Friday, August 31, 2012

Lit Links & Scoops

I'm moving out of town this weekend so this will be a short one. Have a great holiday weekend, everyone!

- Good News: Some of my photography will used in a documentary currently in production: Mayan Predictions, Myth or Reality by Tom Martens. To learn more about the project visit Mayan

- What Kind of Book Reader Are You? Diagnose yourself here

- Don’t think social will go away via Forbes

- Don't do it: The Best Book Reviews Money Can Buy via NY Times

- I discovered The Vanishers By Heidi Julavits on the Oprah.com website and devoured it this weekend. It was a fascinating mix of time travel, supernatural and feminist discourse that kept me enraptured in spite of all the packing I needed to do - not that I was procrastinating or anything.

- Cool infographic: The DNA of a successful book via mashable

- 5 Ideas That Will Change the World by 2025 - things to think about 

- Oldie but goodie: 47 Mind-Blowing Psychological Facts You Should Know About Yourself here

- Take a trip back in time to old Puerto Rico: Visit the ARCHIVO HISTORICO Y FOTOGRAFICO DE PUERTO RICO's photostream

- Places where it's okay to be an atheist: run away, run away
- Get ready for autumn: Asopao de Camarones recipe 

and remember:

“Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, 'Who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, fabulous?' Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. [universe] Your playing small does not serve the world. There is nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won't feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do. We were born to make manifest the glory of God that is within us. It's not just in some of us; it's in everyone. And as we let our own light shine, we unconsciously give other people permission to do the same. As we are liberated from our own fear, our presence automatically liberates others.” 
― Marianne Williamson, Return to Love: Reflections on the Principles of "A Course in Miracles"



Monday, August 27, 2012

New Book: The Secret Book of Frida Kahlo By F. G. Haghenbeck

In The Secret Book of Frida Kahlo: A Novel by F. G. Haghenbeck, he keeps her alive, if only in our fancy.

One of Mexico’s most celebrated new novelists, F. G. Haghenbeck offers a beautifully written reimagining of Frida Kahlo’s fascinating life and loves.


Portrait of Diego Rivera and Malu Block and Fr...
Portrait of Frida Kahlo de Rivera (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
More than half a century after her death, Frida Kahlo continues to inspire a devoted following. Her paintings command more money than any other female artist, and her work was the first by a Mexican artist to be purchased by the Louvre. Now her fascinating life is the basis for a brilliant novel in Frida Kahlo’s Secret Book.


 Acclaimed Mexican novelist F. G. Haghenbeck was inspired to write this book after a series of notebooks and sketchbooks were recently discovered among Frida’s belongings in Casa Azul, her home in CoyoacÁn, MÉxico City. Although her family never confirmed their authenticity, Haghenbeck imagines that one of the notebooks was a gift from her lover Tina Modotti after Frida nearly died. Frida called the notebook “El Libro de Hierba Santa” (“The Sacred Herbs Book”) and filled it with memories, ideas, and recipes for The Day of the Dead, the Mexican holiday that commemorates deceased friends and family through the cooking of a delicious feast of exotic dishes.


English: Statues of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rive...
Statues of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera in the courtyard of the Casa de Cultura Jesus Reyes Heroles in Coyoacan, Mexico City (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
 In a rich, luscious style bordering on magical realism, Haghenbeck takes readers on an intriguing ride through Frida’s life, including her long and tumultuous relationship with her lover Diego Rivera, the development of her artistic vision, her complex personality, her lust for life, and her existential feminism. The book also includes stories about the remarkable people who were a part of her life, including Georgia O'Keeffe (with whom she had an affair), Trotsky, Nelson Rockefeller, Hemingway, Dos Passos, Henry Miller, and DalÍ.


F. G. Haghenbeck, a native of Mexico, is an award-winning novelist and screenwriter. His novel Frida Kahlo’s Secret Book has been translated into ten languages. He lives in TehuacÁn, Mexico.


Friday, August 24, 2012

Lit Links & Scoops

.. and then there was a delightful surprise!
..(Photo: honor the gift)
- A list of 10 highly anticipated movies this season are based on books, from classics like 'Anna Karenina' to the final 'Twilight' installment via USA Today

- What is the future of storytelling? Immersion, interactivity, integration and impact via The Next Web

 - I'm so honored to be have made this list of the Global Top 100 Social Media Agencies & Consultants 2012-13 via SparkAh

- Know your audience: Millennials Buy More Books Than Everybody Else via Good.is

- 20 Social Media Touch Points You May Be Missing via Snapshot Social Media

- 2012 List of the the most sought after out-of-print books in America via Bookfinder

- Take it to the outside: The 6 Best Street Art Sites for Creative Inspiration via My Life Scoop

 - Why P&G Should Win an Olympic Gold Medal for Marketing - The three things that P&G did that made their ads standout.

- Junot Díaz’ on a few things he’d like to tell his swaggering teenage self via NY Mag

- 50 Best Books: Fall 2012's Must-Reads via HuffPo

Friday Five: How To...

How To Sell Books With Social Media via The Creative Penn

How To Read a Book a Week via Julien Smith

How to write a bad review via Salon

How to Deal with a Vicious Review of Your Book via The Awl

How To Talk About Books You Haven’t Read via BrainPickings

Trailer for a animated film based on the Selkies, mythical women who can take on the form of seals, were at one point pretty much my entire conception of “Ireland,” probably a weird thing for a kid with 50% Irish-born great-grand parents. The selkie story generally begins when a fisherman falls in love with one and steals the magical seal skin that allows her to change shape, and then marries her. It generally ends when she finds where he’s hidden the seal skin and escapes back to the sea, leaving him to raise their children alone.


Song Of The Sea - Conceptual Trailer from Cartoon Saloon on Vimeo.

Thursday, August 23, 2012

Forbes' 100 Most Powerful Women List: The Latinas

Yesterday Forbes announced its 9th annual ranking of the World’s 100 Most Powerful Women. You can see the whole list here, www.forbes.com/power-women.


Members of the 2012 ranking represent women in technology (a new category this year), politics, business, media, entertainment,  non-profits, as well as billionaires – all ranked by money, media presence and impact.   

The women represent 28 countries, have an average age of 55, and a combined 90 million Twitter followers.   

“This year’s Power Women exert influence in very different ways, and to very different ends, and all with very different impacts on the global community,” said Moira Forbes, President & Publisher, ForbesWoman. “

Whether leading multi-billion-dollar companies, governing countries, shaping the cultural fabric of our lives, or spearheading humanitarian initiatives, collectively these women are changing the planet in profoundly powerful and dynamic ways.


Below are the Latinas on the list:

  • Dilma Rosseff (No. 3) – President, Brazil
  • Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner (No. 16) – President, Argentina
  • Maria das Gracas Silva Foster (No. 20) – CEO, Petrobras, Brazil
  • Jennifer Lopez (No. 38), Entertainer, Entrepreneur, U.S./Puerto Rico   
  • Shakira Mebarak (No. 40) – Entertainer, Philanthropist, Columbia
  • Rosalia Mera (No. 54) – Billionaire Philanthropist, Spain
  • Sofia Vergara (No. 75) – Actress, Entrenpreneur Colombia 
  • Giselle Bündchen (No. 83) – Supermodel, Ambassador, UN Environmental Program, Brazil



Wednesday, August 22, 2012

A Short List of Literary Maps

Maps: The original infographic.

A Literary Map of Manhattan

http://www.nytimes.com/packages/khtml/2005/06/05/books/20050605_BOOKMAP_GRAPHIC.html

A Literary map of St. Petersburg


A Literary Map of Canada (1936)


A Literary Map of San Francisco


Tour the The Book Drum World Map here - an interactive crowd-sourced literary world map.


Monday, August 13, 2012

New Book: The Distance Between Us: A Memoir By Reyna Grande

My coworker who is a graphic designer walked by my desk as I was writing this one late evening and stopped short to tell me she loved the cover of The Distance Between Us: A Memoir By Reyna Grande. Now if that's not a compliment to one designer from another, I don't know what is. 


Reyna Grande is the author of two award-winning novels. Across a Hundred Mountains received an American Book Award, and Dancing with Butterflies was the recipient of an International Latino Book Award. Reyna lives in Los Angeles.



Mago pointed to a spot on the dirt floor and reminded me that my umbilical cord was buried there. “That way,” Mami told the midwife, “no matter where life takes her, she won’t ever forget where she came from.”


Then Mago touched my belly button . . . She said that my umbilical cord was like a ribbon that connected me to Mami. She said, “It doesn’t matter that there’s a distance btween us now. That cord is there forever.”


When Reyna Grande’s father leaves his wife and three children behind in a village in Mexico to make the dangerous trek across the border to the United States, he promises he will soon return from “El Otro Lado” (The Other Side) with enough money to build them a dream house where they can all live together. His promises become harder to believe as months turn into years. When he summons his wife to join him, Reyna and her siblings are deposited in the already overburdened household of their stern, unsmiling grandmother.


The three siblings are forced to look out for themselves; in childish games they find a way to forget the pain of abandonment and learn to solve very adult problems. When their mother at last returns, the reunion sets the stage for a dramatic new chapter in Reyna’s young life: her own journey to “El Otro Lado” to live with the man who has haunted her imagination for years, her long-absent father.


In this extraordinary memoir, award-winning writer Reyna Grande vividly brings to life her tumultuous early years, capturing all the confusion and contradictions of childhood, especially one spent torn between two parents and two countries. Elated when she feels the glow of her father’s love and approval, Reyna knows that at any moment he might turn angry or violent. Only in books and music and her rich imaginary life does she find solace, a momentary refuge from a world in which every place feels like “El Otro Lado.”


The Distance Between Us captures one girl’s passage from childhood to adolescence and beyond. A funny, heartbreaking, lyrical story, it reminds us that the joys and sorrows of childhood are always with us, invisible to the eye but imprinted on the heart, forever calling out to us of those places we first called home. 


Become a Fan on Facebook or follow Reyna via Twitter @reynagrande.

Sunday, August 12, 2012

Win a Copy of Count on Me: Tales of Sisterhoods and Fierce Friendships by Las Comadres Para Las Americas & Adriana V. Lopez

Next month, "beloved bestselling Latino authors, including Esmeralda Santiago, Carolina De Robertis, and Luis Alberto Urrea share moving personal stories of the many ways that sisterly bonds have powerfully impacted their lives in Count on Me: Tales of Sisterhoods and Fierce Friendships by Las Comadres Para Las Americas & Adriana V. Lopez.


What would you do, where would you be, without your comadre?


In Spanish, comadre is a powerful term. It encompasses many of the most complex and important relationships that exist between women: best friends, confidants, advisors, neighbors, and godmothers to each other’s children. 


For over a decade, Nora Comstock, President and CEO of the international organization Las Comadres Para Las Americas has been bringing Latina women together to support each other in the U.S. and overseas. Here, they collaborate with acclaimed author and editor Adriana Lopez to bring you the very best of today’s Latino writers as they illuminate the power of sisterly bonds.


In twelve creative nonfiction narratives, mostly by women, the authors reflect on the importance of comadres in their lives. Writers like Fabiola Santiago, Luis Alberto Urrea, Reyna Grande, and Teresa RodrÍguez tell their stories of survival in the United States and in Latin America, where success would have been impossible without their friendships. 


Favorites like Esmeralda Santiago, Lorraine Lopez, Carolina De Robertis, Daisy Martinez, and Ana Nogales explore what it means to have a comadre help you through years of struggle and self-discovery. And authors Sofia Quintero, Stephanie Elizondo Griest, and Michelle Herrera Mulligan look at the powerful impact of the humor and humanity that their comadres brought to each one’s life, even in the darkest moments."



Nora de Hoyos Comstock is the National and International Founder, President, and CEO of Las Comadres Para Las Americas, an international organization that has been bringing together thousands of Latina women for more than a decade to support and advise one another. 


Adriana Lopez is the author and editor of several books. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and The Washington Post, among other publications. She lives in New York and Madrid.



Win A Copy

I have an extra ARC copy that I received in error and I would like to raffle it off to an interested reader. The book will be published by Atria on September 4, 2012, and will retail for $16.00. Please note this is a pre-release copy and not a finished book.

Please enter below for your chance to win. The winner will be chosen randomly via the Rafflecopter algorithm and will be contacted via email.


a Rafflecopter giveaway

Friday, August 10, 2012

Lit links & Scoops

Where I collect and share all the interesting random things I've read all week:

- The Slave Who Circumnavigated The World via The Awl

- Brazilian author Clarah Averbuck on why she wrote Cat Life: ""Unfortunately, Brazil is still a very sexist country. Girls are still seen like objects. The most important thing a woman can do is just be pretty, and it's a shame," she says." via NPR

- See Also: “I’m like, ‘I just made history and people are focused on my hair?’” Gabby Douglas rocks.

- Love: A Booklover’s Map of Literary Geography circa 1933 via BrainPickings

- Oddballs: People Without Facebook Accounts Are 'Suspicious.' on Forbes

- Stress-Free: Recipe for 1x/week Cleansing/Detox Bath Soak via Whole Living

- 7 Foods a Nutritionist Would Never Eat via Shape

- THE SEARCH FOR THE NEXT SRIRACHA - How To Make Sofrito, The DIY Condiment brought to you by The Awl

- Holy bat babies - Cuteness!

- Why dating artists is a terrible idea: I INSPIRED A "BAD" VERSION OF MYSELF ON AARON SORKIN'S "THE NEWSROOM" via xoJane.

- And now you know: How Advertisers Convinced Americans They Smelled Bad: A schoolgirl and a former traveling Bible salesman helped turn deodorants and antiperspirants from niche toiletries into an $18 billion industry via Smithsonian

- Colson Whitehead's novel Zone One is a post-apocalyptic tale of a Manhattan crippled by a plague and overrun with zombies. He explains that he created the novel, in part, to pay homage to the grimy 1970s New York of his childhood. at NPR

- Also How to Write By COLSON WHITEHEAD - awesomeness via NYTimes.

- The Daily Chicana on Remembering My Brown-Skinned Dolls via Racialicious

- Chinese/Jamaican Poet StacyAnn Chin talks about being a single mother, in-vitro fertilization,and how her decision to have a child was met by the Black and LGBT community. Read more at Mater Mea.

- Read MOLLY RINGWALD's story about Infidelity here

- This October, Designers & Books are hosting the first-ever book fair in New York City to focus on architecture and design book publishing. Go here.

- Amazing #1: Site tells you what an awesome social media early adopter you are via ShinyShiny
- Amazing #2: AMAZON: We now buy more Kindle eBooks than printed books Here.

- Style, yes please: 20 fashion-focused Pinterest accounts via Mashable.

- Nicely done: A gender free toy store -Harrods Department Store via The Mary Sue

- The PlayTales App Teaches Your Kids To Love Books With Interactive Kids Stories via MakeUseof

- I cannot wait to go to the Netherlands this fall: AMSTERDAM CITY GUIDE: WHY I LOVE AMSTERDAM, THE GREATEST LITTLE CITY IN WORLD via MeltingButter.

Thursday, August 09, 2012

Seed of Hope Giveaway: Win a Free Copy of The Lorax DVD & a Gift Bag

As some of you may recall, I shared my fond memories of discovering Dr. Seuss' The Lorax recently here. Now I have been offered a chance to offer you and your family the same opportunity. I am giving away 2 The Lorax Gift Bags that each include:
  • 2 Grocery bags (one large, one small)
  • 2 pencils
  • 2 sticker sets
  • 3 activity sheets
  • 1 beach ball
  • 1 DVD/Blu-Ray
To enter sign up below and tell me which Dr. Seuss book is your favorite.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Wednesday, August 08, 2012

The Mexican Film Macario & My Uncle the Projectionist

When I was a little girl, my uncle worked as a cinema projectionist, operating the movie projector in a local New York City movie theater. Whenever, I visited my grandparents, especially during the holidays, he would bring out his old movie projector and show films right onto the back wall of the house for all of us, young and old, to see together. It was great and I have so many happy memories of these special private screenings.

One movie we saw that has always stuck in my head was Macario (Mexico, 1960).


The story of Macario, a poor starving mexican woodcutter, who dreams of eating a whole roast turkey by himself. It weaves a tale of magical realism, in which encounters with the Devil, God, and Death with unexpected results. It is based on the novel The Third Guest by the writer known as B. Traven. The first Mexican film to be nominated for an Academy Award for Best Film in a Foreign Language, Macario is a must-see.


It's funny because I never thought these private family screenings out of the ordinary or especially cool back then but now I look back and see how my upbringing shaped me (my love of the arts, culture and media, technology, and foreign language cinema) and how very lucky I am.


Tuesday, August 07, 2012

Olympian Marlen Esparza on Missing Out & Retiring from Boxing

I received news a couple of weeks ago, regarding Marlen Esparza and the MAKERS initiative.

The MAKERS: Women Who Make America is a landmark digital video and broadcast initiative from AOL and PBS that chronicles the stories of exceptional women whose pioneering contributions shape our world.

Esparza, the first woman to qualify for the U.S. Olympic boxing team, is now featured on the site. In her interviews she talks about her love for the sport, fighting as a reminder, and how tough it is to be everything, among other conversations.

Visit Makers.com/marlen-esparza to see the rest of her Makers Moments



Monday, August 06, 2012

New Book: The Sadness of the Samurai By Victor del Arbol

I've been meaning to write about The Sadness of the Samurai: A Novel By Victor del Arbol since its English debut at the end of May and just haven't had a chance to feature it.


This fierce, edgy, brisk, and enthralling, brilliant novel by Victor del Árbol pushes the boundaries of the traditional historical novel and in doing so creates a work of incredible power that resonates long after the last page has been turned.


When Isabel, a Spanish aristocrat living in the pro-Nazi Spain of 1941, becomes involved in a plot to kill her Fascist husband, she finds herself betrayed by her mysterious lover. The effects of her betrayal play out in a violent struggle for power in both family and government over three generations, intertwining her story with that of a young lawyer named Maria forty years later. 


During the attempted Fascist coup of 1981, Maria is accused of plotting the prison escape of a man she successfully prosecuted for murder. As Maria's and Isabel's narratives unfold they encircle each other, creating a page-turning literary thriller firmly rooted in history.


Victor del Árbol holds a degree in history from the University of Barcelona. He has worked for Catalonia's police force since 1992. In 2006, he won the Tiflos de Novela Award for The Weight of the Dead. The Sadness of the Samurai is his first novel to be translated into English. You can follow him on Twitter @victordelarbol.


"La “tristeza del samurái” es la que todos sentimos alguna vez en la vida, cuando descubrimos, o nos hacen descubrir que aquello que siempre quisimos ser, que lo mejor de nosotros, es solo un personaje que nos hemos ido creando y creyendo a lo largo de la vida y que se ha acabado comiendo a quien realmente somos. Todos quisieran ser mejores de lo que son, todos desearíamos ser aquello que los demás esperan de nosostros: un buen padre, un buen hijo, un buen amante, un buen amigo, una buena abogada, una buena aristócrata… Pero no siempre lo conseguimos, a veces no lo logramos nunca." via Revistadeletras

You can read an excerpt here.

NYC: Come See Me at The Comadres y Compadres Writers Conference

I will be speaking at the upcoming Comadres y Compadres Writers Conference on October 6, 2012, in New York City, drawing from my experience as social media strategist and former book publicist. I hope you all can make it and would appreciate it if you help spread the word as well.

Time: 8:00 am to 6 pm
Date: Saturday, October 6, 2012
Place: Medgar Evers College
The City University of New York
1650 Bedford Ave. Brooklyn, New York 11225

The Comadres y Compadres Writers Conference, which will take place at the Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York on October 6, 2012, will provide Latino writers with access to published Latino authors as well as agents and editors who have a proven track record of publishing Latino writers.

In addition, the CCWC will offer an insider’s perspective on how best to navigate the particular challenges and opportunities faced by Latino writers in the current publishing landscape, as well as foster a vibrant national community of writers akin to what Las Comadres has already created with its Las Comadres international network and its Las Comadres and Friends National Latino Book Club and Teleconference Series.

Keynote Speaker: Sonia Manzano, Actress and Author.

Having originated the role of “Maria” on Sesame Street, Manzano wrote two children’s books, No Dogs Allowed (Simon and Schuster, 2004) and A Box Full of Kittens (Simon and Schuster, 2007), and will have her first YA novel, The Revolution of Evelyn Serrano, published by Scholastic in Fall 2012.

Participants currently include Johanna Castillo, Vice President & Senior Editor/Atria, Simon & Schuster: Jaime de Pablos, Director/Vintage Español, Knopf Doubleday Group; Adriana Dominguez, Agent/Full Circle Literary; Mercedes Fernandez, Assistant Editor/Dafina Books, Kensington Publishing; Sulay Hernandez, Editor/Other Press; Cheryl Klein, Executive Editor/Arthur A. Levine Books; Selina L. McLemore, Senior Editor/Grand Central Publishing; Christina Morgan, Editor/Harcourt Houghton Mifflin; Lukas Ortiz, Managing Director/Philip G. Spitzer Literary Agency, Inc.;  Diane Stockwell, Founder/Globo Libros Literary Management; and Stacy Whitman, Founder and Editorial Director/Tu Books. (AND ME!)

To register to attend, sponsor or attend as vendor or volunteer, click here for more information.

Save the Date & See who else will be there:

RSVP via LinkedIn
RSVP via Facebook
RSVP via Plancast
Las Comadres Conference Program


Sunday, August 05, 2012

New Book: Latinos, Inc.The Marketing and Making of a People

English: Seal of the United States Census Bure...
English: Seal of the United States Census Bureau. The blazon is defined here as: On a shield an open book beneath which is a lamp of knowledge emitting rays above in base two crossed quills. Around the whole a wreath of single leaves, surrounded by an outer band bearing between two stars the words "U.S. Department of Commerce" in the upper portion and "Bureau of the Census" in the lower portion, the lettering concentric with an inner beaded rim and an outer dentilated rim. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
When did Latinos become an ethnic group or we just a segment of a target audience? If you've ever asked yourself this question, this new book by Arlene Dávila, an Assistant Professor of American Studies and Anthropology at New York University, explores theories of identity and ethnicity in the U.S.

Latinos, Inc.: The Marketing and Making of a People


Both Hollywood and corporate America are taking note of the marketing power of the growing Latino population in the United States. And as salsa takes over both the dance floor and the condiment shelf, the influence of Latin culture is gaining momentum in American society as a whole. 


Yet the increasing visibility of Latinos in mainstream culture has not been accompanied by a similar level of economic parity or political enfranchisement. In this important, original, and entertaining book, Arlene Dávila provides a critical examination of the Hispanic marketing industry and of its role in the making and marketing of U.S. Latinos.


Dávila finds that Latinos' increased popularity in the marketplace is simultaneously accompanied by their growing exotification and invisibility. She scrutinizes the complex interests that are involved in the public representation of Latinos as a generic and culturally distinct people and questions the homogeneity of the different Latino subnationalities that supposedly comprise the same people and group of consumers. 


In a fascinating discussion of how populations have become reconfigured as market segments, she shows that the market and marketing discourse become important terrains where Latinos debate their social identities and public standing.

Saturday, August 04, 2012

New Book: Racial Indigestion: Eating Bodies in the 19th Century

I'm sooo reading this: Racial Indigestion: Eating Bodies in the 19th Century - because it totally relates to my comments here.


The act of eating is both erotic and violent, as one wholly consumes the object being eaten. At the same time, eating performs a kind of vulnerability to the world, revealing a fundamental interdependence between the eater and that which exists outside her body. 


Racial Indigestion explores the links between food, visual and literary culture in the nineteenth-century United States to reveal how eating produces political subjects by justifying the social discourses that create bodily meaning.


Combing through a visually stunning and rare archive of children’s literature, architectural history, domestic manuals, dietetic tracts, novels and advertising, Racial Indigestion tells the story of the consolidation of nationalist mythologies of whiteness via the erotic politics of consumption. 


Less a history of commodities than a history of eating itself, the book seeks to understand how eating became a political act, linked to appetite, vice, virtue, race and class inequality and, finally, the queer pleasures and pitfalls of a burgeoning commodity culture. In so doing, Racial Indigestion sheds light on contemporary “foodie” culture’s vexed relationship to nativism, nationalism and race privilege.


Kyla Wazana Tompkins is an Associate Professor of English and Gender and Women’s Studies at Pomona College. She is a former journalist and restaurant critic.


For more, visit the author's tumblr page: http://racialindigestion.tumblr.com 


Friday, August 03, 2012

Lit Links & Scoops

- The Plantation in Puerto Rican Popular Music


The Biggest One-Man Run Online Book Club Leader Never Reads the Books

- Boston Review’s Paula M.L. Moya did a two part interview with Junot Díaz here.

- How to brew your own hibiscus sun tea. recipe here. Cooling, and packed with antioxidants. I add: 1 tablespoon of rose hips, 1 tablespoon of elderberries, 1 tablespoon strips of orange zest too.


- They fell in love at Borders. via Salon


- 10 Latino Olympians to follow on Twitter via NBC Latino


- A smart and candid rant about confused anger, girl crushes and Sheila Heti's acclaimed novel on friendship. via Salon


- There is still time to participate in the 3rd annual Latina Week of Action for Reproductive Justice - Soy Poderosa blog carnival. Sign up here.


- Dazzling: 37 Home Library Design Ideas With a Jay-Dropping Visual and Cultural Effect (here), 

The 20 Most Beautiful Bookstores in the World (here) and Bringing Maker-Style Garage Tinkering Into the Local Library (here)


The Intercultural Self or, Race, Culture and This White Chick; Part One

- Cool KickStarter Project: A Crowdfunded Farm Brings Traditional Mexican Flavors to New York via Good.is


- Speaking of Food: Latin Eats: NYC Restaurant Week List

-  The trailer for this book includes a girl in blackface - enough said. Read the article at xoJane.


- More yum: 11 Delicious Latin food blogs you need to follow

- Some Brief Thoughts on Media Violence and Critical Literacy via PETER GUTIERREZ.


- Ten Reasons Parents Should Read Multicultural Books to Kids via Incultureparent

- How to Survive in a Interracial Relationship When You Don’t Have the Support of Your Family & Friends via Chantilly Patiño.


Coming Soon:


Now on Sundance:

 
 
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