Monday, October 22, 2012

New Book: Acting White? Rethinking Race in Post-Racial America

I don't know about the Post-Racial part but this one is for all the kids (like me) who've ever been called "coconut," "oreo," "apple" or "banana."


Acting White? : Rethinking Race in Post-Racial America

In Acting White, Devon Carbado and Mitu Gulati argue that racial judgments are often based not just on skin color, but on how a person conforms to behavior stereotypically associated with a certain race. Specifically, people judge racial minorities on how they "perform" their race. That includes the clothes they wear, how they style their hair, the institutions with which they affiliate, their racial politics, the people they befriend, date or marry, where they live, how they speak, and their outward mannerisms and demeanor. 


Employing these cues, decision-makers decide not simply whether a person is black but the degree to which she or he is so. Relying on numerous examples from the workplace, higher education, and police interactions, the authors demonstrate that, for African Americans, the costs of "acting black" are high. This creates pressures for blacks to "act white." 


But, as the authors point out, "acting white" has costs as well. Written in an easy style that is non-doctrinaire and provocative, the book makes complex concepts both accessible and interesting. Whether you agree and disagree with Acting White, the book will challenge your assumptions and make you think about racial prejudice from a fresh vantage point.


Devon Carbado is Associate Dean at the UCLA School of Law and Professor of Law and African American Studies. Mitiu Gulati is Professor of Law at Duke University.

Monday, October 15, 2012

Sign up: Hispanic Heritage Month Prize Pack Giveaway

Hispanic Heritage Month ends today but I encourage you to celebrate the contributions, leadership, and culture of Latinos everywhere throughout the year.

Please enter below to win 1 of 2 prize packages, which includes a For Greater Glory DVD, starring Peter O'Toole, Andy Garcia and Eva Longoria, a Safe House DVD, starring Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds, and an ARC of Count on Me: Tales of Sisterhoods and Fierce Friendships by Las Comadres Para Las Americas and Adriana V Lopez.

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Saturday, October 13, 2012

The Wanton Life


The Wanton Life, from My Nature is Hunger by Luis J. Rodriguez (Selected Poem)


About Luis J. Rodríguez:

Rodríguez is a poet, journalist, memoirist, children’s book writer, short story writer, and novelist whose documentation of urban and Mexican immigrant life has made him one of the most prominent modern Chicano literary voices. He is perhaps best known for his memoir Always Running (1993), a powerful account of his time spent in Los Angeles–area gangs in the 1960s and ’70s. One of Rodríguez’s primary concerns as a writer continues to be the experience of poor immigrants in US cities, a theme reflected in his novels and children’s books as well as first-person accounts.

Friday, October 12, 2012

Lit Links & Scoops

English: Black Hispanic and Latino Americans
Black Hispanic and Latino Americans (Photo: Wikipedia)
- 10 Essential Books for Book Nerds via Flavorwire

- Junot Diaz is killing it! National Book Award Finalists Announced here

- National Reading Group Month: Great Group Reads List announced here.

- Speaking of great reads and Hispanic Heritage: Here's my  Epic List: 105 Books to Read By Latinos

- Will whites see a black indie film like “Middle of Nowhere”? via Salon


Wednesday, October 03, 2012

How Not to Suck at Social Media

This cute little Youtube video, a guide to not sucking at Instagram, shares the fundamentals of social media sharing done right:



Monday, October 01, 2012

New Book: Have You Seen Marie? By Sandra Cisneros


The internationally acclaimed author of The House on Mango Street gives us a deeply moving tale of loss, grief, and healing: a lyrically told, richly illustrated fable for grown-ups about a woman’s search for a cat who goes missing in the wake of her mother’s death. 


Have You Seen Marie? By Sandra Cisneros: The word “orphan” might not seem to apply to a fifty-three-year-old woman. Yet this is exactly how Sandra feels as she finds herself motherless, alone like “a glove left behind at the bus station.” 

What just might save her is her search for someone else gone missing: Marie, the black-and-white cat of her friend, Roz, who ran off the day they arrived from Tacoma. 

As Sandra and Roz scour the streets of San Antonio, posting flyers and asking everywhere, “Have you seen Marie?” the pursuit of this one small creature takes on unexpected urgency and meaning. 

With full-color illustrations that bring this transformative quest to vivid life, Have You Seen Marie? showcases a beloved author’s storytelling magic, in a tale that reminds us how love, even when it goes astray, does not stay lost forever.


Sandra Cisneros firmando el libro de visitas d...
Sandra Cisneros firmando el libro de visitas de la Feria. (Photo Embajada de EEUU, Buenos Aires)
Sandra Cisneros is the author of two highly celebrated novels, The House on Mango Street and Caramelo. Her awards include National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, the Lannan Literary Award, the American Book Award, and a MacArthur Fellowship. Other books include the story collection Woman Hollering Creek; two books of poetry; and two books of children's literature. Her work has been translated into more than twenty languages. Cisneros is the founder of the Alfredo Cisneros Del Moral and Macondo Foundations, which serve creative writers.

Ester Hernández is an internationally acclaimed visual artist whose work is in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the Library of Congress, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Museo Casa Estudio Diego Rivera y Frida Kahlo in Mexico City. She lives in San Francisco.


 
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