Thursday, December 28, 2006

You Can Now Get Literanista Delivered to your Email

Check out the subscription form located on the right side of the screen, enter your email and have all the latest posts deleivered straight to your email!

Tuesday, December 26, 2006

How Literanista Got Her Heart Broken Christmas Morning



My family and I have always owned cats and a menagerie of other pets. Over 17 years ago, we rescued Polo, from abandonment. He's the one with his eyes open in the picture above, which doesn't do his dazzling blue eyes justice.

Polo was the literally the best cat ever, he never scratched, he was quiet, he was loyal. He followed me everywhere, in fact when I still lived at home, there was barely a moment when he wasn't at my side.

At some point between Christmas Eve and Christmas morning, my ailing, old, beloved Polo crept under my mother's bed and passed away. My boyfriend and I buried him last night in a wooded area near the beach.

My heart as well as my family's is absolutely broken. There will be no other, ever, like Polo. He was absolutely the best. My heart aches, it ached yesterday to put him in the cold, wet, ground, and it still aches to know I will never see his beguiling blue eyes staring into mine. I want to scream, and rage, tear my clothes off, yank my hair out! If this is how it feels to lose a loved one, a little cat, I cannot imagine the torment of losing a child, a spouse...

It hurts deeply, there is no consolation.

He was sick, and I wanted him to be at peace but now I jsut want him to be alive again and healthy and fine.

I know time will heal my ache but I wanted to honor his memory.

Rest in peace, my beautiful boy, I hope I see you again one day!

Thursday, December 21, 2006

Pa Que Lo Sepas!


How fantastic is this?


I just got my newsletter from Criticas (which I love reading & just had to share).


López Nieves Wins Puerto Rican Literature Award
By María Elena Cruz — December 15, 2006

The Institute of Puerto Rican Literature announced this month that López Nieves's novel El corazón de Voltaire (Voltaire's Heart) is the winner of the Premio Nacional de Literatura (National Literature Prize). This is the second time López Nieves has won this prize, and the first time a single author has been given this award twice. In 2000, he won the Premio Nacional de Literatura for La verdadera muerte de Juan Ponce de León (The true death of Juan Ponce de León), a collection of short stories. The prize consists of $6000.

"I really did not expected to win this award twice since it has never happened before," a surprised López Nieves told Críticas. "I feel like this novel has a life of its own." El corazón de Voltaire tells the story of Roland Luziers, a professor of genetics at the Sorbonne, and Dr. Ysabeau de Vassy, a historian, who set out to establish the authenticity of Voltaire's heart, which rests at Paris's Bibliotheque Nationale.

López Nieves is also the author of the historical novel Seva (Editorial Cordillera, 2003), and Escribir para Rafa (To Write for Rafa), a collection of short stories.



They also have a great feature on The Best Adult Books of 2006:
http://www.criticasmagazine.com/article/CA6401082.html

Wednesday, December 20, 2006

Say Word!


Word on the web is that www.Wordie.org is the latest geek addiction.

From Techcrunch:

You won’t necessarily build up your lexicon because there are no definitions there, only links to definitions. But you can keep track of those words that you hear or read and know you’ll want to use again like troglodyte or gouache. When you look up new words, you see links to various definitions, as well as a list of other users who have marked that word to remember. It’s silly but somehow addicting in the way Flickr is addicting.


This is great for word-lovers like me.

Try it for yourself!

Friday, December 15, 2006

Discovery of a Latino Audience

So, it's the end of week, and after a very merry birthday indeed, I'm tired and sad.

Anyhow, on to Literanista business:

From: The Monitor

Chicano author’s love of literature leads to young adult novel
by Martin Winchester



Carlos Flores knows the Chicano canon of literature well, having taught writing at Laredo Community College for more than three decades. He’s also a contributing member, with three published novels and several short stories to his credit. His latest work is a young adult novel set in El Paso, Our House on Hueco (Texas Tech University Press, $17.95).

"I wrote the first chapter, ‘Sweet Purple’ in 2002, and it was published in La Frontera, a student-teacher magazine at Laredo Community College. The reception among my students was surprisingly enthusiastic," said Flores.

Teresa Cadena, English professor at the University of Texas-Brownsville, also was enthusiastic about early drafts of the novel, and invited Flores to speak to her students.

"The experience was electrifying," said Flores. "Shortly thereafter, I knocked out the rest of the book in six months."

When the book was published earlier this year, the Sabal Palms Writing Project of Brownsville bought the book for teachers in their in-service programs. Some 40 to 50 teachers attended, and the experience again was exhilarating for Flores

"Two things became obvious to me," said Flores. "First, the discovery of audience can be intoxicating and energizing. Second, the hunger of people living on the U.S.-Mexico border for a conversation about our world must be fueling the current boom of Hispanic writers."

A recent book tour of Texas and New Mexico further inspired Flores. "It’s an exciting time to be a Chicano writer," said Flores.

Flores, 61, is by no means an overnight sensation, and his path to success has not been without struggle.

"After years of trying unsuccessfully to place my other manuscripts with publishers and literary agents, I grew desperate. My wife recommended I try writing something ‘inspiring and uplifting,’" Flores related.

"In the meantime my psychiatrist, who had been helping me recover from a lifelong struggle with depression, helped me see that at the core of my dilemma was ‘a rejection of my origins as a Hispanic and my parents, in particular,’" he said.

Remembering the house his father built for he and his family sparked the author’s imagination. "That’s when the "angel" first appeared, and I began writing the book," he said.

Flores sites a long list of literary role models, including Tomas Rivera, Rodolfo Anaya, Oscar Hijuelos, Octavio Paz and Sandra Cisneros. He’s also impressed with the recent works of Rio Grande Valley writers David Rice, Rene Saldaña Jr. and Oscar Casares.

"While many opportunities to publish have opened, the competition has stiffened," he said. Flores also thinks there are a lot of questions as to the direction of future Chicano writers. "Much discussion awaits us. As for me, I just want to be part of what John Gardener called ‘a great conversation.’"

In the meantime, Flores is enjoying the success of his latest book, described by one reader as, "a portrait of an artist as a young vato." The novel’s title translated means, "Our house on the hollow or the hole," which Flores sees as a metaphor for the Hispanic condition in the United States. "It’s a paradox of pain and promise," he said.

Flores has seen both in his own life. His advice for young writers is to keep in mind what Carlos Ruiz Zafon once told him, "Just because you love literature, does not mean literature will love you back."

Wednesday, December 13, 2006

Aw, Gawd, Who Remembers Sassy Magazine?


I don't know, maybe this is giving away my age but who remembers Sassy Magazine? Wasn't that magazine great? Well, now there is a book all about Sassy and insider going-ons. I love reading tell-all books.




THE SASSY ERA


By Irin Carmon

December 13, 2006

It's a rise-and-fall narrative of a departed magazine that tapped into the zeitgeist, a tale of a particular cultural moment, and of daring that has since become commonplace. Its progenitors have gone on to more prominent planets of the media universe, and yet they long for those halcyon days. No, it's not "Spy: The Funny Years," but rather next season's media self-obsession: Kara Jesella and Marisa Meltzer's "How Sassy Changed My Life: A Love Letter to the Greatest Teen Magazine of All Time," to be released in April by Farrar, Straus & Giroux.


Jesella, a former Teen Vogue editor, and freelancer Marisa Meltzer canvassed former staffers, readers and famous fans about Sassy's groundbreaking influence. "Sassy and Spy, along with the Village Voice, Spin and 7 Days, were part of a mini revolution that was happening in magazines' treatment of celebrities in the late-Eighties and early Nineties," the authors write. But the book is no love-kiss to everything Sassy. Jesella and Meltzer delve into the office squabbles, writing that Kim France, who arrived from 7 Days and is now editor in chief of Lucky, "cried every day her first year at the magazine because she thought Christina [Kelly] hated her."


Kelly, who went onto edit YM and Elle girl, is credited in the book with setting much of the magazine's agenda, as founding editor Jane Pratt's media attention and increasing absence from the office had come to irritate the staff. Pratt is referred to as "the Liz Phair of the publishing world ... Openly embracing fame and money has made her anathema to many former fans."


That includes Jane, the magazine Pratt launched in 1997 and left in 2005, which comes under fire from interviewees who complain that "the spirit of Sassy was one of creating stuff, and the spirit of Jane is consuming stuff." On the other hand, Lucky, also home to former Sassy-er Andrea Linnett (now Lucky's creative director), is praised by the authors for taking "a positive approach to the female figure ... and a joyful, girlfriend-y approach to shopping," despite France's stated worries that she would be accused of selling out. "


It's more of a real heir [to Sassy] than Jane," former X-girl designer Daisy Von Furth is quoted as saying in the book. Jane and Lucky, like WWD, are owned by Condé Nast Publications. Overall, though, the book looks on the positive impact of Sassy. The magazine has been heralded for its frank approach to teenage girlhood, and for its cultural prescience in, for example, discovering Chloë Sevigny and running an early Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love cover, even as it struggled with its ownership and resistance from cultural conservatives.


The book reports that, when Sassy was battling a Christian right-led boycott that scared many advertisers away, the late makeup artist Kevyn Aucoin "was working with Maybelline at the time, and told the company he would stop unless they reinstated their ads." Pratt told the authors that Aucoin "knew that their pulling out was related to the articles the magazine had run on homosexuality."

Monday, December 11, 2006

Harlem Girl Sings the Birthday Blues...


So another year has passed (almost, my birthday is on Thursday, at 4:26pm), and I do feel older and wiser but I'm still not sure if I'm happy about it.

It seem more of a progression than progress.

I'm not really upset about being in my "late, late 20s" to quote my best friend, Z. In fact, I don't really mind telling people I'm thirty (well, very soon to be thirty-one) since most people's jaw dropping and disbelief, in addition to still getting carded everywhere, is enough to boost any one's delicate ego.

No, what's really bothering me is more a sense of being discombobulated, not physically, but spiritually.

Two days ago, my boyfriend responded to my questions of plans for my impending birthday, with a curt "I didn't make any plans," and now we're barely speaking because I apparently annoyed the shit out of him by asking him to help me fold the laundry too many times.


I mean how is asking six times too many times? hey, taking no for an answer is hard.
But whatever, let him stew in his own juices. So back to what I was saying...

Oh yeah, I feel much more accomplished, and more strong-headed than the place I was at last year, but I also feel more anxious and more pressed for time. I feel like I get up everyday, struggle to get myself and my game face out the door, do my thing at work, come home, make dinner, get online and catch up on email and freelance work and then go to sleep and do it all over again.

I've been carrying around a book that I need to review for like a month, untouched. I'm just not in the mood and that's so unlikely me. Usually, I love taking long, idle walks, reading on the train or bus or park bench, in fact at every chance I get, lighting incense and just playing some instrumental music or even bursting out into dance. God, I haven't danced in so long, I feel shy and achy. Old.


Worst of all, I haven't written any poetry at all.

What happened to that girl, the one who knew Central Park like the back of her hand, that wrote poetry every night and slept curled up with her cat perched on one hip (my cat is now dying, he's been with us about 18 years).

It's weird but I feel like I'm at some crossroad in my journey, not quite there, but not far enough to let go of the past.

Earlier tonight, I came across this article:


2nd Teen Gets 90 years in Brutal Party Attack


HOUSTON - A 17-year-old suburban teen was sentenced Monday to 90
years in prison in the brutal attack of a Hispanic boy who was beaten, kicked, stomped, burned and sodomized with the plastic pole of a patio umbrella. Keith Turner was the second teen convicted of aggravated sexual assault in the April attack at a house in Spring, north of Houston. David Henry Tuck, 18, was convicted and sentenced to life in prison on Nov. 16. Turner was convicted late Friday after about 90 minutes of deliberations.


The jury took about five hours over two days to reach the sentence of 90 years. Turner will have to serve at least 30 years before becoming eligible for parole. Although Turner was the younger of the assailants and didn't have the history of racial attacks that colored Tuck's past, it was his idea to use the patio umbrella pole in the attack.


Turner, Tuck, the victim and two other teens were partying at a
house in Spring, drinking and taking cocaine and Xanax. Twelve-year-old Danielle Sons, who was at the party at her house, told the other boys that the victim had tried to kiss her, prompting the attack. Tuck shouted racial slurs and "white power" as he and Turner kicked the then 17-year-old, cut him with a knife, sodomized him with a plastic pipe and poured bleach on him in an assault that
lasted up to five hours.


The victim was left bleeding in the backyard until dawn, when Sons and her brother, Gus, finally woke their mother, who slept through it. During Turner's trial, jurors saw a videotaped statement by Turner in which he admitted to being the first one to grab the umbrella pole and joking about using it to sodomize the victim.


And, I just felt utter despair - for all of us, all of humanity. This despicable act, so reminiscent of what was done to young Emmet Till, by racist White men, who accused him of whistling at a White woman, back in 1955, turned my stomach.

How is it, over half a century, over five decades, or fifty one years later such a horrific act is being replicated --but instead now targeted at a Hispanic child?

How? What kind of hatred is brewing in this country, what sort of indecency and intolerance is being bred so that even our most cherished resource, our children, are becoming murderers and abusers before they're even eligible to vote
?

How?
I just feel sad now.

Friday, December 08, 2006

Spanish Film Series at Lincoln Center

Lots of good cinema begins tonight thru the 26th.

Speaking of the Chill...In Chile


Wow, is it a frigid day here in NYC! I have two layers of clothing on and on the way to work the wind felt like fire on my face.

Anyhow, I came across a very interisting article today about the feminization of Chile from the London Review of books.

I wanted to share it you all:


The Feminisation of Chile: Lorna Scott Fox goes back to Santiago

The Moneda Palace in Santiago is white, and remarkably small. I recognise it from photographs taken on 11 September 1973, in which the bombers close above seem small, too, like fat flies. I must once have seen this building and found it large – my father was British ambassador to Chile from 1961 to 1966. As children in Santiago we led supervised lives, between the garden, the Austin Princess and the Alliance Française school. I had a faint sense of who Salvador Allende was in 1964, when he stood for president against Eduardo Frei Montalva. I’m being taken to church and low on a wall there’s a poster with sad-looking crowds, flags and exclamation marks, and Allende’s massive spectacle frames.

In 1976, I was working for Chile Solidarity in Leeds, and getting a rapid political education. Some of the Chilean refugees thought I was working for the CIA. They had suffered violence beyond the imagining of our well-meaning spectrum of helpers, from church groups and the Labour Party to the Communists and International Socialists. The Chileans mapped the discords of Unidad Popular fiercely onto our own local squabbles. A decade later, in 1987, I went back to Chile during the preparations for a plebiscite on the continuation of the military junta. I was joining my mother on a nostalgia trip, she remembering the happiest of diplomatic postings, I looking for my ‘roots’. My old school, so bleak in my memory, hadn’t changed, but my eyes had: it is a Corbusierian gem. The most feared of my teachers, intercepted on perhaps his millionth entry to the same classroom, growled that ‘of course’ he remembered me. Our beautiful house had been converted into a computer centre: there was no sign of the swimming-pool that slopped out half its water during an earthquake, and the spreading fig tree that once held my mirador was now a stump. Santiago felt eerie, because of what I knew had happened there since I last saw it. The city looked primped, sedate; I don’t know what violence I expected on every corner.

By this time the dictator’s civilian economists had come round to the view that there was more money to be made under a controlled democracy. Parts of the right, along with the US, were ready for change. Surely the vote against the junta would be substantial? It wasn’t. There was harassment and assaults on pro-democracy campaigners in an exhausted, depoliticised society. The result was close: 55 per cent for booting out ‘Pinocho’.

I returned again this September, a few days before the 33rd anniversary of the military coup. There has now been civilian government for 17 years, exactly as long as the dictatorship lasted. The democratic transition was officially declared over last year by the Socialist president, Ricardo Lagos, after the reform of some of Pinochet’s most restrictive constitutional articles. This January, Michelle Bachelet, also from the Socialist Party and the candidate of the centre-left Concertación coalition, was elected president with 53.5 per cent of the vote, after a run-off against the right-wing credit-card billionaire Sebastián Piñera. I went back to celebrate her victory, and to attempt to gauge what a woman president might signify in such a socially conservative country. But my visit turned into a search, using women as my guiding thread, to understand the unexpected melancholy I sensed, the inhibition and muffled frictions. The government is already in trouble, and the transition is far from over.

There are, however, plentiful images of how far Chile has come. People stroll through the Moneda as a short cut, ignored by the carabinero guards; I was not searched or asked for ID in any ministerial building. An astounding symbol of free speech lies below ground in the Moneda’s culture centre, where cut-out figures of all the past presidents of Chile, from Bernardo O’Higgins to Lagos, dangle from nooses over the caption ‘Chile’s Pay-Back’. They are part of a funny, irascible show by the 92-year-old ‘anti-poet’ Nicanor Parra, the patriarch of a left-wing arts dynasty. Though the centre’s director was ‘coincidentally’ removed, the piece has stayed. ‘Let’s not get Parranoid!’ Michelle Bachelet laughed at the opening...

Read more here:
http://www.lrb.co.uk/v28/n24/print/scot01_.html

Wednesday, December 06, 2006

Why Immigrants are willing to Risk Death and Slavery

Shocking New Television Documentary on Latin American Human Trafficking and
Its Toll to Premiere on PBS in January


Maryknoll Productions’ ‘Lives For Sale’ Shows Why Immigrants are willing to Risk Death and Slavery


Maryknoll, NY--(HISPANIC PR WIRE)--December 5, 2006--At a time when immigration issues are on U.S. legislators’ front burner, a new documentary looks at the underbelly of illegal immigration, including the black-market trade in human beings. Lives for Sale premieres on PBS stations in January 2007.

The documentary’s executive producer, Maryknoll’s Larry Rich, says the production strikes at the heart of the immigration debate.

“The same grinding poverty that drives people to risk dying of thirst in the desert in search of a job in the U.S. is the reason people will expose themselves to the danger of being enslaved. Both are born of desperation.”

Each year more than one million people risk their lives attempting to cross the U.S.-Mexico border searching for a better life and to escape devastating poverty. Lives for Sale juxtaposes the “American Dream” with the perilous journey followed each year by desperately poor Central Americans and Mexicans. Women are especially vulnerable to a black market that preys on human beings, as illustrated by two powerful individual stories that emerge: A young Mexican woman and a Guatemalan girl fall victim to human trafficking, their lives shattered by sexual slavery.

According to Rich, human trafficking, is now the third largest illegal industry on the planet, after drugs and arms smuggling.

“Most people trafficked are enslaved as laborers. A Florida sheriff’s deputy told me it may look like simple prostitution or domestic servitude, but if you dig deeper, you’ll see it is a stark crime on many levels,” Rich says.

“These victims may harvest our food or do our gardening, or earn our disapproval as prostitutes, but we do not realize they are, in fact, slaves.”

Lives for Sale also exposes the ploys human traffickers use to entrap their victims in a flourishing immigrant-smuggling network. The cross-border journey is fraught with dangers ranging from robbery to debilitating injuries and death. These stories are brought to life, told by the immigrants themselves, people who help them along the way, human smugglers and law enforcement officials.

To see an excerpt from Lives for Sale visit http://www.livesforsale.com.
Check local listings for airdates and times.

Friday, December 01, 2006

Bloggers & Book Deals: A Brazilian Sex Worker's Tale


I was just doing a bit of research on bloggers who got book deals from their blogs when I came across this particular instance, which transpired earlier this year:


A one-time teen prostitute/blogger turned bestselling memoirist, Rachel Pacheco, from Brazil (who is now 22 and retired from her previous profession) got a book deal for The Scorpion's Sweet Poison, which has sold over 100,000 copies.


Very interesting!


NY Times Article:


She Who Controls Her Body Can Upset Her Countrymen By LARRY ROHTER



SÃO PAULO, Brazil — She goes by the name Bruna, the Little Surfer Girl, and gives new meaning to the phrase "kiss and tell." First in a blog that quickly became the country's most popular and now in a best-selling memoir, she has titillated Brazilians and become a national celebrity with her graphic, day-by-day accounts of life as a call girl here.

But it is not just her canny use of the Internet that has made Bruna, whose real name is Raquel Pacheco, a cultural phenomenon. By going public with her exploits, she has also upended convention and set off a vigorous debate about sexual values and practices, revealing a country that is not always as uninhibited as the world often assumes.

Interviewed at the office of her publisher here, Ms. Pacheco, 21, said the blog that became her vehicle to notoriety emerged almost by accident. But once it started, she was quick to spot its commercial potential and its ability to transform her from just another program girl, as high-class prostitutes are called in Brazil, into an entrepreneur of the erotic.

"In the beginning, I just wanted to vent my feelings, and I didn't even put up my photograph or phone number," she said. "I wanted to show what goes on in the head of a program girl, and I couldn't find anything on the Net like that. I thought that if I was curious about it, others would be too."

Ms. Pacheco parlayed that inquisitiveness into a best seller, "The Scorpion's Sweet Poison," that has made her a sort of sexual guru. A mixture of autobiography and how-to manual, her book has sold more than 100,000 copies since it was published late last year, and has just been translated into Spanish.

At book signings, Ms. Pacheco said, "80 percent of the public is women, which I didn't expect at all," because most of the readers of her blog appeared to be men, including customers who "wanted to see how I had rated their performance." As she sees it, the high level of female interest in her sexual experiences reflects a gap here between perceptions about sex and the reality.

"I think there's a lot of hypocrisy and a bit of fear involved," she said. "Brazilian women have this sexy image, of being at ease and uninhibited in bed. But anyone who lives here knows that's not true."

Carnival and the general sensuality that seems to permeate the atmosphere can give the impression that Brazil is unusually permissive and liberated, especially compared with other predominantly Roman Catholic nations. But experts say the real situation is far more complicated, which explains both Bruna's emergence and the strong reactions she has provoked.

"Brazil is a country of contradictions, as much in relation to sexuality as anything else," said Richard Parker, a Columbia University anthropologist who is the author of "Bodies, Pleasures and Passions: Sexual Culture in Contemporary Brazil," and has taught and worked here. "There is a certain spirit of transgression in daily life, but there is also a lot of moralism."
As a result, some Brazilians have applauded Bruna's frankness and say it is healthy to get certain taboos out in the open, like what both she and academic researchers say is a national penchant for anal sex. But others decry her celebrity as one more noxious manifestation of free-market economics and globalization.

"This is the fruit of a type of society in which people will do anything to get money, including selling their bodies to be able to buy cellular phones," said Maria Clara Lucchetti Bingemer, a newspaper columnist and professor of theology at Catholic University in Rio de Janeiro. "We've always had prostitution, but it was a hidden, prohibited thing. Now it's a professional option like anything else, and that's the truly shocking thing."

But Gabriela Silva Leite, a sociologist and former prostitute who now directs a prostitutes' advocacy group, argues that such concerns are exaggerated. "It's not a book like this that is going to stimulate prostitution, but the lack of education and opportunities for women," she said. "I don't think Bruna glamorizes things at all. On the contrary, you can regard the book as a kind of warning, because she talks of the unpleasant atmosphere and all the difficulties she faced."
Part of the controversy stems simply from Ms. Pacheco's forthright and unapologetic tone about her work. Traditionally, Brazilians feel sympathy for the poor woman selling her body to feed her children; she is seen as a victim of the country's glaring social and economic inequalities.
But Ms. Pacheco does not fit that mold. She comes from a middle-class family and turned to prostitution, she said, both as rebellion against her strict parents and because she wanted to be economically independent.

That a woman is now talking and behaving as Brazilian men often have may also offend some. Roberto da Matta, a leading anthropologist and social commentator, noted that even though role reversals were an important part of Carnival, other areas of Brazilian life, including sexual relationships, could be quite rigid and hierarchical.

Under the system of machismo that prevails in Brazil and other Latin American countries, "only a man has a right to command his own sex life, and that control is seen as a basic attribute of masculinity," he explained. "So when a young, attractive, intelligent woman appears and says she is a prostitute, you have a complete inversion of roles, leaving men fragile in a terrain where she is the boss, not them."

For all her willingness to break taboos, though, Ms. Pacheco's current life plan is conventional. She has a steady boyfriend and hopes to marry him, and is studying for the national college entrance exam, with a mind to majoring in psychology.

"Being Bruna was a role that left its mark on me, but I can't abandon her," Ms. Pacheco said. "There are people who still call me Bruna, and I don't mind, but I wouldn't want to be her for the rest of my life."

Nor is Ms. Pacheco immune to the influence of pudor, a concept important throughout Latin America that combines elements of modesty, decency, propriety and shame. In her book, rather than write out the words commonly used on the street to describe sexual acts and organs, she prints only their first letters, with dots indicating what everyone already knows.
"I think it's quite vulgar to say the whole word," she explained. "But I didn't want to be too formal, either."

Today is World AIDS Day!


There are many free HIV testing events being held around the world today, take advantage and go get tested:





or just lean back and be an armchair activist by clicking below!



Bristol-Myers-Squibb is donating $1 for every candle which is lit on their web site, up to $100,000.


The funds raised will be given to The National AIDS Fund, which is one of America's largest philanthropic organizations dedicated to eliminating HIV/AIDS as a major health and social problem.




Just one click of the mouse is all it takes!
 
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