve whole.

To serve the fish, place whole on plate and top with aoili and lemon slices.

Monday, June 24, 2013

New Book: The Hare By César Aira

Mujer mapuche con joyas de plata, ca. 1890
Mujer mapuche con joyas de plata, ca. 1890 (Photo: Wikipedia)
Vintage engraving of Mapuche
Vintage engraving of Mapuche (Photo: Wikipedia)
Add this one to your list:

When a Mapuche chief suddenly goes missing, a British naturalist is asked to find him in the vast Argentine pampas

Clarke, a nineteenth-century English naturalist, roams the pampas in search of that most elusive and rare animal: the Legibrerian hare, whose defining quality seems to be its ability to fly. The local Indians, pointing skyward, report recent sightings of the hare but then ask Clarke to help them search for their missing chief as well. On further investigation Clarke finds more than meets the eye:in the Mapuche and Voroga languages every word has at least two meanings.

Witty, very ironic, and with all the usual Airian digressive magic, The Hare offers subtle reflections on love, Victorian-era colonialism, and the many ambiguities of language.

César Aira (b. 1949) was born in Coronel Pringles, Argentina, in 1949. He has published more than seventy books of fiction and essays.

Nick Caistor is a translator, editor, and author. He has written a biography of Octavio Paz and has translated the works of José Saramago, Paulo Coelho, and Julián Ríos, among others.


Friday, June 21, 2013

5 Classic Mexican Horror Films You Can Watch Online

I've been meaning to share this list here for almost a year now since writing about my uncle, the movie projectionist.

While researching Mexican films, for the Macario post, I came across a bounty of full length, black and white, scary movies that you can watch online. Perfect for a stormy movie night!

The very first Mexican horror movie was based in what is definitely Mexico's best known ghost story:1933's "La Llorona", the crying woman

 

"La Llorona" begins in modern day Mexico (in the 30s), at the birthday party of the son of Dr. Ricardo De Acuna (Ramón Pereda) and his wife Ana (Virginia Zurí). Everything is fun for the kids, but Ana and her father Don Fernando De Moncada (Paco Martínez) are worried about an ancient curse that hangs over their family, in which is stated that the first son of a Moncada will die horribly as a child, victim of "La Llorona". 

As a man of science, Ricardo doesn't believe in this, so Don Fernando begins to narrate the dark origins of the legend, beginning with the story of Ana Xicontencatl (Adriana Lamar), a noble princess of Aztec heritage who gets romantically involved with a womanizing Spaniard named Rodrigo De Cortéz (Alberto Martí) in the times of Colonial Mexico. However the Moncada curse goes beyond the years of Spanish rule over Mexico. via W-Cinema




The Hell of Frankenstein is an odd four-part TV mini series stitched together into the story of a mad scientist, who creates a remote-controlled monster and sends it to terrorize the city.




Mysteries of Black Magic: A stage magician, pitted against woman in peril; her lover is the hero. In a crypt, a woman and her assistant keep the revered body of their contemporary warlock-master whose sexual jealousy triggers the climax as the witch falls for the Hero and abducts him.



The Skeleton of Mrs. Morales is a 1960 Mexican black comedy film based on Arthur Machen's 1927 short story "The Islington Mystery". It is regarded by critics as one of the ten best Mexican films of all time. via Wikipedia



Macario is a 1960 Mexican supernatural drama film directed by Roberto Gavaldón and starring Ignacio López Tarso. It was the first Mexican film to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Film in a Foreign Language. The story centers on Macario, a poor indigenous woodcutter, during Colonial Mexico, who lives enraged for being so poor.It is based off of the story of brothers Grimm Godfather Death. via Wikipedia

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Recipe: Baked Macaroni & Cheese

Growing up in a Puerto Rican household, the only Macaroni & Cheese I was familiar with was Kraft Mac & Cheese from the box that my mom reluctantly served us when she had little other option. Even then she added a bit of Adobo seasoning, garlic powder, basil and oregano leaves to the bland neon orange mix. She usually served it with a juicy chuleta Pork Chop.

As I got older and more familiar with the Southern, Soul, baked version, I was floored by the amazing difference in creaminess and richness. When I began cooking on my own, the recipe below was my favorite. The hint of mustard makes this a wonderful, sophisticated version that will amaze all who consume it. I think it came from an old Saveur Magazine:

Southern-Style Macaroni and Cheese Baked Macaroni and Cheese

MAKES:4 to 6 servings
PREP: 15 minutes
COOK: 40 minutes

1 (8-ounce) package dried elbow macaroni or favorite pasta (about 2 1/4 cups,uncooked)
1/4 cup (4 tablespoons) butter
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
2 cups milk
1 tablespoon whole-grain Dijon mustard
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/4 teaspoon hot sauce
1 (8-ounce) package shredded sharp Cheddar cheese (about 2 cups)
2 tablespoons grated Parmigiano-Reggiano (optional)
Toppings (optional):
1/2 cup fresh breadcrumbs
2 tablespoons butter, melted

1. Preheat oven to 350°.
2. Cook macaroni according to package directions. Drain and set aside. Melt butter in a large heavy saucepan over low heat; add flour, stirring until smooth. Cook 3 to 5 minutes, stirring constantly. Turn heat to medium; gradually whisk in milk, and cook over medium heat, stirring or whisking constantly until thickened, about 10 minutes. Stir in pasta, mustard, and next 4 ingredients, stirring just until cheese begins to melt.
3. Pour pasta mixture into a lightly greased 13- x 9 inch baking dish. Sprinkle with Parmigiano-Reggiano or more Cheddar. If desired, top with fresh breadcrumbs, and drizzle evenly with melted butter.
4. Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 25 minutes or until bubbly and golden. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.

However, cut from the same cloth as my mother, I amended the recipe and made it my own, grating onions and garlic into it, adding a dash of Worcestershire and other herbs and spices. It's been years since I've made it though because it's a lot of work to make and also because of the carb and fat content.

Recently, I ran a contest and asked you all to tell me what you would like to see more of posted here and the general consensus was Italian and Latin recipes so I am sharing this one with everyone but I would like to amend it to show you how to make a healthier version.

Updated Baked Macaroni and Cheese Recipe - The healthier, Tastier version:

1 (8-ounce) package dried whole wheat pasta (about 2 1/4 cups, uncooked)
3 tablespoons Olive Oil
1/4 cup all-purpose flour
1 cup low fat or non fat Greek Yogurt
1 cup plain almond milk
1 tablespoon whole-grain organic Dijon mustard
1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
1/4 teaspoon Sriracha
1/4 Worcertershire
1/2 cup grated onion & garlic
1/2 cup chopped fresh basil and oregano
1 (8-ounce) shredded reduced fat sharp Cheddar cheese (about 2 cups)
2 tablespoons grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

1. Preheat oven to 350°.

2. Cook macaroni according to package directions. Drain and set aside.

Heat up olive oil in a large heavy saucepan over low heat; add onion, garlic, basil and oregano in a teeny bit of oil. Once the onions seem soft and have been sweated down, add flour, stirring until smooth. Cook 3 to 5 minutes, stirring constantly. This is a roux, the basic thickener in soups and sauces.

Turn heat to medium; gradually whisk in milk & yogurt, and cook over medium heat, stirring or whisking constantly until thickened, about 10 minutes. Add more oil or flour, if needed until you get the right thick consistency. Your arm will ache from stirring but you will get the satisfaction of knowing you just made a cheese sauce from scratch. Booyah! Stir in pasta, mustard, and rest of the ingredients, stirring just until cheese begins to melt.

3. Pour pasta mixture into a lightly greased (Use Canola or Olive Oil on a paper towel, not butter, to grease) 13- x 9 inch baking dish. Sprinkle with Parmigiano-Reggiano or more Cheddar.

4. Bake, uncovered, at 350° for 25 minutes or until bubbly and golden. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.

Enjoy!

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Vine: There is never enough

I love you, always. Time is nothing.” ― Audrey Niffenegger, The Time Traveler's Wife

 
* My first Vine attempt.

Tuesday, June 18, 2013

Monday, June 17, 2013

2013 Book List Pt II: What to Read this Summer

In case these 11 new reads weren't enough to last through the summer, here's a few more books you might definitely want to check out soon:

This Is Paradise: Stories by Kristiana Kahakauwila 
Elegant, brutal, and profound—this magnificent debut captures the grit and glory of modern Hawai'i with breathtaking force and accuracy.

Hydrant
(Photo: Zantony)
It's Not Love, It's Just Paris by Patricia Engel
Lita del Cielo, the daughter of two Colombian orphans who arrived in America with nothing and made a fortune with their Latin food empire, has been granted one year to pursue her studies in Paris before returning to work in the family business. She moves into a gently crumbling Left Bank mansion known as “The House of Stars,” where a spirited but bedridden Countess Séraphine rents out rooms to young women visiting Paris to work, study, and, unofficially, to find love.

Loteria: A Novel By Mario Alberto Zambrano 
In Lotería, the spellbinding literary debut by Mario Alberto Zambrano, a young girl tells the story of her family’s tragic demise using a deck of cards of the eponymous Latin American game of chance.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Fearless, gripping, at once darkly funny and tender, spanning three continents and numerous lives, Americanah is a richly told story set in today’s globalized world: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s most powerful and astonishing novel yet.

The Golem and the Jinni by Helene Wecker 
Marvelous and compulsively readable, Helene Wecker's debut novel The Golem and the Jinni weaves strands of Yiddish and Middle Eastern literature, historical fiction and magical fable, into a wondrously inventive and unforgettable tale.

Lexicon By Max Barry 
Sci-fi and Matrix fans will enjoy Max Barry’s most spellbinding and ambitious novel yet, Lexicon is a brilliant thriller that explores language, power, identity, and our capacity to love—whatever the cost.


Sunday, June 16, 2013

In the Mouth of the Whale

I grew up in New York City.

Recently, a partial memory of my early childhood came back to me of a enormous, stone whale, me playing within its gaping mouth and nearby water. I must have been perhaps four years old because I can only remember snippets and the thrill of being in that dark, cavernous creature's mouth while my mom sat nearby in the sun.

For some reason, I associate the memory with Central Park but I know the ins and outs of Central Park and many of the other city parks well, like the back of my hand. I have never been able to locate this place with the whale and the sprinklers/water works.

via http://vintagechromes.blogspot.com

This weekend sparked by a conversation about the memory, I did some research and then shared my findings with my mother who put it all together for me.

The whale was part of the Central Park Children's Zoo, the old Lehman one that was demolished in 1996, which was a 50th wedding anniversary tribute from the Senator and his wife. It featured  Jonah's Whale or Whaley, Noah's Ark, Hansel and Gretel's cottage and other storybook scenes. 

The interesting thing about this is that the "new" Central Park Zoo, opened in 1997, has been one of my all-time favorite places to go in the city since my college babysitting days and I've been there so many times and never realized this was the same place.


via The Central Park Zoo By Joan Scheier
Whaley (or Whalemina as she came to be called), decomposing, peeling and chipped by then was moved to Rockaway Beach in attempt to recuse her from the trash pit in the mid-1990s but was damaged during the trip - her jaw collapsed and her tail was lopped off. She was patched up and became a beloved beach mascot for another generation but ultimately, she was washed out to sea during Hurricane Sandy, last october and all that was recovered was her reattached tail.
Whalemina, Rockaway Beach
Whalemina, Rockaway Beach (Photo: gsz)

She lives on only in the memory of the brave children who traipsed inside her basin during the 1960s-1980s, and the ones who gazed upon her majestic mosaic in her Queens retreat. 

There is something beautiful, cyclical and constant about her return to Yemaya and the sea, once beached and now set free. 

When I spoke to my mother, she told me that she would often take me to Zoo after her physical therapy sessions at the hospital when she was young and sprite in spite of the devastating hit and run that changed the course of her life. That I loved to play the inside the cottage and peek out at her from the windows and from  the Ark and make friends with the other kids who frolicked in the mouth of the whale.

* Local Rockaway artists have vowed to resurrect Whalemina and rebuild the community, to learn more about the Projects of Peace and donate to help support their efforts click here.


Here's another whale you might also remember from the same era:

Friday, June 14, 2013

Lit Links and Scoops

Your weekly link pack:

To be, or not to be a Latino Author

- Mexico’s illiteracy problem is growing worse

- I'm sort of obsessed with Joss & Main, a home goods limited sale site.

- A list of the 2013 International Latino Book Awards Winners! via @mamiversebooks

- Racism on Twitter - yet again.

- Watcha Magazine is seeking advertiser. Be part of the 1st Latino Hip hop Magazine in the Nation! Shoot them an email at info@watchamag.com.

- Moms Turn to Tech to Get Kids Access to Latino Authors via ABC News

- Podcast: 200 Years of Latino History in Philadelphia" by WHYY Public Media via soundcloud

- "The idea that larger, traditional publishing houses—like Simon & Schuster, Alfred K. Knopf and
MacMillan—are passing over Hispanic authors, despite the quality of work and incredible niche in the book market, is disappointing." via Voxxi

- Great essay: the truth about multicultural stories via the Rumpus

- Have you joined this amazing group of Latina Bloggers yet? Join on Facebook.

- Very excited about Guillermo Del Toro's book, The Strain, coming to TV. Via Screenrant I also want to catch up on the BBC miniseries, In the Flesh, that I missed. iTunes, here I come.

- A fascinating map of the world’s most and least racially tolerant countries via Washington Post

- Great read: "The Truth About Bicultural Consumers and How Marketers Are Taking Notice Cultural Identity Is Crucial and Should Be Represented in Media" via AdAge.

- FX Courts Latinos (hard) for Crime Thriller 'The Bridge' - Early screenings, Q&As in bilingual media and a multicity mural project help boost awareness among a potential Hispanic viewership of 48 million. via Hollywood Reporter.

The Future Silicon Valley: Latina Coders via SV Latino

- Simón Bolívar: The Latin American Hero Many Americans Don’t Know via Time

- Am I an ‘Immigrant Writer’? By AMIT MAJMUDAR

Well done, Bacardi!


Check out these two new projects that need your help:

2013 indigogo Video from Renzo Devia / Creador Pictures on Vimeo.




Thursday, June 13, 2013

Invest in Afrolatinos: The Untaught Story

With your support, together we can bring the story of Afrolatinos to the world! Siempre Pa'lante!


2013 indigogo Video from Renzo Devia / Creador Pictures on Vimeo.

Learn more: http://www.afrolatinos.tv/ Also follow on Facebook, TwitterTumblr and Instagram. Conectate!

 

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Crush it en la Cocina! A Pilón/Molcajete Giveaway

I've always been fascinated by pilóns, the wooden mortar and pestles, so commonly used in Latin cuisine that I'm instantly taken to my mother's kitchen as she crushed garlic and oregano in a teeny bit of olive oil and salt to make her dishes like pernil or mofongo amazing.

In fact, I've started collecting my own array of these traditional tools sometimes made of ceramic, stone, metal or wood and used to crush, grind, and mash ingredients, medicines, herbs and seasonings. There is something so powerful about the act of grinding nature's bounty, almost like an alchemist, with your own two hands in a way that your ancestors have for thousands of years.

Italians used mortars and pestles since the 15th Century in apothecaries, the Molcajete or Mexican version dates back to over 6,000 years ago, Aztec and Maya cultures and is made literally of the earth, from volcanic rock. The Thais usage dates back to the 13th Century.

IMUSA, which specializes in Hispanic cookware and appliances, recently reached out to me about their line calderos (dutch oven pots), griddles & sauté pans, tostoneras, authentic molcajetes, empanada makers, tortilla warmers, salsa dishes and much more. They have some really great products that celebrate both the culture and cuisine of Latinos.

Honestly, some of these kitchen items are so cool and beautiful that they make perfect gifts. They have been kind enough to sponsor a giveaway for Literanista readers - more below on how to win one of three Lava Rock Molcajetes: Made from ultra-durable natural volcanic lava rock, this mortar and pestle set is large enough to grind up a party-size batch of guacamole, then mix and serve it in the same bowl. ($59.99 at Macy’s) Enter to win one below and help my blog gain more visitors:

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Guacamole and avocado are some of my favorites, just take a look at my Literanista Eats Pinterest Board to see what I mean but having these in your home makes so many healthy, fresh foods even a Mojito easy to make quickly.

Enjoy!

You might also like:
Latina Cooking: Healthy & Low Fat Versions
6 Books About Food Every Latina Should Read
Have You Tried Nueva Cocina Foods Yet?
New Book: Gran Cocina
Just Say "No" to MSG - DIY Recipes for Adobo, Sofrito & Sazon
Sonia Sotomayor's Favorite Dish

Monday, June 10, 2013

New Book: Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies & Q&A with Dr. Seth Holmes

I recently had an opportunity to interview Dr. Seth Holmes, an assistant professor of public health and medical anthropology at UC Berkeley, about his upcoming book Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies: Migrant Farmworkers in the United States.

Here's what Dr. Holmes told me:

Dr. Seth Holmes
I would say the most interesting finding from the field research, from my perspective, was how social inequalities and health inequalities come to be taken for granted in society and in health care.  For example, indigenous undocumented Mexican migrant farm workers live and work in very poor conditions and, as a result, have many related health problems.  

However, their living conditions, working conditions, and health are considered normal and natural by many people in society at large and in health care due to different framings of them as deserving these conditions.  Some of these framings relate to understandings of ethnic body differences, including people saying that indigenous Mexicans are perfect for picking strawberries "because they are lower to the ground", etc.  

Perhaps the most interesting part of the field work from a journalistic perspective would be the border crossing.  I accompanied several undocumented Mexican men as they trekked through the border desert from Mexico into the United States.  We were all apprehended by the border patrol, they were deported to Mexico and I was kept in border patrol jail for one day and then released with a fine for "entry without inspection."  During this experience, it became clear to me that the understanding of Mexican migrants as voluntarily choosing to cross the border was incorrect.  

My Mexican migrant companions experienced this crossing very much as something they were forced into by large social, economic, and political structures.  Thus, the common understandings of some migrants being voluntary versus forced does not hold up when it is considered in the context of the actual experience of the migrants most often categorized as voluntary.  

This is important because the understanding of their crossing as voluntary can often be used to blame them for the crossing (and sometimes even to blame them subtly for their death if they die trying to cross the desert).  

He received his PhD in Medical Anthropology from the University of California, Berkeley and San Francisco, and his M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco.

About Fresh Fruit, Broken Bodies:

This book is an ethnographic witness to the everyday lives and suffering of Mexican migrants. Based on 5 years of research in the field (including berry-picking and traveling with migrants back and forth from Oaxaca up the West Coast), Holmes, an anthropologist and MD in the mold of Paul Farmer and Didier Fassin, uncovers how market forces, anti-immigrant sentiment, and racism undermine health and health care. 

Holmes' material is visceral and powerful--for instance, he trekked with his informants illegally through the desert border into Arizona, where they were apprehended and jailed by the Border Patrol. After he was released from jail (and his companions were deported back to Mexico), Holmes interviewed Border Patrol agents, local residents and armed vigilantes in the borderlands. He lived with indigenous Mexican families in the mountains of Oaxaca and in farm labor camps in the United States, planted and harvested corn, picked strawberries, accompanied sick workers to clinics and hospitals, participated in healing rituals, and mourned at funerals for friends. The result is a 'thick description' that conveys the full measure of struggle, suffering and resilience of these farmworkers.

Friday, June 07, 2013

The New Extension of the Quantified Self: Your Quantified Pet

Two stories demonstrate how this trend is progressing:

How Technology Helped Track A Wandering Cat - WHEN CAROLINE PAUL’S KITTY REAPPEARED AFTER A LONG MONTH AWAY, SHE DECIDED TO FIGURE OUT WHERE HE HAD BEEN SPENDING HIS TIME. via Fast Company

Startup Whistle has designed an activity tracker that clips on to your dog’s collar, but its core offering is a cloud-based analytics service designed to quantify your pet’s health. via Giga Om

Now we won't need to wonder so much about what our pets are up to when we aren't looking.

Happy Friday!

 



 
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