Thursday, August 27, 2009

Laurie Sandell: Tonight at Barnes & Noble (UWS)

Laurie Sandell will present and read from her graphic memoir, THE IMPOSTOR’S DAUGHTER

Tonight at 7pm

Barnes & Noble (UWS)
2289 Broadway at 82nd Street
New York, NY 10024

Tuesday, August 25, 2009

You Just Lost One!

I'm back home now and this is so my vibe right now:



Now don't you understand man universal law?
What you throw out comes back to you, star
Never underestimate those who you scar
Cause karma, karma, karma comes back to you hard!
You can't hold God's people back that long
The chain of Shatan wasn't made that strong
Trying to pretend like your word is your bond
But until you do right, all you do will go wrong
Now some might mistake this for just a simple song
And some don't know what they have 'til it's gone
Now even when you're gone you can still be reborn
And, from the night can arrive the sweet dawn
Now, some might listen and some might shun
And some may think that they've reached perfection
If you look closely you'll see what you've become
Cause you might win some but you just lost one!


You might win some but you just lost one!
You might win some but you just lost one!!
You might win some but you just lost one!
You might win some but you just lost one!!

Wednesday, August 19, 2009

The Beloit College Mindset List for the Class of 2013

Each August since 1998, Beloit College has released the Beloit College Mindset List. It provides a look at the cultural touchstones that shape the lives of students entering college. It is the creation of Beloit’s Keefer Professor of the Humanities Tom McBride and Emeritus Public Affairs Director Ron Nief. It is used around the world as the school year begins, as a reminder of the rapidly changing frame of reference for this new generation.



Here's the 12th annual list:

The Beloit College Mindset List for the Class of 2013

Most students entering college for the first time this fall were born in 1991.

1. For these students, Martha Graham, Pan American Airways, Michael Landon, Dr. Seuss, Miles Davis, The Dallas Times Herald, Gene Roddenberry, and Freddie Mercury have always been dead.
2. Dan Rostenkowski, Jack Kevorkian, and Mike Tyson have always been felons.
3. The Green Giant has always been Shrek, not the big guy picking vegetables.
4. They have never used a card catalog to find a book.
5. Margaret Thatcher has always been a former prime minister.
6. Salsa has always outsold ketchup.
7. Earvin "Magic" Johnson has always been HIV-positive.
8. Tattoos have always been very chic and highly visible.
9. They have been preparing for the arrival of HDTV all their lives.
10. Rap music has always been main stream.
11. Chocolate chip cookie dough ice cream has always been a flavor choice.
12. Someone has always been building something taller than the Willis (née Sears) Tower in Chicago.
13. The KGB has never officially existed.
14. Text has always been hyper.
15. They never saw the “Scud Stud” (but there have always been electromagnetic stud finders.)
16. Babies have always had a Social Security Number.
17. They have never had to “shake down” an oral thermometer.
18. Bungee jumping has always been socially acceptable.
19. They have never understood the meaning of R.S.V.P.
20. American students have always lived anxiously with high-stakes educational testing.
21. Except for the present incumbent, the President has never inhaled.
22. State abbreviations in addresses have never had periods.
23. The European Union has always existed.
24. McDonald's has always been serving Happy Meals in China.
25. Condoms have always been advertised on television.
26. Cable television systems have always offered telephone service and vice versa.
27. Christopher Columbus has always been getting a bad rap.
28. The American health care system has always been in critical condition.
29. Bobby Cox has always managed the Atlanta Braves.
30. Desperate smokers have always been able to turn to Nicoderm skin patches.
31. There has always been a Cartoon Network.
32. The nation’s key economic indicator has always been the Gross Domestic Product (GDP).
33. Their folks could always reach for a Zoloft.
34. They have always been able to read books on an electronic screen.
35. Women have always outnumbered men in college.
36. We have always watched wars, coups, and police arrests unfold on television in real time.
37. Amateur radio operators have never needed to know Morse code.
38. Belarus, Moldova, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Armenia, Latvia, Georgia, Lithuania, and Estonia have always been independent nations.
39. It's always been official: President Zachary Taylor did not die of arsenic poisoning.
40. Madonna’s perspective on Sex has always been well documented.
41. Phil Jackson has always been coaching championship basketball.
42. Ozzy Osbourne has always been coming back.
43. Kevin Costner has always been Dancing with Wolves, especially on cable.
44. There have always been flat screen televisions.
45. They have always eaten Berry Berry Kix.
46. Disney’s Fantasia has always been available on video, and It’s a Wonderful Life has always been on Moscow television.
47. Smokers have never been promoted as an economic force that deserves respect.
48. Elite American colleges have never been able to fix the price of tuition.
49. Nobody has been able to make a deposit in the Bank of Credit and Commerce International (BCCI).
50. Everyone has always known what the evening news was before the Evening News came on.
51. Britney Spears has always been heard on classic rock stations.
52. They have never been Saved by the Bell
53. Someone has always been asking: “Was Iraq worth a war?”
54. Most communities have always had a mega-church.
55. Natalie Cole has always been singing with her father.
56. The status of gays in the military has always been a topic of political debate.
57. Elizabeth Taylor has always reeked of White Diamonds.
58. There has always been a Planet Hollywood.
59. For one reason or another, California’s future has always been in doubt.
60. Agent Starling has always feared the Silence of the Lambs.
61. “Womyn” and “waitperson” have always been in the dictionary.
62. Members of Congress have always had to keep their checkbooks balanced since the closing of the House Bank.
63. There has always been a computer in the Oval Office.
64. CDs have never been sold in cardboard packaging.
65. Avon has always been “calling” in a catalog.
66. NATO has always been looking for a role.
67. Two Koreas have always been members of the UN.
68. Official racial classifications in South Africa have always been outlawed.
69. The NBC Today Show has always been seen on weekends.
70. Vice presidents of the United States have always had real power.
71. Conflict in Northern Ireland has always been slowly winding down.
72. Migration of once independent media like radio, TV, videos and compact discs to the computer has never amazed them.
73. Nobody has ever responded to “Help, I’ve fallen and I can’t get up.”
74. Congress could never give itself a mid-term raise.
75. There has always been blue Jell-O.

Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Random Tidbits

Slam Poet Mayda Del Valle Makes Oprah Winfrey's Power List

Twilight Gets A Latina Vampire In Catalina Sandino Moreno

There's a new vampire sheriff on TRUE BLOOD and she's a Latina

Oscar Casares Talks To Guanabee About Amigoland

Latino Nutrition Month Inspires Latinos To Bring Healthy Choices To The Table

Great article on Dolls: It Matters if You’re Black or White

A Q& A with Ed Morales about documentary “Whose Barrio?” covering the gentrification or the selling of NYC’s Spanish Harlem, El Barrio

StoryCorps Historias is an initiative to record and archive the diverse stories and life experiences of Latinos across the country. Sharing these stories preserves our history, honors our heritage, and captures the true spirit of our community. If you would like to participate in StoryCorps Historias, make a reservation to record your story today.

Must watch TV: HBO: George Lopez: Tall, Dark & Chicano

Choose What You Read NY: Free Books/Tues/NYC Subway

Megan from Blogads just sent me a link to Bringing Crime And Punishment Back To The NYC Commute about how Buku "Sarkar has begun Choose What You Read NY, an organization that collects old books and distributes them - free - in subway stations on the first Tuesday of every month.

With nothing more than a folding table and a sign reading, "Free Books for your Commute" she has led a project that is part recycling effort, part recession relief, part literacy campaign, and all heart."

I love stuff like this, kudos to Sarkar for doing such a great job combating literacy, waste and helping others.

If you live in NYC and want to donate books, check here for Drop box locations

New Allende on the Horizon: The Island Below the Sea

Isabel Allende’s first novel since 2006 titled, La Isla Bajo El Mar (The Island Below the Sea) published in Spanish first debuts this month. Vintage Español brings us this novel - the story of a slave fighting to win her freedom in 18th century Santo Domingo. No word yet on when the English edition will be available...

Allende Articulates Her “Obsession” with Freedom in New Novel

BOGOTA – Chilean-American writer Isabel Allende said in an interview published Friday in the online edition of Colombian daily El Tiempo that her new novel, which features a female slave as protagonist, articulates her “obsession” with freedom.

“My life is marked by my obsession with freedom ... All forms of oppression and injustice affect me personally and slavery, of course, is the most extreme form. I had to write this book. I think Zarite, the protagonist, was made from my own rib,” said Allende, the author of “The House of the Spirits” and one of the world’s most widely read Latin American authors.

While writing her novel “El Zorro” (Zorro) in 2005, Allende said Zarite (Tete), the female slave who is the main character of her new work – titled “La isla bajo el mar” (The Island Below the Sea) – “came to her” in the U.S. city of New Orleans.

“New Orleans at the beginning of the 1800s received a large number of French immigrants who fled the 1791-1804 slave revolt in the colony of Saint-Domingue, which today is Haiti,” said the writer, who currently lives in California.

Upon further investigation, Allende said she felt the need to articulate the cruelty that occurred in that Caribbean colony, which received 30,000 slaves annually.

“She embodies freedom of the spirit, a force as powerful as a hurricane,” the writer said of Tete, who in the novel is sold as a young girl by Madame Delphine to Violette to be the servant of her lover, French landowner Toulouse Valmorain.

According to Allende, “the worst form of slavery” in Latin America “occurred in Saint-Domingue, where there were 34,000 free people and a half-million slaves.”

“The idea the planters had was to work their slaves to death; if they lasted four or five years they were satisfied because it was more profitable to replace them with fresh meat from Africa,” she said.

“Despite all that, Haiti was the first independent republic in the Americas (after the United States). The Haitian people are friendly, creative, wonderful; it’s a tragedy that that country is ruined,” the author said of the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere.



Allende added that people should not forget that “slavery still exists, although there are attempts to hide it. They still sell people, especially women and children. They’re invisible beings.”

The worldwide release of “La isla bajo el mar” is scheduled for Aug. 20.



Via EFE

Sunday, August 16, 2009

Grab your Free 10 Track Sampler from Latina Magazine

"Scouting the most underrated musical talents in the Spanish-speaking world requires countless hours at sweaty clubs, crammed concerts, and random basement parties, not to mention scouring the internet. But someone's got to do it!

So just in time for all those summer BBQs and rooftop rumbas, we bring you a guide to the year's most buzzworthy acts, courtesy of Latina magazine." -- iTunes Store

Grab your 10 free Latin Music tracks here.

Stuff I'm Totally Sweating

I was lucky enough to finally get my hands on a copy of The Strain: Book One of The Strain Trilogy by Guillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan (my review copy never came for some reason) and I read it in two days flat. It was a great read, the kind you don't want to end - I cannot wait for Book Two. I finished it right before the meteor shower, which made me a little creeped out - but you'll understand once you finished.

I was delighted to find how much of New York is covered in the action-packed book - from Spanish Harlem to Ground Zero - The Strain is a tour de force.


You can visit www.thestraintrilogy.com for more information.

---------


I recently bought Sally Hansen Cooling Foot Spray because a long time ago I fell for the sensation of cool tingly feet after trying my best friend's Kiss My Face peppermint foot cream.

This spray has multi vitamins and Tea Tree Oil and smells delightful. It's not only refreshing and antiseptic but also repels mosquitos. I've taken to spraying it all over my legs, especially on a sweltering day like today (it's 92 degrees today in NYC) but be warned it might sting a bit if you are freshly shaved.

The Backstory

Realidades Nov. 1, 1950 Lolita Lebron

Thursday, August 13, 2009

Out and About from the Web

Just a few more comments needed: Giveaway: Help Feed the Hungry in the US

What Do I Read Next: How To Recommend POC titles to non-POC readers

Not good: "According to a statement by Labor Secretary Hilda Solis, the unemployment rate went down to 9.4% last month, however unemployment rates among Blacks and Hispanics did not change and showed the highest losses."

Oh, my: How to hack a Sony Reader

Bravo: George Lopez took home the Teen Choice Award for “Choice Comedian.”

You Tell Me: When Do You Stop Reading a Book?

Looking forward to reading The Girl Who Fell From the Sky...Read more.

Latinas are making history this year! Chita Rivera Awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom

My mom admires this man so much, our beloved Siamese was named "Polito," in his honor:
"SBS’ VP of programming Polito Vega will celebrate 50 years in the Spanish-language radio industry at the end of the month with two concerts at Madison Square Garden. The shows will feature performances by Laura Pausini, Alejandro Sanz, Gloria Trevi and Enrique Iglesias, among others."

Chile National Literature Prize Winner Alfonso Calderon Dies

White Nationalist Anger and Violence: A Preview of Even Greater Anti-immigrant Violence?

Someone emailed me this and I wanted to share:

An Old Farmer's Advice:
* Your fences need to be horse-high, pig-tight and bull-strong. *
*Keep skunks and bankers at a distance.*
*Life is simpler when you plow around the stump.*
* A bumble bee is considerably faster than a John Deere tractor.*
* Words that soak into your ears are whispered...not yelled.*
* Meanness don't jes' happen overnight.*
* Forgive your enemies. It messes up their heads.*
* Do not corner something that you know is meaner than you.*
* It don't take a very big person to carry a grudge.*
* You cannot unsay a cruel word.*
* Every path has a few puddles.*
* When you wallow with pigs, expect to get dirty.*
* The best sermons are lived, not preached. *
Most of the stuff people worry about ain't never gonna happen anyway.*
* Don't judge folks by their relatives.*
* Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.*
* Live a good, honorable life. Then when you get older and think back, you'll enjoy it a second time.*
* Don't interfere with somethin' that ain't bothering you none.*
* Timing has a lot to do with the outcome of a Rain dance.*
* If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop diggin'.*
* Sometimes you get, and sometimes you get got.*
* The biggest troublemaker you'll probably ever have to deal with, watches you from the mirror every mornin'.*
* Always drink upstream from the herd.*
Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.*
* Lettin' the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier than puttin' it back in.*
* If you get to thinkin' you're a person of some influence, try orderin' somebody else's dog around.*
* Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply.*
*Speak kindly. Leave the rest to God.*
-- Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.

Tuesday, August 11, 2009

Giveaway: Help Feed the Hungry in the US

I was contacted recently by ShopRite Partners In Caring about their Bloggers In Caring: Blog It Forward To Fight Hunger program. From their site:

Facts About Hunger in America

• More than 36 million Americans (11 percent of U.S. households) suffer from food insecurity. Food insecurity is when you are unsure when or what your next meal will be.

• Statewide food insecurity rates in the ShopRite area are:
New Jersey – 7.7%
Delaware – 7.8%
Maryland – 9.5%
Connecticut – 8.6%
Pennsylvania – 10%
New York – 9.8%

• More than 12 million children are growing up hungry

• Nearly 2 million seniors suffer from food insecurity

• During 2007, nearly 18 million children received free or reduced lunch

• A $1 donation can purchase 10 pounds of food from a food bank

After reading the above statistics on their website, my mind reels to think about what the current data must be now with the economy and degree of unemployment.

I encourage you to join the fight to end hunger, charity after all, begins at home.

Ways you can help:

Support ShopRite Partners In Caring by shopping at your local ShopRite, and look for the special ShopRite Partners In Caring shelf tag. The manufacturers of these products will make a donation to ShopRite Partners In Caring, contributing to the program and its success.

Contribute to the annual Check Out Hunger program at participating ShopRite stores by asking your cashier for a $1, $3 or $5 donation tag at check-out; your contribution will be added to your grocery bill.

Support local charities by contributing to their fundraisers, or help organize a fundraiser in your neighborhood or at work (where permitted). In addition to the money you can raise, talking to people you know about hunger helps raise awareness of the issue and involve them in the effort to address it.

Volunteer at a food bank or food pantry, soup kitchen or other charity in your community, helping them to help others in your community. Invite your friends and family, co-workers, members of your religious congregation, or clubs to which you belong, to join you.

Talk to your children about the effects of hunger on other children in your community and encourage them to get involved. Volunteering together is a great way to teach them about the importance of helping others and make them more likely to remain involved in service as adults.

For more on the program and more ways to help, visit http://www.shopritepartnersincaring.org/

How We Can Help Together:

General Mills & ShopRite will donate one box of cereal to a local food bank for the first 30 people who comment on my post. They will donate up to 3,000 boxes from all the participating blogs.

UPDATE: WE DID IT! GIVEAWAY IS NOW CLOSED! Winner will be emailed.


To help spur 30 comments, goodwill, and celebrate the last days of summer, I am giving away:


One brand new, black, one-piece bathing suit (size small), a beach towel, some sunscreen, and of course, a book of your choice (under $15), to one random person who comments on this post in the next week (* but only if we get at least 30 comments).

Your comments are appreciated!

Carolina De Robertis' The Invisible Mountain

Carolina De Robertis' first novel, The Invisible Mountain, will be published in the U.S. this month and will soon be published in thirteen other countries and nine languages. The lovely Uruguayan author currently lives in California and is already working on her second novel.


The Invisible Mountain is a "story about family and the power of love and legacy, a generational saga following the lives of three generations of women over 90 years."

Read more about it at thedailybeast.com.

Visit www.carolinaderobertis.com.

I absolutely love that her website is browsable in both Spanish and English.

Monday, August 10, 2009

A Cuppa Teardrop Tea

When I was little one of my most dearest books was Owl at Home by Arnold Lobel, which I begged my mother to read over and over again for me. Our favorite story was the one where Owl sits down and thinks sad thoughts to collect enough tears for teardrop tea.

Whenever I am having a woe is me moment, I think about the teardrop tea and start brewing my own cup.

My thoughts for my teardrop tea:

- Another rejection letter
- Being asked by your mother if you are pregnant (again and again)
- The unspoken tension in the room
- Deadbeat dads
- The bags underneath your eyes
- Days long gone
- Fueling the tiny doubt that tells you that perhaps the Universe is conspiring AGAINST you instead of with you
- The things you have no control over...

Then I visualize putting that toxic cup down and just walking away from it.

Belinda Acosta's Damas, Dramas, and Ana Ruiz

I never had a quinceañera or a sweet 16 but I have always been intrigued by them. After watching reality shows like Quiero Mis Quinces (MTV Tr3s) and My Super Sweet 16 (MTV) one is left with a certain image of the whole ordeal.

Luckily for those of us, who have never actually experienced putting together one of these ultimate affairs, author Belinda Acosta takes you through the experience from the mother's angle in Damas, Dramas, and Ana Ruiz.

She's collecting quinceañera fotos for a slide show to show prior to readings and book signings. Send what you have to nuevob@gmail.com

Visit qclubbooks for more information and join the Quinceañera Club Fansite on FaceBook.

The World Has Changed

When I was little, we had wax vampire teeth that you got from the pica (candy machine) or candy store, not Bling Teeth.


At Ghettobaskets.com, you can buy a gift basket for that special "ghetto" person in your life that includes Hot Sauce, Pregnancy Test, Grape Drink, Batteries, Beef Jerky, Potted Meat, Pork Rinds, Noodles in a Cup, After Shave, Plastic Commemorative Plate, Religious Candle, Porcelain Figurine, Kung-Fu DVD, Cassette or VHS Tape, Doo Rag, Vapor Rub, Energy Drank, Soap, and an Outdated Calendar.

Some of this stuff, makes you laugh (I won't play - you could walk in my mom's house and find about 80% of this, such as the potted meat, religious candle, vicks, an outdated calendar and more) but some of it just makes me sad. Who's laughing at who?

Nélida Piñon's Voices of the Desert

I was rather taken by the beauty of the cover of Voices of the Desert: A novel and then discovered the book was written by a Latina, Nélida Piñon and translated by Cliff Landers.

About Voices of the Desert

From one of Brazil’s most beloved writers, a magical tale of lust, power, betrayal, and forgiveness set in the royal court of thirteenth-century Baghdad: a sumptuous retelling of the legend of Scheherazade that illuminates her character as never before. In exquisite prose, Nélida Piñon transports us from the Caliph’s private sanctum to the crowded streets of the forbidden marketplace, to the high seas of imagination, and to Scheherazade’s innermost life, as she weaves her tales night after night.

As the novel opens, the Caliph, betrayed by the Sultana, vows to take his revenge on the women of his kingdom by marrying a different virgin each night and executing her at dawn. Born into privilege, a daughter of the Vizier, Scheherazade decides to risk her life by marrying the Caliph, in an effort to save the women of Baghdad.

Every evening, in an amorous battle devoid of love, Scheherazade succumbs to the Caliph’s advances, and every night, with the help of her devoted sister Dinazarda and her loyal slave Jasmine, she entices the Caliph with her storytelling, unfurling accounts from the desert, the tundra, the bazaar, the golden-domed mosques.

Scheherazade gives herself entirely to her characters, speaking as both man and woman, capturing the call of the muezzin, the speech of the caravans, the voices of the scattered tribes from the Red Sea to Damascus. The Caliph, unable to sate his curiosity, prolongs her life each day, desperate to hear how her stories will end. As Scheherazade brings him the tales of his people, he begins to question his cruel mandate and his own hardened heart, until, finally, Scheherazade discovers how to live out her story in a way that not even she could have imagined.

Here, for the first time, is the story of One Thousand and One Nights told from Scheherazade’s perspective, giving us the full breadth and depth of her longings and desires, her jealousies and resentments. Voices of the Desert is the ancient story reinvented—as a woman’s story, an erotic allegory, a haunting meditation on the power of storytelling.

About the Author



Nélida Piñon is a native of Rio de Janeiro, where she still lives. A former professor at the University of Miami, she has also been a visiting writer at Harvard, Columbia, Georgetown, and Johns Hopkins. The recipient of numerous literary awards, in 1996 she became the first woman elected president of the Brazilian Academy of Letters.



Added to my booklist.

Sunday, August 09, 2009

Si Se Puede

Venezuela's Salvation (Book) Army

"In Venezuela, President Hugo Chavez has launched a "Revolutionary Reading Plan." Extending his book club urges, Chavez has given away thousands of free books and sent "book squadrons" around the country to urge citizens to read.

According to the BBC, the Venezuelan government has handed out thousands of free books, including "Don Quixote" by Miguel de Cervantes and "Les Miserables" by Victor Hugo, encouraging citizens to read to improve the country. Eager readers lined up in the capital city for "hundreds of meters" to get their free copies of the Hugo classic.

Here's more from the article: "[A] key part of the Reading Plan are thousands of 'book squadrons' ... Each squadron wears a different colour to identify their type of book. For example, the red team promotes autobiographies while the black team discusses books on 'militant resistance.'" (Via Book Bench)"

Via Jason Boog on Galleycat<

Brazilian Café: Free MP3 Download

Brazilian Café: Sensuous samba, bossa nova and jazz from Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Salvador and beyond. Download a FREE MP3 from Brazilian Café!


Saturday, August 08, 2009

THE LOVELY BONES: Movie Trailer

There are few books that haunt you and whose first lines stay with you for life. The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold is one of those books.

This fall the movie version debuts and I am sure that those of you like me, who mourned, wept, and gulped sobs for Susie and longed for justice for her will look forward to seeing how it plays out on screen.



Imperial by William Vollmann

I recently came across this great interview at www.motherjones.com calling William Vollmann "a writer with no borders."

He refers to his new book, Imperial, as "the continuum between Mexico and America."





A man of many words and few delusions, Vollmann is a National Book Award–winning novelist, a daring oral historian, and an intrepid journalist. His latest moral inquiry is an encyclopedic gathering of facts, stories, impressions, and analysis about the volatile and tragic U.S.-Mexico borderland. Imperial is a county in California, a city, a valley, and a beach, but for Vollmann, “Imperial is the continuum between Mexico and California”—a geographical and spiritual entity, the “kingdom of secrets,” and the site of epic battles over water, work, sovereignty, power, and wealth.


Ten years in the making, this immense, poetically structured, provoking, and surprisingly intimate volume of reportage, history, and reflection chronicles Vollmann’s risky journeys through deserts, cities, and archives, through contradictions, confessions, and lies. Vollmann talks with all kinds of people under circumstances alarming, bizarre, tender, and funny. He navigates the infamously foul New River, descends into Mexicali’s “Chinese tunnels,” and vigorously investigates the urgent conundrums of illegal immigration and floundering agriculture, increasing water usage and falling water tables, and pollution and prejudice.


He writes of love and hate; strip clubs, churches, and the maquiladoras; and violence and generosity. He asks, “What can I learn?” And he confesses, “everything is precious to me.” In an age of trash punditry, Twitter, and gnat-like attention spans, Vollmann’s curiosity, forthrightness, lyricism, capaciousness, and empathy are revolutionary.



Adding it to my list.

Friday, August 07, 2009

Library of Congress: National Book Festival News

"To provide National Book Festival-goers with the latest event news and information, the Library of Congress added a variety of social networking features, including updates through Twitter and Facebook.

To receive up-to-the-minute information for this year’s event such as author activities, day-of event details and much more, follow the Library on Twitter (@librarycongress or #nbf) or become a Fan of the Library on Facebook (www.facebook.com/libraryofcongress)."

Via www.reading.org

10 Classic Nuyorican Authors & Poets

The poetry of Puerto Rican experience ranges from slams, to spoken word, to sonnets and free verse.


10. Miguel Piñero co-founded the Nuyorican Poets Café with poet Miguel Algarín. While in Sing Sing prison, he wrote the play Short Eyes, which ended up on Broadway and was nominated for 6 Tony awards.


9. Esmeralda Santiago writes memoirs and novels that deal with the themes of identity and culture of Nuyoricans. Her most famous novels are When I was Puerto Rican and American Dream.


8. Tato Laviera is a poet. His poetry, which is primarily spoken word, mixes spanish and english and addresses the issues of culture identity and language of Nuyoricans.


7. Jesús Colón is known as the father of the Nuyorican movement, and was the first Puerto Rican to write in English about his experiences as an immigrant in his most famous book A Puerto Rican in New York.


6. Julia de Burgos is one of the famous Puerto Rican poets. In her poetry and in her life, she advocated Puerto Rican independence as well as women’s civil rights and Afro-Cuban rights5. Giannina Braschi is a Nuyorican who wrote the first Spanglish novel: YO-YO BOING.


4. Edwin Torres is a Puerto Rican New York Supreme Court judge who wrote the novel Carlito’s Way, which was made into a movie.


3. Martin Espada is a Nuyorican poet, essayist and translator. Recently he's worked hard to promote young Latino poets.


2. Pedro Pietri is a poet and playwright. He co-founded the Nuyorican Poets Café. The poet Laureate of Nuyorican movement, he is the author of “Puerto Rican Obituary” a seminal Nuyorican poem about the difficulties faced by Puerto Ricans in New York.


1. Luis Palés Matos was Puerto Rican poet who wrote about colonization and slavery. His poetry is known for it's musical rhythms and Afro-Cuban influence.



via miapogeo.com

Eduardo Galeano on "Mirrors: Stories of Almost Everyone

Fresh Off Worldwide Attention for Joining Obama's Book Collection, Uruguayan Author Eduardo Galeano Returns with "Mirrors: Stories of Almost Everyone"

Democracy Now spends an hour with one of Latin Americas most acclaimed writers, Eduardo Galeano. The Uruguayan novelist and journalist recently made headlines around the world when Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez gave President Obama a copy of Galeanos classic work, The Open Veins of Latin America. Eduardo Galeanos latest book is Mirrors: Stories of Almost Everyone. DN speaks to Galeano about his reaction to the Chavez-Obama book exchange, media and politics in Latin America, his assessment of Obama, and more.


All of Amazon's Acquisitions

There has been a lot of talk about Amazon.com's intentions within the publishing industry and also in the tech world. I came across this great poster that graphs all of Amazon.com's acquisitions with each branch representing a year.

via meettheboss.com

Thursday, August 06, 2009

The Bronx is Next

Sonia Sanchez's Sister Son/ji & The Bronx is Next

Thursday, August 6 @ 8 pm
Friday, August 7 @ 8 pm
Saturday, August 8 @ 8 pm
Sunday, August 9 @ 3 pm
Thursday, August 13 @ 8 pm
Friday, August 14 @ 8 pm
Saturday, August 15 @ 8 pm
Sunday, August 16 @ 3 pm
Monday, August 17 @ 8 pm
$20-$30 Riverside Theatre
91 Claremont Avenue
between 120th and 121st Streets
New York, NY 10027

An evening of two one-act plays celebrating the bold spirit of poet/ playwright Sonia Sanchez. Sanchez’s first play, The Bronx Is Next, is a provoking commentary on interracial racism and interracial sexism that premiered in The Drama Review in 1968. The play typifies Sanchez’s bold spirit as it illustrates her early capacity to celebrate the Black Power Movement and critique it at the same time.

Sister Son/Ji, in part, explores the vital role in the movement of college students whose personal interactions often mimicked confrontational, unhealthy male/female relationships derived from sexist behavior within the larger black (militant) community. Descriptions of social and personal divisions among characters in the play emphasize Sanchez's criticisms of black paternalism within the movement-continuing Sanchez's unflinching examination of paradoxical notions of liberation in the Black Power Movement. This BeBop Theatre Collective production marks the 40th anniversary of Sister Son/Ji.

The Latina/o Reader Blog Carnival

I'm very happy to host and share this carnival that is so close to my heart:


Silvio Sirias, author of the novel, Bernardo and the Virgin, sent in his post on Cuban Identity as Dreamworld: On Reading Cristina García.



Kathy, a Bermudian born book blogger who I had the pleasure of meeting at BEA, sent in a review of THE SOLOIST by Steve Lopez, a book that changed her thinking on homelessness and mental illness. She also wrote a review of LOVE WALKED IN by Marisa de los Santos, a book she notes that serves as a "delightful reminder that love is precious and comes in many different forms."


Meanwhile, Julie from BookingMama, another fabulous book blogger who presented at BEA, sent in her review of Into the Beautiful North. She observed, "there is no doubt that this book deals with some very serious issues, yet Mr. Urrea included so many entertaining scenes and characters into this story." About The Disappearance of Irene Dos Santos, she says it, "introduced a lot of new things to" her. On Belong to Me she writes, "probably the first thing that attracted me to BELONG TO ME by Marisa de los Santos was the cover artwork." On The Sum of Our Days, Julie says, "one thing that I really enjoyed about this memoir was reading about one of Ms. Allende's best friends, Tabra."


The themes for this carnival included:

1. Your most beloved book by a Hispanic author and the reason it's your favorite.
2. The book by a Hispanic author you are exceedingly looking forward to reading (it can be an upcoming book or just one you haven't read yet).
3. What Hispanic person or historic event would you love to see covered in a book?
4. Who is your Latino/Latina role model?
5. On Hispanic Stereotypes and tired cliches
6. Suggested topics


A special thank you to all our participants and those who promoted the carnival through Twitter and online, especially Jo Ann at Authorslatino.com.

* I left the carnival open a few days past the due date for late subsmissions hence the late post.

Announcement: The Latinos in Social Media Heritage Tour Summit

The first national tour by Latinos in Social Media (LatISM), takes place in three states - NY, TX, FL - during the Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15th - Oct. 15th).





With 21 million projected Latino Internet users by 2010, Latinos are adopting social media as their primary source of communication, news and entertainment faster than any other group. Their buying power is projected to reach $1.3 Trillion by 2013.

This two-day event will provide a networking opportunity and conference presentation, bringing together the leading minds and innovators in social media and technology. Attendees will benefit by learning how to leverage their business and utilize new opportunities within social media to connect with the Hispanic market. All are welcome to learn, understand and support Latinos in the current dynamic social media environment.

The Latinos In Social Media Heritage Tour, will present these topics and more: Latest trends in social media and effective marketing strategies. Case studies of top brands/companies; challenges and obstacles. Developing social media technologies and trends Latino culture and demographics in the U.S. today

The Latinos in Social Media Heritage Tour schedule:

Houston
September 24, 2009-September 25, 2009
New York
October 1, 2009- October 2, 2009
Orlando
October 8, 2009-October 9, 2009

This summit is sponsored by major national corporations.

LatISM is using their Facebook group and Twitter to promote and update their members:

www.facebook.com
@LatISM

More information about the conference can be found at: http://www.latism.org

Contact: lpagan@latism.org

Identity Entanglement

In her lecture, "Belonging to Britain", Hazel Carby looks at the historic relationship between England and Jamaica, including the history of the slave trade in Bristol and the complex question of identity for those of mixed British and West Indian heritage. Carby is a professor of African American Studies and American Studies at Yale University. Born in Britain of Jamaican and Welsh parentage, she has broadened the range of African American scholarship by situating it in the larger context of the international black diaspora.


Wednesday, August 05, 2009

Share the Good Will: Fresh Air Fund Looking for Host Families

When I was a small child, many of my friends went away for the summer through the Fresh Air Fund program. My mother who was extremely over protective never let me go away to any sort of summer camp but I remember being very envious of my friends who not only went away for the summer somewhere "far away" but also received letters and gifts throughout the year from their "family."

If you are in a position to host an inner city child for a couple of weeks I think this is a great program and if you would like to sign up your child, you can find out more at Freshair.org

The "Fresh Air Fund has been around since 1877. They help children from the age of 6-12 years old who live in NYC low income households have a two week experience with a host family or get sent to one of their camps. There is still time to host a child and they are looking for host families in the following states:

Connecticut
Delaware
Massachusetts
Maine
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New York
Ontario
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
Virginia
Vermont"



via Mamistimeout.com

Tuesday, August 04, 2009

For Anyone Who Has Ever Been Asked: "What Are You?"



Love this ad for www.whatrugear.com

Blended Nation

Added to my Wish List:

Last May it was reported that "Multiracial Americans have become the fastest growing demographic group" in the nation.

Now comes this visually stunning book, Blended Nation: Portraits and Interviews of Mixed-Race America by husband and wife Mike Tauber and Pamela Singh, with an introduction by Rebecca Walker, and a foreword by Ann Curry.

What are you? On the 2000 U.S. Census, for the first time, multiracial individuals were allowed to indicate more than one race. Nearly seven million Americans did so. Blended Nation: Portraits and Interviews of Mixed Race America features individuals from this rapidly growing demographic of mixed race Americans across the country who identify as more than one race.

Through words and images, Mike Tauber and Pamela Singh explore the concept of race in America through the prism of the very personal experiences of people of mixed race heritage. Ann Curry writes in her Foreword, “As dad would say, ‘You are the best of both worlds,’ and so are the people you see on these pages, who cannot but strengthen America’s dream, as they are living proof it comes true.”








Maria Celeste Arraras: Travel Lightly, Ditch the Rocks/Resentments

Maria Celeste Arraras discusses life lessons
to help her readers discover a rewarding and positive lifestyle,
author of Make Your Life Prime Time.

Sunday, August 02, 2009

Young Lords Party 40th Anniversary and Reunion

Young Lords Party 40th Anniversary and Reunion, August 23rd @ 12 pm, First Spanish Methodist Church on Lexington Avenue and East 111th Street



"On July 26th, 1969 the Young Lords officially held it’s first event as an organization of young Puerto Rican revolutionaries. Although the overwhelmingly majority of the young women and men who founded the organization, or subsequently joined, did not understand it at the time, “the rest is history.”

Former members of the NYC branch invite you to commemorate the 40th anniversary. "Visions of Action, Impact and Legacy," is the theme for the event. Other events to follow."

First Spanish Methodist Church
163 E 111th St
New York, NY 10029-2809
(212) 289-5690‎

Read: On the 40-year anniversary of the founding of the Young Lords by a member of the Young Lords Party

Saturday, August 01, 2009

RIP: 1st Puerto Rican Woman Elected to U.S. State Legislature

My mom has been crying for a few days now. Her beloved "Orgita," more commonly known as the Former State Senator, Dr. Olga A. Mendez, elected to the New York State Senate in 1978, a position she held for 26 years, lost her battle with cancer theis week.



My mother's beloved friend, was a pioneer. An idol for Puerto Ricans and women everywhere who paved the way for others. She talked the talk and walked the walk. She was a a tireless advocate for the concerns of her constituents and lived for most of her life in East Harlem.

Born in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico, Mendez moved to the Mainland U.S. after receiving a bachelor's degree from the Universidad de Puerto Rico in 1950. She received a master's degree in psychology from the Teacher's College at Columbia University in 1960 and a doctorate's in educational psychology from Yeshiva University in 1975.

Like many other minorities, "Mrs. Méndez was defined as much by her political pragmatism — some critics said opportunism — as by her ethnicity. (She did, however, proudly insist on being known as Puerto Rican, and vehemently rejected the terms Hispanic and Latino.)"

I just want to say thank you for all you have done. Your memory will be honored by those you left behind. Que en paz descances, Orgita.

A funeral Mass is planned for 10 a.m. on Monday at the Church of the Holy Agony in East Harlem. There will be no wake. She will be laid to rest in the Bronx.
 
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